Date   

Re: Excellent Article on PFE Operations in Sept issue of Model Railroad Hobbyiest Magazine

paul.doggett2472@...
 

As usual an excellent article from Tony Thompson I am looking forward to part 2

Paul Doggett England 


--- In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

On Sep 16, 2013, at 9:33 AM, Bill Welch wrote:

> Since no one has mentioned the excellent article on PFE Operations
> in the latest issue of Model Railroad Hobbyist online monthly
> magazine, I will assume on one knows about this excellent resource
> chocked full of good stuff every month. I guess it must be the
> world's best kept secret.

I read the whole thing this morning; Tony's done it again!
--
"Not only is it not right, it's not even wrong!"
From Wolfgang Pauli, perpetrator of the Pauli Exclusion Principle


Re: New Drill

Charles Etheredge
 

I'm not "Tom in Texas"  but he does live right down the way from me.   The company he described is

http://www.batteriesplus.com/t-about.aspx.     I've done business with them and they are good.  Have a ton of LED's, etc......all the new stuff that is neat.

 

Charles Etheredge

Austin, Texas 


--- In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

Hi Tom in Texas, who rebuilt your batteries. I have at least 6 batteries which are dead. I really love the cordless Dremel and I would really like to keep them. Sears in Kansas sold the drills and I think I will check and see what they can or will do. Tom Chenoweth


Re: Excellent Article on PFE Operations in Sept issue of Model Railroad Hobbyiest Magazine

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Sep 16, 2013, at 9:33 AM, Bill Welch wrote:

Since no one has mentioned the excellent article on PFE Operations in the latest issue of Model Railroad Hobbyist online monthly magazine, I will assume on one knows about this excellent resource chocked full of good stuff every month. I guess it must be the world's best kept secret.
I read the whole thing this morning; Tony's done it again!
--
"Not only is it not right, it's not even wrong!"
From Wolfgang Pauli, perpetrator of the Pauli Exclusion Principle


Re: Frisco decals

slsfrr@...
 

Go to this site and ask that question. Lots of Frisco modelers and I am sure one can help you.

 

 http://www.frisco.org/vb/showthread.php?4088-Frisco-Historical-Society

 

You might have to sign in as a member, but it is free.

 

Jerome-OKC


--- In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

What is a source of decals to letter 1940s era Frisco hopper cars?

Thanks,

Jared Harper
Athens, GA


Re: Shooting at Washington Navy Yard

water.kresse@...
 

How long had they been rifling naval gun barrels at Bldg 197 . . . from Civil War thru WW2?

 

Al Kresse


From: "Jeff A Aley"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, September 16, 2013 5:27:17 PM
Subject: [STMFC] RE: Shooting at Washington Navy Yard

 

In this case, STMFC content is not mandatory.  We're glad you guys are safe.


Regards,


-Jeff Aley

Deputy Moderator, STMFC 



--- In STMFC@..., wrote:

Just a quick note to thank those who've asked - yes, I'm safe. I've also confirmed Ben Hom is safe as he was at the Pentagon this morning.

Mandatory STMFC content: Building 197, where the incident took place, was originally built with tracks inside and was used to turn naval rifle barrels. Since converted to an office building, the overhead cranes used to lift the rifles on and off flat cars are still in place as "design" elements inside the building
Marty McGuirk


Re: Shooting at Washington Navy Yard

Aley, Jeff A
 

In this case, STMFC content is not mandatory.  We're glad you guys are safe.


Regards,


-Jeff Aley

Deputy Moderator, STMFC 



--- In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

Just a quick note to thank those who've asked - yes, I'm safe. I've also confirmed Ben Hom is safe as he was at the Pentagon this morning.

Mandatory STMFC content: Building 197, where the incident took place, was originally built with tracks inside and was used to turn naval rifle barrels. Since converted to an office building, the overhead cranes used to lift the rifles on and off flat cars are still in place as "design" elements inside the building
Marty McGuirk


Re: 1950's scrap loads

Robert Kessler
 

Group:

 

I have vivid recollection from the early 1950’s of a scrap yard just off Meeker Ave., Newark, NJ on a PRR siding that loaded scrap steel bales into gondolas using a crane with a large electro-magnet.  The yard is still there and can be seen on Google Maps.  It is obviously a recycling business but sans RR tracks.

 

Bob Kessler

 

 


Shooting at Washington Navy Yard

Marty McGuirk
 

Just a quick note to thank those who've asked - yes, I'm safe. I've also confirmed Ben Hom is safe as he was at the Pentagon this morning.

Mandatory STMFC content: Building 197, where the incident took place, was originally built with tracks inside and was used to turn naval rifle barrels. Since converted to an office building, the overhead cranes used to lift the rifles on and off flat cars are still in place as "design" elements inside the building
Marty McGuirk


Re: Masking material for painting

Tony Thompson
 

Kenneth Montero wrote:

 
3M appears to have some potential confusion n the product names of several of their masking tapes.
(1) 3M makes two masking tapes with "218" in the tape's name:

http://3mcollision.com/products/masking/fine-line-masking-tape (which is the one that I think you are discussing)

http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/Marine/Home/Products/Catalog/?PC_7_RJH9U5230GE3E02LECIE20S4K7000000_nid=GS8MRH94Y9beN4BX5SJJFCgl (not the same)

(2) 3M also makes another green performance tape with "233" in the tape's name:

http://3mcollision.com/products/tapes/masking-tapes?limit=all

Schuyler or Randy, could either of you let us know if this analysis is correct?

      I don't think you're right, Kenneth. The 218 green tape in both web pages is polypropylene film tape. I don't see that they are different tapes. They even have the same detailed description, such as the use over fresh acrylic lacquer.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Excellent Article on PFE Operations in Sept issue of Model Railroad Hobbyiest Magazine

Bill Welch
 

Since no one has mentioned the excellent article on PFE Operations in the latest issue of Model Railroad Hobbyist online monthly magazine, I will assume on one knows about this excellent resource chocked full of good stuff every month. I guess it must be the world's best kept secret.

Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727.470.9930



Re: Masking material for painting

Kenneth Montero
 

Dear Colleagues,

3M appears to have some potential confusion n the product names of several of their masking tapes.

(1) 3M makes two masking tapes with "218" in the tape's name:

http://3mcollision.com/products/masking/fine-line-masking-tape (which is the one that I think you are discussing)

http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/Marine/Home/Products/Catalog/?PC_7_RJH9U5230GE3E02LECIE20S4K7000000_nid=GS8MRH94Y9beN4BX5SJJFCgl (not the same)

(2) 3M also makes another green performance tape with "233" in the tape's name:

http://3mcollision.com/products/tapes/masking-tapes?limit=all

Schuyler or Randy, could either of you let us know if this analysis is correct?

Sincerely,
Kenneth Montero



From: "qmp211"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2013 11:51:36 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Masking material for painting

 



I concur with Schuyler. I've used the 3M 218 Green Fine Line tape for 30+ years. It is exceptional product to work with. You will never be disappointed.

218 will confirm to surface details and when using the 1/16" tape it will conform to very tight radius curves. Plus you will always know when your edge is sealed because the tape will turn darker when you lightly burnish the edge turning it from a frosty translucent to a semi-transparent.

Leave some slack in the loose end and you can work across car siding creating a perfectly sealed edge as you burnish the edge. I use a dental pick with the point bent to a soft curve using the point to get into the details. You only need to burnish the paint edge.

It never leaves any residue in normal use. I have accidentally left tape on a brass model during baking and all the tape does is loosen and curl away from the surface. If there is any residue it comes of without any issues with a touch of a pencil eraser.

218 has enough stretch factor that you can use the 1/8" tape to mask off the wheel surfaces. Just start the tape and lightly pull on the roll while you spin the axle and when you reach the end pull tighter and the tape will break without having to cut it. It forms a tight seal and easy to remove.

I use the 218 in conjunction with the 3M blue masking tape and card stock for any large areas.

I have sampled lots and lots of tapes over the years and I keep coming back to the 218 Fine Line Green.

The only added tip is to keep the tape in the bag it came in to keep it clean.

Randy Danniel

wrote:
>
> Dunno what Tim uses, but the 218 green on that linked page is something I've used, with great results, including not lifting DECALS I'd put on a bit too soon . . .

http://3mcollision.com/products/masking/fine-line-masking-tape

> Schuyler


Re: Masking material for painting

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I think I got mine (quite a while ago) at an auto parts / body shop.

 

Schuyler

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of lnbill
Sent: Monday, September 16, 2013 7:24 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Masking material for painting

 

 

Randy or Schuyler:

Is their a common retail source for the 218?

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "qmp211" <milepost206@...> wrote:
>
>
>
>
> I concur with Schuyler. I've used the 3M 218 Green Fine Line tape for 30+ years. It is exceptional product to work with. You will never be disappointed.
>
> 218 will confirm to surface details and when using the 1/16" tape it will conform to very tight radius curves. Plus you will always know when your edge is sealed because the tape will turn darker when you lightly burnish the edge turning it from a frosty translucent to a semi-transparent.
>
> Leave some slack in the loose end and you can work across car siding creating a perfectly sealed edge as you burnish the edge. I use a dental pick with the point bent to a soft curve using the point to get into the details. You only need to burnish the paint edge.
>
> It never leaves any residue in normal use. I have accidentally left tape on a brass model during baking and all the tape does is loosen and curl away from the surface. If there is any residue it comes of without any issues with a touch of a pencil eraser.
>
> 218 has enough stretch factor that you can use the 1/8" tape to mask off the wheel surfaces. Just start the tape and lightly pull on the roll while you spin the axle and when you reach the end pull tighter and the tape will break without having to cut it. It forms a tight seal and easy to remove.
>
> I use the 218 in conjunction with the 3M blue masking tape and card stock for any large areas.
>
> I have sampled lots and lots of tapes over the years and I keep coming back to the 218 Fine Line Green.
>
> The only added tip is to keep the tape in the bag it came in to keep it clean.
>
> Randy Danniel
>
>
> wrote:
> >
> > Dunno what Tim uses, but the 218 green on that linked page is something I've used, with great results, including not lifting DECALS I'd put on a bit too soon . . .
>
> http://3mcollision.com/products/masking/fine-line-masking-tape
>
> > Schuyler
>


Re: Masking material for painting

Bill Welch
 

Randy or Schuyler:

Is their a common retail source for the 218?

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "qmp211" <milepost206@...> wrote:




I concur with Schuyler. I've used the 3M 218 Green Fine Line tape for 30+ years. It is exceptional product to work with. You will never be disappointed.

218 will confirm to surface details and when using the 1/16" tape it will conform to very tight radius curves. Plus you will always know when your edge is sealed because the tape will turn darker when you lightly burnish the edge turning it from a frosty translucent to a semi-transparent.

Leave some slack in the loose end and you can work across car siding creating a perfectly sealed edge as you burnish the edge. I use a dental pick with the point bent to a soft curve using the point to get into the details. You only need to burnish the paint edge.

It never leaves any residue in normal use. I have accidentally left tape on a brass model during baking and all the tape does is loosen and curl away from the surface. If there is any residue it comes of without any issues with a touch of a pencil eraser.

218 has enough stretch factor that you can use the 1/8" tape to mask off the wheel surfaces. Just start the tape and lightly pull on the roll while you spin the axle and when you reach the end pull tighter and the tape will break without having to cut it. It forms a tight seal and easy to remove.

I use the 218 in conjunction with the 3M blue masking tape and card stock for any large areas.

I have sampled lots and lots of tapes over the years and I keep coming back to the 218 Fine Line Green.

The only added tip is to keep the tape in the bag it came in to keep it clean.

Randy Danniel


<schuyler.larrabee@> wrote:

Dunno what Tim uses, but the 218 green on that linked page is something I've used, with great results, including not lifting DECALS I'd put on a bit too soon . . .
http://3mcollision.com/products/masking/fine-line-masking-tape

Schuyler


Mystery tank car, etc.

Jack Mullen
 

The recent thread and RMC article on the Barrett tank car conversions reminded me of something I'd noticed a few years ago in one of the Jack Delano OWI photos taken at Proviso Yard.
The photo can be found here
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/fsac.1a34659/
at the LOC site, but I'm afraid you'll need to download the 137+ meg tiff to see much of the car in question. This version: http://www.shorpy.com/node/14092?size=_original#caption
at Shorpy.com has somewhat less resolution but is usable, and quicker to access.

The car in question is the first of three tank cars in the block of cars beginning with a B&O wagontop boxcar. It appears to be a 6K gal tank car with three unusual domes or hatches, with light colored spills around them. Unfortunately, the best resolution I have isn't enough to clarify the details. I thought of a covered hopper conversion as a possibility, but I dunno. The car seems to be placarded as a hazardous commodity, so I think we can rule out slate granules. Is this image enough for anyone to recognize and identify?

Shifting topic, I think this photo has been cited before as an illustration of the variability of color and weathering. I'm struck by the dark, almost black weathered brown of the B&O boxcar. And the 1-1/2 door car behind it looks like it might have been involved in a fire, or half-sprayed with primer. The PFE reefer right of center appears to be a grayish ochre instead of yellow-orange. I suspect the angle intensifies the effect of grime on the surface, and it would look more orange in a broadside view. The string of CNW quad hoppers near center appear relatively clean, but each a somewhat different shade of freight car red. And yes, CNW did have a standard color controlled with drift cards.

Notice that FGEX car on the left with just one reefer hatch in the ventilating position ? <G>

FWIW, there are at least ten foreign hoppers visible, of which I can identify three as N&W and one L&N. All seem to be empty.

Jack Mullen


Re: New Drill

tchenoweth@...
 

Hi Tom in Texas, who rebuilt your batteries. I have at least 6 batteries which are dead. I really love the cordless Dremel and I would really like to keep them. Sears in Kansas sold the drills and I think I will check and see what they can or will do. Tom Chenoweth


Re: New Drill

Tim O'Connor
 

John

I've sometimes wondered whether this little 'paint stirrer' could be
easily adapted to hold a chuck. It turns at a much more reasonable speed
than any Dremel, is very light, inexpensive, and the batteries seem to
last forever. (I've had this mixer for 15+ years and only had to change
batteries once.)

http://www.micromark.com/RS/SR/Product/80975_R.jpg

Of course in the meantime I still have my Brazelton drill press. :-) But
I think a handheld cordless would be very handy to have.

Tim O'Connor

I've been using a Dremel 7.2 cordless drill for about 5-6 years for carbuilding, primarily as a drill for #78 drill bits. I've never been too happy with this drill because it's lowest setting is--I think--10,000 rpm. 10,000 rpm is a little too fast for resin and melts plastic, so I have to be really careful when using it.

Recently I've had trouble with the battery keeping a charge, so I did a little research and today went to WalMart and bought a Dremel 7300 4.8-volt cordless drill as a replacement. It's smaller than the 7.2-volt drill and readily accepts the collet I use for #78 and smaller drill bits (from Micro-Mark). Well, this thing is fantastic. It turns at 6,500 rpm, and I just drilled out all the grab holes for a Sunshine Q XM-30 in a few seconds. I did some practice drill in some Evergreen styrene which is pretty soft stuff and it worked great.

So I would strongly recommend this drill for model builders. It cost a whopping 23 bucks!

John

John Golden
O'Fallon, IL


Re: Whiting's Milk

Don <riverman_vt@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

Years ago--1997--when I lived for a year in Pasadena--oh so close to
my beloved Dodgers--I was gifted a large number of decals. This was
in the days of the first Email Freight Car Group administered from
someone in Cookeville, TN and I gave away several set of things thru
this group. Included in the gift was a set for "Whiting's Milk" done
by Concord Junction. Years later I came upon a photo of one of their
reefers from Arnold Menke I think. Subsequently Walthers offered an
express reefer that looked like the car in the photo so I purchased
an undec kit which looks pretty good to my eye.

Given the age of the decals I will probably give them a coating of
the Microscale product to insure they do not disintegrate when put in
water. At the same time I wonder if this company would have made it
into the southeastern US. I know precious little about milk movements
and milk companies except for what I have read in the hobby press.
Given that Concord Junction was/is located in Massachusetts, I am
betting Whiting's may have been a New England company.

I am sure there are people in this group that can educate me about
Whiting's.
Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727.470.9930
fgexbill@...

Hi Bill,

As a former Whiting producer/shipper I'll step up to the plate on this one though I see Roger Hinman has given you the basics. Your biggest problem is the decals you have. That is because every set of Concord Junction decals I have ever seen, and that is a number of them, has been produced with little more than guess work. None have been found that are very close to accurate dimensionally. Presumedly you are speaking of a Whiting car with the large white "W" above a white diamond all on a triangular red enameled sign. I have such a sign in my milk car collection and a friend has made ACCURATE Whiting decals based upon this sign and my measurements the rectangular
"Whiting Milk" enameled sign with the green background as well that was usually used with the red & white triangular one. I'm waiting for some additional sets from this fellow at the moment as my Whiting fleet is being increased to have a more appropriate number of cars in
proportion to the H.P. Hood cars in the the total milk car fleet here. I expect more in a few weeks, my friend just having undergone a move and being in the unpacking stage, but if you like I'd be happy to send you a set of accurate Whiting decals as soon as mine are received as there will be more than enough.

Whiting was an interesting outfit. In 1963 my folks even purchased the home of one of the family and we lived there for fifteen years, thus having an even longer connection with the family. Through its 1920 purchase of the Boston Dairy Company Whiting could claim to have been the first user of milk tank cars in North America and was the second user of them even without the purchase. Whiting also had about the most varied milk car fleet one can imagine between its owned cars and those leased from General American - Pfaudler Corp., with cars being used in both passenger and freight service, depending upon where their trip to Boston began. Such trips originated in New York, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine and some ended in Providence or in Connecticut rather than Boston. So, as Roger pointed out, other than a trip to East Chicago for repair, their was little likelihood of seeing one of the cars outside of New England or eastern New York.
with modelers license, however, you cold say the car was being used to transport orange juice concentrate from Florida as Hood is well documented in having used some of their GPEX cars for even after the use of them for milk was discontinued. I can personally document at least three types of General American - Pfaudler Corp. cars in the Whiting leased fleet with two types of MDT constructed cars amongst
the owned Whiting cars, so there was plenty of variety. Were that not enough, I do not believe that more than two of the owned cars with the enameled placards had them attached in the same pattern and GPEX seems to have used two styles of lettering on the cars leased to Whiting. For your Walthers car I can provide one style of correct GPEX lettering for you but if you want a car with the enameled placards as I suspect the Athearn/Roundhouse car is definitely the model to use in HO scale as it is an accurate model of the majority of the MDT constructed prototypes. Let me know off list if you have more questions or would like some accurate Whiting decals.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: 1950's scrap loads

Tony Thompson
 

Brian Carlson wrote:

 
I have a few gons to load. I was thinking scrap loads but I am wondering if the scrap loads we see these days of shredded scrap were as common in the 1950’s. My understanding is Electric furnaces were just coming online after WWII. I’m looking threw my books for pics but finding few. Could those around at the time comment.  

        Not sure I know the 1950s answer, but at least since the 1920s there have been several grades of scrap, ranging from light scrap to "heavy melting" which is suitable only for electric furnaces. Mixed scrap of course does and did exist, but is less valuable than single-grade scrap. Any large scrap generator would grade the outgoing loads. Some of the commercial model scrap loads have been kind of silly, with complete automobiles resting on top. I know better than to say "never" but that kind of thing is very rare, to say the least.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Fw: low clearance- better believe it

Ray Thibaut
 

Thanks Al
The video you linked was very funny indeed. That might make a cute scene on a model layout. Even better scene when Steam Era Freight Cars roll over the too low bridge!
Ray Thibaut


Re: Masking material for painting

qmp211
 

I concur with Schuyler. I've used the 3M 218 Green Fine Line tape for 30+ years. It is exceptional product to work with. You will never be disappointed.

218 will confirm to surface details and when using the 1/16" tape it will conform to very tight radius curves. Plus you will always know when your edge is sealed because the tape will turn darker when you lightly burnish the edge turning it from a frosty translucent to a semi-transparent.

Leave some slack in the loose end and you can work across car siding creating a perfectly sealed edge as you burnish the edge. I use a dental pick with the point bent to a soft curve using the point to get into the details. You only need to burnish the paint edge.

It never leaves any residue in normal use. I have accidentally left tape on a brass model during baking and all the tape does is loosen and curl away from the surface. If there is any residue it comes of without any issues with a touch of a pencil eraser.

218 has enough stretch factor that you can use the 1/8" tape to mask off the wheel surfaces. Just start the tape and lightly pull on the roll while you spin the axle and when you reach the end pull tighter and the tape will break without having to cut it. It forms a tight seal and easy to remove.

I use the 218 in conjunction with the 3M blue masking tape and card stock for any large areas.

I have sampled lots and lots of tapes over the years and I keep coming back to the 218 Fine Line Green.

The only added tip is to keep the tape in the bag it came in to keep it clean.

Randy Danniel


<schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

Dunno what Tim uses, but the 218 green on that linked page is something I've used, with great results, including not lifting DECALS I'd put on a bit too soon . . .
http://3mcollision.com/products/masking/fine-line-masking-tape

Schuyler

67741 - 67760 of 186164