Date   

Re: My first airbrush

roblmclear <rob.mclear3@...>
 

Hmmmm,Jack. Do you really think the Floquil will keep that long?
Don it depends on how you store it, I have kept bottles of Floquil usable for up to 4 years. All I do is ensure that the top of the bottle including the threads is cleaned with an old towel or rag to remove the paint that gathers at the top. I have found that it keeps just fine if I do this every time I use it. Otherwise it's gone in about a year.

Rob McLear
Kingaroy Australia.


Re: My first airbrush

Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

I have 30 year old Floquil that is still good.
Gene Green


Re: My first airbrush

Jack Burgess
 

[snip] Or will you have all 100 resin kits constructed within the next
<six months???? VBG
<
<Cordially, Don Valentine

Not at the pace I'm going. About 5 years ago, I built 19 kits over a 3-month
period but then stopped working on freight cars to work on the layout and
some other stuff. The trick will be figure out how many more years of
building I have left and then set a pace that I don't run out of kits too
soon. <g>

Jack Burgess


Re: My first airbrush

Kenneth Montero
 

Don,

I have some Floquil that is over 40 years old, and still can be used. It appears to be how well the seal on the bottle is maintained.

Ken Montero

----- Original Message -----
From: "Don" <riverman_vt@yahoo.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, July 28, 2013 8:10:14 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: My first airbrush








--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com , "Jack Burgess" <jack@...> wrote:

In part:

Bruce's advise about acrylics is good. I started out air-brushing
Floquil and Scalecoat for brass) and still use Floquil, regardless
of complaints about color quality control. (When Testors announced
the discontinuance of Floquil, I put in a $200 order with Caboose
Hobbies of the colors I use the most...I think that I'll have enough
to finish my stash of 100 resin kits.)
Hmmmm,Jack. Do you really think the Floquil will keep that long?
I'm still using some Scalecoat from the original company on Velmont Ave. in Birmingham, Alabama and gave Armand Premo a bottle of 410M
years ago that had "dried out" but which he managed to resurrect.
I have yet to find Floquil that could/would ever match that longevity, however. Or will you have all 100 resin kits constructed within the next six months???? VBG

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: My first airbrush

Greg Martin
 

Thanks Gene,

Airbrushing is more than just hooking a paint bottle to an airbrush. You
need to learn how to adjust the paint thickness and air mixture to make your
paint flow evenly, it takes practice to get that corrected and humidity
plays into it as well. Too think it won't flow, thin it will not cover, not
enough too much air the paint dries too quick and with gloss this causes
"blushing"... Very thin paint is advantageous for weathering but it has to
sprayed "tighter" and drier with a thinner width spray.

Keith think Baby Steps.

What you are hearing from these guys is that they have a certain brush
they like and have stuck with it for years after they mastered it. I have as
well, but I have different brushes for different uses but I don't think I
have mastered anything... 3^)

Greg Martin

Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean

In a message dated 7/27/2013 5:38:07 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
bierglaeser@yahoo.com writes:

If that Harbor Freight air brush is not the same as my first air brush,
I'll eat my hat. I must have used it for 25 or 30 years and used it to paint
a number of models that did well in PCR contests.

Greg's advice is good advice, I'd say.

Gene Green


Re: My first airbrush

O Fenton Wells
 

Thanks Dave, I'll look a tteh two air brushes and give one a try.
Fenton Wells

On Sun, Jul 28, 2013 at 7:35 AM, North Model Railroad Supplies <
nmrs@optusnet.com.au> wrote:

**


My only long term experience with a quality airbrush has been 30+ years
with
a Paasche H single action gun.

I have since used a friend's Badger single action gun, and honestly, if I'd
bought THAT gun 30+ years ago, I reckon I'd still be using it.

Both gave such good results that there would be no reason to change.

And I'm sure owners of the other leading brands would tell a similar story.

My Paasche came with three needle & nozzle assemblies.

One of the smaller ones was great for solvent based paints, and when I
tried
acrylics, the large size worked well.

From my experience there are four crucial points to address when using
acrylics.

1) Use low pressure - around 15-17psi works for me.

2) Use a larger needle/nozzle assy (see above)

3) Paint should be a milky consistency (this applies to all paint, not
just acrylics)

4) Use a retarder to slow down the drying time (Badger make one) and
you will solve the problem of paint drying in the gun.

Cheers

Dave North

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@gmail.com


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Provenance of this car

Eric Lombard
 

Here are some thoughts about this car... Not a conclusion, just some thoughts about a possible origin.

Some observations:
Straight side sill
Fishbelly center sill
wood ends (based on metal corner brackets)
roof and door very likely not original

Some math:
A 5-6-5 Youngstown door is common as replacement on cars of 8-3 to 8-7 IH

6 x a 6' door width gives car of ~36'
6 x a 5' door width gives car of ~30'

About 32,000 Cars of IL ~36' and IH ~8'-3" to 8'-7", steel underframe, and wood ends were built 1910-1914. Some of these cars had fishbelly side sills and would not be candidates.
Cars of IL ~30' and IH ~8-3 to 8-7 were rarely built (and none with steel underframe).

So, go with probable length of ~36' and inside height of ~8'-3" to 8'-7".

Back to the S&NY:
the handfull of box cars in ORER for S&NY through 1910 are too small to be this car. S&NY with no box cars 1920-on.

NYC System built over 30,000 cars with steel underframes having fishbelly center sills and straight side sills, wood ends, and of IL 36' and IH 8'-4" to 8'-6 between 1910 and 1914.This is clearly the vast majority cars with these features built.

So, S&NY 303 *might* have a NYC System heritage. Following are a couple of difficulties with this as a conclusion (and perhaps some others of you will come up with more).

Examining builder photos of the NYC System cars gives some pause:
The end end sills on S&NY 303 from what one can see, are, well, what are they? The sill on the right casts a shadow and so would appear to project out wider than the side sills. None of the ACF builder photos available to me for the NYC cars show anything like this.

Using the door as a ruler again, the kingpin appears to be about 5-8 to 5-10 from the outer face of the end sill on S&NY 303. Equipment diagrams of the NYC cars indicate a 5-6 distance to the striker on all series.

Eric Lombard

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On Jul 27, 2013, at 1:11 PM, dochauk <dochauk@...> wrote:
Group;

I am trying to track down the origin of this boxcar:

SNY boxcar
<http://www.black-swan-images.com/photos/i-zX7pKqL/0/XL/i-zX7pKqL-XL.jpg\;
It is listed on the 1905 ORER as being 33' 5" long, 8' 4" wide, and 6'
10" in height, capacity 60000 lbs. It was still on the property on the
October 1940 ORER as a MOW car. I believe the photo was taken between
1938 and 1942.

Something sticks in my head that this might be a former P&R car, but
I'm not sure.

Also, what kind of funky trucks are those?

Those dates look about right, as the car has been re-equipped with a steel roof (Hutchins?) and Youngstown corrugated steel doors. I don't know the origin of the car, but there's nothing "funky" about those trucks; they were Thielsen arch bars, which were applied to thousands of freight cars around the turn of the century.


Richard Hendrickson



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Provenance of this car

Don <riverman_vt@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "dochauk" <dochauk@...> wrote:


Group;

I am trying to track down the origin of this boxcar:

SNY boxcar
<http://www.black-swan-images.com/photos/i-zX7pKqL/0/XL/i-zX7pKqL-XL.jpg\;
It is listed on the 1905 ORER as being 33' 5" long, 8' 4" wide, and 6'
10" in height, capacity 60000 lbs. It was still on the property on the
October 1940 ORER as a MOW car. I believe the photo was taken between
1938 and 1942.

Something sticks in my head that this might be a former P&R car, but
I'm not sure.

Also, what kind of funky trucks are those?

Thanks,

Mike H.

Mike,

Without a lot of digging there is something about that car that makes me think it is off of one of Sam Pinsly's earliest roads and
located in central NY state, though that may be totally off the wall.
The added grab iron to the left of the door and the foot rail below
make me wonder if it was largely restricted to LCL service and never
left the home road. Have never seen such additions on a freight car
in regular interchange service.

Just some quick thoughts on an interesting car, Don Valentine


Re: My first airbrush

Don <riverman_vt@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Jack Burgess" <jack@...> wrote:

In part:

Bruce's advise about acrylics is good. I started out air-brushing
Floquil and Scalecoat for brass) and still use Floquil, regardless
of complaints about color quality control. (When Testors announced
the discontinuance of Floquil, I put in a $200 order with Caboose
Hobbies of the colors I use the most...I think that I'll have enough
to finish my stash of 100 resin kits.)
Hmmmm,Jack. Do you really think the Floquil will keep that long?
I'm still using some Scalecoat from the original company on Velmont Ave. in Birmingham, Alabama and gave Armand Premo a bottle of 410M
years ago that had "dried out" but which he managed to resurrect.
I have yet to find Floquil that could/would ever match that longevity, however. Or will you have all 100 resin kits constructed within the next six months???? VBG

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: My first airbrush

North Model Railroad Supplies <nmrs@...>
 

My only long term experience with a quality airbrush has been 30+ years with
a Paasche H single action gun.

I have since used a friend's Badger single action gun, and honestly, if I'd
bought THAT gun 30+ years ago, I reckon I'd still be using it.

Both gave such good results that there would be no reason to change.

And I'm sure owners of the other leading brands would tell a similar story.



My Paasche came with three needle & nozzle assemblies.

One of the smaller ones was great for solvent based paints, and when I tried
acrylics, the large size worked well.

From my experience there are four crucial points to address when using
acrylics.

1) Use low pressure - around 15-17psi works for me.

2) Use a larger needle/nozzle assy (see above)

3) Paint should be a milky consistency (this applies to all paint, not
just acrylics)

4) Use a retarder to slow down the drying time (Badger make one) and
you will solve the problem of paint drying in the gun.

Cheers

Dave North


Re: My first airbrush

Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

If that Harbor Freight air brush is not the same as my first air brush, I'll eat my hat. I must have used it for 25 or 30 years and used it to paint a number of models that did well in PCR contests.

Greg's advice is good advice, I'd say.

Gene Green

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, tgregmrtn@... wrote:

Keith,

I would advice you to take baby steps. I would recommend you start with
this Harbor Freight airbrush:

http://www.harborfreight.com/airbrush-kit-47791.html

It is not a bad starter brush and if you can work at mastering it then all
others will be a piece of cake. There will be no frustration here with this
brush it operates just fine. Both types of brushes work on the same
principle either external mix or internal mix respectfully. I own six
airbrushed including this one. It is simple to clean easy to adjust the air flow and
when you become disciplined spraying and cleaning then you can move up and
your learning curve is less expensive.

BTW this is the brush I am most likely to grab for quick projects.

Clean your brush every time you change colors and your brush will last
forever. Get a supply of pipe cleaners and an old tooth brush.

Just my 2¢ worth

Greg Martin

Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean













[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Watermelon traffic in Southeast

Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

I'm sure you are being facetious but I lost a flock of sheep due to shipping fever to which they were exposed while in transit with diseased sheep. Whether my sheep ever actually contracted shipping fever or not is immaterial. I couldn't sell them. How is this related to freight cars? Those stock cars need to be really, really clean.
Gene Green

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Joel-Geri Dee <geridee1@...> wrote:

Beyond the normal dumping of the floor sand base,Why would the stock cars need cleaning?  Melons grow in dung and are rinsed and waxed for resale before showing up on the store rack.



B&O M55H brake layout

Mark
 

This class had Duryea under frame and was wondering about the locations of all the brake components.
Photos in my collection and on the Internet fail to show the frame.

Mark Morgan


Re: My first airbrush

Bruce Smith
 

Fenton,

I use a Badger 220. Its an old brush now and there are probably better brushes on the market, but I know how to use it with both acrylics and enamels so it works for me.

Regards
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
________________________________________
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [STMFC@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of O Fenton Wells [srrfan1401@gmail.com]
Sent: Saturday, July 27, 2013 1:50 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] My first airbrush

Thanks Bruce. Any suggested brand or model?
fenton wells

On Sat, Jul 27, 2013 at 2:18 PM, Bruce F. Smith <smithbf@auburn.edu> wrote:

**


Fenton,

While you can use a double action airbrush with acrylics, I usually
recommend that folks use a single action brush. The reason is that the
double action allows you to blow air through the brush. This will dry any
paint in the brush and presto! you have a clog.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: Provenance of this car

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jul 27, 2013, at 1:11 PM, dochauk <dochauk@adelphia.net> wrote:
Group;

I am trying to track down the origin of this boxcar:

SNY boxcar
<http://www.black-swan-images.com/photos/i-zX7pKqL/0/XL/i-zX7pKqL-XL.jpg\;
It is listed on the 1905 ORER as being 33' 5" long, 8' 4" wide, and 6'
10" in height, capacity 60000 lbs. It was still on the property on the
October 1940 ORER as a MOW car. I believe the photo was taken between
1938 and 1942.

Something sticks in my head that this might be a former P&R car, but
I'm not sure.

Also, what kind of funky trucks are those?

Those dates look about right, as the car has been re-equipped with a steel roof (Hutchins?) and Youngstown corrugated steel doors. I don't know the origin of the car, but there's nothing "funky" about those trucks; they were Thielsen arch bars, which were applied to thousands of freight cars around the turn of the century.


Richard Hendrickson


Re: My first airbrush

Greg Martin
 

Keith,

I would advice you to take baby steps. I would recommend you start with
this Harbor Freight airbrush:

http://www.harborfreight.com/airbrush-kit-47791.html

It is not a bad starter brush and if you can work at mastering it then all
others will be a piece of cake. There will be no frustration here with this
brush it operates just fine. Both types of brushes work on the same
principle either external mix or internal mix respectfully. I own six
airbrushed including this one. It is simple to clean easy to adjust the air flow and
when you become disciplined spraying and cleaning then you can move up and
your learning curve is less expensive.

BTW this is the brush I am most likely to grab for quick projects.

Clean your brush every time you change colors and your brush will last
forever. Get a supply of pipe cleaners and an old tooth brush.

Just my 2¢ worth

Greg Martin

Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean


Provenance of this car

dochauk
 

Group;

I am trying to track down the origin of this boxcar:

SNY boxcar
<http://www.black-swan-images.com/photos/i-zX7pKqL/0/XL/i-zX7pKqL-XL.jpg\;
It is listed on the 1905 ORER as being 33' 5" long, 8' 4" wide, and 6'
10" in height, capacity 60000 lbs. It was still on the property on the
October 1940 ORER as a MOW car. I believe the photo was taken between
1938 and 1942.

Something sticks in my head that this might be a former P&R car, but
I'm not sure.

Also, what kind of funky trucks are those?

Thanks,

Mike H.


Re: Watermelon traffic in Southeast

ron christensen
 

Manure was/is used for fertilizer, it is plowed under and not on the top of the ground that the watermelon matures in.
Back in the days we are talking about, they were not waxed as far as I know and observed as they were shipped into the wholesale market.
A short watermelon story
The local Milwaukee station agent would be called if the melons came in broken.
He would pay for them at the going rate. Well after a while he got tried of this because the wholesaler would than sell the broken pieces, besides getting paid for it by the railroad.
So the next time a car had some broken melons, the agent gathered up all the local boys he could find handy and took them with him as he paid the wholesaler. The agent than turned to the boys and said melons on me. The wholesaler not happy, never asked for payment again. True story from the 50's, names are missing to protect those still alive.
Ron Christensen

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Joel-Geri Dee <geridee1@...> wrote:

Beyond the normal dumping of the floor sand base,Why would the stock cars need cleaning?  Melons grow in dung and are rinsed and waxed for resale before showing up on the store rack.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Con-Cor 54' Mill Gondola assembly question.

Hobby Guy <markstation01@...>
 

I'm building my 3rd car and the floor seems to not want to sit flush in the gondola body well, causing the car to ride a bit high, any suggestions?


Re: My first airbrush

O Fenton Wells
 

Thanks Bruce. Any suggested brand or model?
fenton wells

On Sat, Jul 27, 2013 at 2:18 PM, Bruce F. Smith <smithbf@auburn.edu> wrote:

**


Fenton,

While you can use a double action airbrush with acrylics, I usually
recommend that folks use a single action brush. The reason is that the
double action allows you to blow air through the brush. This will dry any
paint in the brush and presto! you have a clog.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
________________________________________
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [STMFC@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of O Fenton
Wells [srrfan1401@gmail.com]
Sent: Saturday, July 27, 2013 9:50 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com

Subject: Re: [STMFC] My first airbrush

Gentlemen, I too am going to the acrylic paints with dragging feet and
needing a big push. I have done a few acrylic paint jobs and one went
pretty well and the others were OK but I didn't feel I got the same results
as with Lacquer based paints, Floquil and Scalecoat, especially on resin
kits. I did like the ability to do a three color diesel in one evening
with the help of a hair dryer. I have used a Binks Wren B airbrush since
1972 when I was trained. What is the best airbrush recommendation for
spraying acrylics I have a double action Paasche Millennium internal mix
siphon feed brush that I have never used.
I welcome thoughts and suggestions from those who have been successful with
acrylics. Unfortunatly I feel the problem is really me as I have a habit,
when I'm comfortable with something and will hesitate to try new things. I
have not gotten comfortable with acrylics....yet.
Fenton Wells

On Sat, Jul 27, 2013 at 10:37 AM, Jack Burgess <jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com
wrote:
**


I used Badger air brushes for years, first single-action and then
dual-action. The dual-action ones require that you do two things at the
same
time...push down on the button to control the amount of air and pull back
to
control the amount of paint. It sounds very difficult. But the problem I
had
with the single-action air brushes (where the amount of paint is
controlled
by a screw adjustment) is that I'd carefully set the screw adjustment to
produce a very thin line of paint and once I started spraying, the tip
would
clog just a little and the air brush would stop painting and I'd need to
stop and adjust it again. If you feel that you could start with a
double-action air brush, I'd recommend that you do.

Bruce's advise about acrylics is good. I started out air-brushing Floquil
(and Scalecoat for brass) and still use Floquil, regardless of complaints
about color quality control. (When Testors announced the discontinuance
of
Floquil, I put in a $200 order with Caboose Hobbies of the colors I use
the
most...I think that I'll have enough to finish my stash of 100 resin
kits.)

All of the Badger air brushes were siphon-feed air brushes. After using a
couple of types of Badger air brushes for nearly four decades, I bought a
gravity-feed Iwata air brush after trying it out at a NMRA Train Show.
With
Floquil, I have found that I don't need to dilute the paint with thinner
to
air brush it...that saves paint since you shouldn't pour diluted paint
back
into the bottle (although I've been known to do that). I think that the
Iwata air brush is a superior brand but, for most of us, it might depend
mostly on what you started out with...I was generally happy with the
Badger
air brushes but I'm not intimidated by trying something new (unless it is
acrylic paints). <g>

Jack Burgess

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@gmail.com


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@gmail.com


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

67641 - 67660 of 185020