Date   

New Gondola Book - Western Maryland Ry.

wm501jra
 

The Western Maryland Railway Historical Society has published another book in the Revenue Equipment series. This one is on gondola cars covering WM and predessor roads from the 1880's to 1971. The B&W 8-1/2 x 11 soft cover book contains 192 pages and includes a brief history of WM freight cars, rosters, data sheets (for most cars), painting diagrams, container cars and containers, and many photographs of most car types with multiple pics of cars built after 1928.

The book lists for $37.00 (WMRHS members price is $28.00) and can be ordered through the WMRHS website at:

http://moosevalley.org/wmrhs/giftshop/wmrhsgiftshop.htm

(The website is planned to be upgraded in the near future with PayPal options for the gift shop)

The book is also available at the museum in Union Bridge, in local (Hagerstown - Baltimore, MD area) hobby shops, and local train shows.

If anyone would like more information you can contact me at:

wmrhs0016@comcast.net

Jeff Adams
WMRHS, Inc.


HNZX 5700-5744 Insulated Boxcars

wm501jra
 

I'm trying to find out information on these cars. A while back I came across a photo of one of these cars; I thought it was a link from this list. It appeared to be a Merchants Despatch car very similar to the 1931 MDT cars (rebuilt 1956) leased to the WM (WMRX 1-15). I tried searching the posts and some other photo databases but no luck.

Anybody remember this or have any information on these?

Thanks,
Jeff Adams


Market Survey - CB&Q 70-ton 2-bay sand hoppers

Dave Lotz
 

Hi All,

I’m conducting a survey to determine the potential demand for a special run
of CB&Q Havelock-built, HC-1, ACF-design 70-ton, 2-bay covered hopper kits
that I am preparing to produce. There will be two versions of
custom-decorated Bowser kits in at least two road numbers and possibly more.

The first version will be from the 1943 order in the 180200-180249 number
series. The kits will be equipped with Kadee® National Type B trucks,
painted with a mineral red body and roof; white 1943 lettering with the
small, body painted, white only Burlington Route herald and large Everywhere
West script. This version will retail for $24.95 each plus shipping.

The second version will be from the 1946 order in the 180400-180499 number
series. The kits will be equipped with Bowser’s trucks with metal
wheelsets, painted with a mineral red body and roof; white 1946 lettering
with the small, body painted, white only Burlington Route herald and large
Everywhere West script. This version will retail for $18.95 each plus
shipping.

This will be a very limited run based upon the results of this survey. Each
value-added kit will contain extra Bowser weights to bring these hoppers
closer to the NMRA recommended weight and Kadee® No. 158 Whisker® couplers.

If you are interested in obtaining any of these kits, please email me
directly with the number of road numbers you would be willing to purchase of
each version. I will announce the results of the survey next Friday night
(August 9).

My direct email is Dave_Lotz (at) BellSouth.net.
<mailto:Dave_Lotz@bellsouth.net>

Thank you for your interest and participation in this survey.

Dave Lotz
Pooler, GA




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: road name on the gon closest to the camera

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi Ben and List Members,

Thanks Ben - you clearly have a better eye for this than I do!

- Claus Schlund

----- Original Message -----
From: "Benjamin Hom" <b.hom@att.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, August 02, 2013 2:43 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] road name on the gon closest to the camera


Claus Schlund asked:
"Any thoughts on what the road name is on the gon closest to the camera?
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/fsa.8d18321/

Milwaukee Road. You can just make out C.M.StP.&.P. on the car side.


Ben Hom





------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Charles Lindbergh�s Santa Fe Boxcar?

Andy Carlson
 

The Northern Electric, precursor to the longer Sacramento Northern Interurban, had a steel truss bridge joining the twin cities of Marysville and Yuba City, California. On both ends was a cutout design of the "swastica" symbol. Later the symbol was modified by cutting into a four-leaf  clover design, which persists to this day-Andy Carlson
Pjai CA





________________________________
From: sshaffer <sshaffer@zianet.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, August 2, 2013 6:36 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Charles Lindbergh�s Santa Fe Boxcar?



 
Brian the caption with the photo states that is a Native American symbol
for friendship and peace. It is a symbol popular with the Navajo, as well
as used by many other tribes. The symbol, drawn in either direction has a
long history that pre-dates its use by Nazi Germany. And it has many
meanings, including religious symbolism. Apparently it has also been used
by such groups as the Boy Scouts, American Pilots in WWI, Coca Cola, and
the Ladies Home Journal.
Doug Harding
A railroad in New Mexico used it in their hearld. St. Louis Rocky Mountain
and Pacific? New Mexico Eastern? I think it became part of El Paso and
Southwestern and later Southern Pacific.

Steve Shaffer
Las Cruces, New Mexico




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: road name on the gon closest to the camera

Benjamin Hom
 

Claus Schlund asked:
"Any thoughts on what the road name is on the gon closest to the camera?
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/fsa.8d18321/

Milwaukee Road.  You can just make out C.M.StP.&.P. on the car side.
 
 
Ben Hom


road name on the gon closest to the camera

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,

Any thoughts on what the road name is on the gon closest to the camera?

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/fsa.8d18321/

Thanks in advance - Claus Schlund


Trains and Technology : Cars

Rupert & Maureen <gamlenz@...>
 

Would anyone on this List have the book "Trains and Technology : Cars" by
Anthony Bianculli? If so, could you please contact me off List.

Thanks

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ


Swastika was Charles Lindbergh's Santa Fe Boxcar?

granpa92@...
 

Apparently some of the roads that followed the railroad tracks that
steam powered trains ran on in Arizona had road signs that used the
swastika as well. One can learn something new every day!

<http://arizonaroads.com/arizona/index.html>

Larry Platt


Re: Charles Lindbergh�s Santa Fe Boxcar?

William Bryk <wmbryk@...>
 

The Chicago, Attica & Southern used it as well as its herald. It was a
fashionable good luck symbol until 1933.

Regards,
William Bryk


On Fri, Aug 2, 2013 at 9:36 AM, sshaffer <sshaffer@zianet.com> wrote:

**


Brian the caption with the photo states that is a Native American symbol
for friendship and peace. It is a symbol popular with the Navajo, as
well
as used by many other tribes. The symbol, drawn in either direction has
a
long history that pre-dates its use by Nazi Germany. And it has many
meanings, including religious symbolism. Apparently it has also been
used
by such groups as the Boy Scouts, American Pilots in WWI, Coca Cola, and
the Ladies Home Journal.
Doug Harding
A railroad in New Mexico used it in their hearld. St. Louis Rocky Mountain
and Pacific? New Mexico Eastern? I think it became part of El Paso and
Southwestern and later Southern Pacific.

Steve Shaffer
Las Cruces, New Mexico




--
William Bryk
Attorney and Counsellor-at-Law
578 74th Street
Brooklyn, New York 11209-2614
Tel/Fax: (347) 497-5972


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Charles Lindbergh's Santa Fe Boxcar?

Al Campbell
 

The photos used in connection with this article show both ends of the
boxcar. There doesn't appear to be end doors on either end. If that's a 40' car
then the 46' wing looks right. I'll certainly agree that the car was used
only to help move the wing from the building. I bet there is not a waybill
in existence for this move. Al Campbell


Re: Charles Lindbergh?s Santa Fe Boxcar?

al_brown03
 

The Chicago, Atiica, & Southern also used a swastika herald. Dunno if it was painted onto any STMFCs though.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tom VanWormer <robsmom@...> wrote:

Folks,
Just loaded a couple of photos of the St.LRM&P Rwy cars with the
previously mentioned herald to the St. Louis, Rocky Mountain & Pacific
Rwy folder in the Photo Section.
Tom VanWormer
Monument CO


Tom VanWormer wrote:



Actually it became part of the Santa Fe.
Tom VanWormer
Monument CO

sshaffer wrote:



Brian the caption with the photo states that is a Native American
symbol
for friendship and peace. It is a symbol popular with the Navajo, as
well
as used by many other tribes. The symbol, drawn in either direction
has a
long history that pre-dates its use by Nazi Germany. And it has many
meanings, including religious symbolism. Apparently it has also been
used
by such groups as the Boy Scouts, American Pilots in WWI, Coca Cola,
and
the Ladies Home Journal.
Doug Harding
A railroad in New Mexico used it in their hearld. St. Louis Rocky
Mountain
and Pacific? New Mexico Eastern? I think it became part of El Paso and
Southwestern and later Southern Pacific.

Steve Shaffer
Las Cruces, New Mexico


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Charles Lindbergh?s Santa Fe Boxcar?

Tom Vanwormer
 

Folks,
Just loaded a couple of photos of the St.LRM&P Rwy cars with the
previously mentioned herald to the St. Louis, Rocky Mountain & Pacific
Rwy folder in the Photo Section.
Tom VanWormer
Monument CO


Tom VanWormer wrote:



Actually it became part of the Santa Fe.
Tom VanWormer
Monument CO

sshaffer wrote:



Brian the caption with the photo states that is a Native American
symbol
for friendship and peace. It is a symbol popular with the Navajo, as
well
as used by many other tribes. The symbol, drawn in either direction
has a
long history that pre-dates its use by Nazi Germany. And it has many
meanings, including religious symbolism. Apparently it has also been
used
by such groups as the Boy Scouts, American Pilots in WWI, Coca Cola,
and
the Ladies Home Journal.
Doug Harding
A railroad in New Mexico used it in their hearld. St. Louis Rocky
Mountain
and Pacific? New Mexico Eastern? I think it became part of El Paso and
Southwestern and later Southern Pacific.

Steve Shaffer
Las Cruces, New Mexico





Re: Charles Lindbergh?s Santa Fe Boxcar?

Tom Vanwormer
 

Actually it became part of the Santa Fe.
Tom VanWormer
Monument CO

sshaffer wrote:



Brian the caption with the photo states that is a Native American
symbol
for friendship and peace. It is a symbol popular with the Navajo, as
well
as used by many other tribes. The symbol, drawn in either direction
has a
long history that pre-dates its use by Nazi Germany. And it has many
meanings, including religious symbolism. Apparently it has also been
used
by such groups as the Boy Scouts, American Pilots in WWI, Coca Cola,
and
the Ladies Home Journal.
Doug Harding
A railroad in New Mexico used it in their hearld. St. Louis Rocky
Mountain
and Pacific? New Mexico Eastern? I think it became part of El Paso and
Southwestern and later Southern Pacific.

Steve Shaffer
Las Cruces, New Mexico



Re: Charles Lindbergh�s Santa Fe Boxcar?

s shaffer
 

One railroad used the symbol as its herald – can’t remember the name at the moment. – Al Westerfield

Yes, I found a picture of a 2-8-0 #101 St. Louis Rocky Mountain and Pacific. If jets were shooting out the ends of the bars the symbol would rotate counter clockwise.

Steve Shaffer
Las Cruces, New Mexico


Re: Charles Lindbergh�s Santa Fe Boxcar?

s shaffer
 

Brian the caption with the photo states that is a Native American symbol for friendship and peace. It is a symbol popular with the Navajo, as well as used by many other tribes. The symbol, drawn in either direction has a long history that pre-dates its use by Nazi Germany. And it has many meanings, including religious symbolism. Apparently it has also been used by such groups as the Boy Scouts, American Pilots in WWI, Coca Cola, and the Ladies Home Journal.
Doug Harding
A railroad in New Mexico used it in their hearld. St. Louis Rocky Mountain and Pacific? New Mexico Eastern? I think it became part of El Paso and Southwestern and later Southern Pacific.

Steve Shaffer
Las Cruces, New Mexico


Re: Charles Lindbergh�s Santa Fe Boxcar?

charles_8309@...
 

IIRC, Southeastern Express used it for many years.

Chuck Happel

"True terror is to wake up one morning and discover that your high school class is running the country".
Kurt Vonnegut

----- Original Message -----

From: "Al and Patricia Westerfield" <westerfieldalfred@frontier.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, August 2, 2013 9:12:07 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Charles Lindbergh�s Santa Fe Boxcar?



One railroad used the symbol as its herald – can’t remember the name at the moment. – Al Westerfield

From: BRIAN PAUL EHNI
Sent: Friday, August 02, 2013 6:38 AM
To: STMFC List
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Charles Lindbergh�s Santa Fe Boxcar?

Yes. I know.

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

From: Douglas Harding <mailto:doug.harding%40iowacentralrr.org>
Reply-To: STMFC List <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thursday, August 1, 2013 10:53 PM
To: STMFC List <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Charles Lindbergh�s Santa Fe Boxcar?

Brian the caption with the photo states that is a Native American symbol for
friendship and peace. It is a symbol popular with the Navajo, as well as
used by many other tribes. The symbol, drawn in either direction has a long
history that pre-dates its use by Nazi Germany. And it has many meanings,
including religious symbolism. Apparently it has also been used by such
groups as the Boy Scouts, American Pilots in WWI, Coca Cola, and the Ladies
Home Journal.

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Charles Lindbergh�s Santa Fe Boxcar?

 

One railroad used the symbol as its herald – can’t remember the name at the moment. – Al Westerfield

From: BRIAN PAUL EHNI
Sent: Friday, August 02, 2013 6:38 AM
To: STMFC List
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Charles Lindbergh�s Santa Fe Boxcar?


Yes. I know.

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

From: Douglas Harding <mailto:doug.harding%40iowacentralrr.org>
Reply-To: STMFC List <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thursday, August 1, 2013 10:53 PM
To: STMFC List <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Charles Lindbergh�s Santa Fe Boxcar?

Brian the caption with the photo states that is a Native American symbol for
friendship and peace. It is a symbol popular with the Navajo, as well as
used by many other tribes. The symbol, drawn in either direction has a long
history that pre-dates its use by Nazi Germany. And it has many meanings,
including religious symbolism. Apparently it has also been used by such
groups as the Boy Scouts, American Pilots in WWI, Coca Cola, and the Ladies
Home Journal.

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Charles Lindbergh�s Santa Fe Boxcar?

 

Yes. I know.

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

From: Douglas Harding <doug.harding@iowacentralrr.org>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thursday, August 1, 2013 10:53 PM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Charles Lindbergh�s Santa Fe Boxcar?






Brian the caption with the photo states that is a Native American symbol for
friendship and peace. It is a symbol popular with the Navajo, as well as
used by many other tribes. The symbol, drawn in either direction has a long
history that pre-dates its use by Nazi Germany. And it has many meanings,
including religious symbolism. Apparently it has also been used by such
groups as the Boy Scouts, American Pilots in WWI, Coca Cola, and the Ladies
Home Journal.

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Charles Lindbergh�s Santa Fe Boxcar?

Douglas Harding
 

Brian the caption with the photo states that is a Native American symbol for friendship and peace. It is a symbol popular with the Navajo, as well as used by many other tribes. The symbol, drawn in either direction has a long history that pre-dates its use by Nazi Germany. And it has many meanings, including religious symbolism. Apparently it has also been used by such groups as the Boy Scouts, American Pilots in WWI, Coca Cola, and the Ladies Home Journal.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

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