Date   
Re: 3D printing (Was: New early P&R steel.....)

Bill Welch
 

Here is a used 3D Systems Projet 3600. https://www.ebay.com/i/264277258999?chn=ps&norover=1&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-117182-37290-0&mkcid=2&itemid=264277258999&targetid=593772166493&device=c&mktype=pla&googleloc=9012145&poi=&campaignid=2086169716&mkgroupid=76147899766&rlsatarget=aud-412677883135:pla-593772166493&abcId=1141016&merchantid=6296724&gclid=EAIaIQobChMImd65nN_J5gIVTvDACh3RMgOnEAQYASABEgIM5_D_BwE

Based on the used price alone, can only assume it will be awhile before we will see one for home use to turn out quality parts. Plus depending on where we live we might have to pay to fly in the techincian Ryan mentions plus the $2K for the routine maintenance. We can dream however.

Wondering if there is any video showing the 3D Systems Projet 3600 or Projet 5500 printer in action?

Thank you Ryan for taking time to explain the complexities.

Bill Welch

Re: Photo: ACL 17859

Matthew Hurst
 

One on the left back of the truck looks like an abnormally large neck pumpkin.... the one that looks like a U....at least that’s what my wife says. 

Love the cars!

Matthew Hurst
Modeling the late great PRR and the tini tiny H&BTM 
Winchester, VA


On Dec 22, 2019, at 7:59 AM, Douglas Harding <doug.harding@...> wrote:



They look like pumpkins to me.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of mel perry
Sent: Saturday, December 21, 2019 9:22 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: ACL 17859

 

those are wierd looking wstermelons

mel perry

 

On Sat, Dec 21, 2019, 7:13 PM Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: ACL 17859

A photo from the Collier Museums:

http://i.colliergov.net/museum/zp-core/full-image.php?a=immokalee-historic-archive&i=81.9.19.jpg&q=75&wmk=collier&dsp=Protected view

Not a great photo but at least a partial view of this ACL ventilated boxcar.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: 3D printing (Was: New early P&R steel.....)

radiodial868
 

Ryan, thanks for this very good explanation. I reread it 3 times.  I've been monitoring 3D printing with interest for about 3 years now, looking to move past having shapeways print my small detail parts and hoping commercial technology will eventually be able to do more complex car bodies. In the meantime, I keep watching for a home printer that can do those small detail parts. Speed is not important, but finish and ease of maintenance is.
RJ Dial
Burlingame, CA

Re: Bridge girder on three PRR FM flat cars

mopacfirst
 

And that small angle retaining piece is significantly bent, as are the tie rods attached to it, making it appear that the girder probably had a significant shift forward, assuming that the leading edge of the load was toward the viewer.

Ron Merrick

Re: Bridge girder on three PRR FM flat cars

Bruce Smith
 

And in this photo, the retaining piece on the bottom at the end is fully attached to the girder, supporting the contention that the Steamtown photo is a "damage" photo.

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@...>
Sent: Saturday, December 21, 2019 10:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Bridge girder on three PRR FM flat cars
 

We’ve discussed this load before. Here’s another picture.

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of mel perry <clipper841@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, December 21, 2019 at 5:51 PM
To: <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Bridge girder on three PRR FM flat cars

 

if you look closely at the pic, the front

centering bracket is partially separated

from the bottom of the girder, indicating

that the load had shifted forward slightly

probably becauae of lack thereof or

insufficient restraints, wonder if cfr49

was in existence back then or would

have been the aar?

mel perry

 

 

 

On Sat, Dec 21, 2019, 3:23 PM Matthew Metoyer <mmetoyer@...> wrote:

These Erie photos tend to be of damages, either to the car or lading. Could the load have shifted and hence the photo?

 

Matthew Metoyer

 

On Sat, Dec 21, 2019 at 3:01 PM mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:

that also my thought, there is no forward

or backwards restrains at all, i guess back then "g's" hadn't been invented, lol

:-)

mel perry

 

On Sat, Dec 21, 2019, 12:32 PM Charlie Vlk <cvlk@...> wrote:

Llyod

Think about the dynamics of the three cars going over the approach and crest of the hump.....the load is not secured for extreme vertical curves nor the impact of running into a string of cars after being humped (if the middle car didn’t dislodge the girder as it went over the top!!).

Charlie Vlk 



On Dec 21, 2019, at 10:57 AM, Charles Peck <lnnrr152@...> wrote:



Lloyd's question raises another question. When was the first hump yard

built and where?

Chuck Peck

 

On Sat, Dec 21, 2019 at 11:45 AM Lloyd Keyser <lloydkeyser@...> wrote:

Why is there not a Do No Hump sign on this load  Lloyd Keyser

Re: Photo: ACL 17859

Bruce Smith
 

Eric's post points out that produce that would have been loaded into freight in the steam era may at times have little resemblance to what you might see in the market today. Agriculture and the genetics of the food raised have changed radically. New varieties of crops are continually created by cross breeding and selection to meet threats such as disease, and market pressures, such as no bruises or blemishes. 

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, Al


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Eric Hansmann <eric@...>
Sent: Sunday, December 22, 2019 8:24 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: ACL 17859
 
Those could be of the Moon and Stars variety, or Sugar Baby. There have been many varietals. Here are some. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Dec 22, 2019, at 7:59 AM, Douglas Harding <doug.harding@...> wrote:

They look like pumpkins to me.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of mel perry
Sent: Saturday, December 21, 2019 9:22 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: ACL 17859

 

those are wierd looking wstermelons

mel perry

 

On Sat, Dec 21, 2019, 7:13 PM Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: ACL 17859

A photo from the Collier Museums:

http://i.colliergov.net/museum/zp-core/full-image.php?a=immokalee-historic-archive&i=81.9.19.jpg&q=75&wmk=collier&dsp=Protected view

Not a great photo but at least a partial view of this ACL ventilated boxcar.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Grace Tank Car

John Hile
 

Hello All,

AESX 576 is a Pressed Steel Car Co. product.  Speedwitch Media's "Steam Era Freight Cars Reference Manual, Volume Two" has several photos for reference.

The underframe of GRYX 168 may represent the fact that ACF changed running board supports on "Type 27" underframes around 1940.  On "Type 27" prior to that date, they tend to be the tapered c-channels, hung on the side of the center sill (as shown on GRYX 168).  These are similar (if not identical to) "Type 21" supports.  After approx. 1940, the supports tend to be the angle-sections, which are triangulated to the top and bottom of the center sill.  I have a great degree of confidence in the 1940 date from the photo evidence, but am using the word "tend" because we all know there is probably an ACF "Type 27" lot out there somewhere that will contradict the assumption that all supports changed in 1940.

I'm glad to see this coming-up on the list, as a few of us briefly discussed this at the last St. Louis RPM.

Also, note the mis-matched trucks on GRYX 168.

John Hile
Blacksburg, VA

Re: Photo: ACL 17859

Eric Hansmann
 

Those could be of the Moon and Stars variety, or Sugar Baby. There have been many varietals. Here are some. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Dec 22, 2019, at 7:59 AM, Douglas Harding <doug.harding@...> wrote:

They look like pumpkins to me.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of mel perry
Sent: Saturday, December 21, 2019 9:22 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: ACL 17859

 

those are wierd looking wstermelons

mel perry

 

On Sat, Dec 21, 2019, 7:13 PM Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: ACL 17859

A photo from the Collier Museums:

http://i.colliergov.net/museum/zp-core/full-image.php?a=immokalee-historic-archive&i=81.9.19.jpg&q=75&wmk=collier&dsp=Protected view

Not a great photo but at least a partial view of this ACL ventilated boxcar.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Photo: ACL 17859

Donald B. Valentine
 

   Perhaps, Mel, but I wonder if they are just quite a bit larger than we are used to.

Cordially, Don Valentine

Re: Photo: ACL 17859

Douglas Harding
 

They look like pumpkins to me.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of mel perry
Sent: Saturday, December 21, 2019 9:22 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: ACL 17859

 

those are wierd looking wstermelons

mel perry

 

On Sat, Dec 21, 2019, 7:13 PM Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: ACL 17859

A photo from the Collier Museums:

http://i.colliergov.net/museum/zp-core/full-image.php?a=immokalee-historic-archive&i=81.9.19.jpg&q=75&wmk=collier&dsp=Protected view

Not a great photo but at least a partial view of this ACL ventilated boxcar.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Bridge girder on three PRR FM flat cars

RICH CHAPIN
 

photo date 1927

49 CFR regulates hazardous materials not structural loads, although there were AAR rules that were the predecessors of hazmat since 1911 

I suspect AAR had practices for over-sized loads back then

here's that girder in place

rich chapin

Santa Fe FE 26 DD 40-ft

Greg Martin
 

Hey Gize.

Does anyone have access to plans for this car? I am looking for the dimensions of the side sill. I believe the it should br 26 inches and I eould like to verify that. It it customary gor the time, but I would love to know for sure before I brand this resin mastet.

TIA,  

Gteg Martin 



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

--
Hey Boss,


Somehow I got deleted from this group in late May. I guess someone didn't like me. Jail is a lonely place.

Greg Martin 

Re: Bridge girder on three PRR FM flat cars

BRIAN PAUL EHNI
 

We’ve discussed this load before. Here’s another picture.

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of mel perry <clipper841@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, December 21, 2019 at 5:51 PM
To: <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Bridge girder on three PRR FM flat cars

 

if you look closely at the pic, the front

centering bracket is partially separated

from the bottom of the girder, indicating

that the load had shifted forward slightly

probably becauae of lack thereof or

insufficient restraints, wonder if cfr49

was in existence back then or would

have been the aar?

mel perry

 

 

 

On Sat, Dec 21, 2019, 3:23 PM Matthew Metoyer <mmetoyer@...> wrote:

These Erie photos tend to be of damages, either to the car or lading. Could the load have shifted and hence the photo?

 

Matthew Metoyer

 

On Sat, Dec 21, 2019 at 3:01 PM mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:

that also my thought, there is no forward

or backwards restrains at all, i guess back then "g's" hadn't been invented, lol

:-)

mel perry

 

On Sat, Dec 21, 2019, 12:32 PM Charlie Vlk <cvlk@...> wrote:

Llyod

Think about the dynamics of the three cars going over the approach and crest of the hump.....the load is not secured for extreme vertical curves nor the impact of running into a string of cars after being humped (if the middle car didn’t dislodge the girder as it went over the top!!).

Charlie Vlk 



On Dec 21, 2019, at 10:57 AM, Charles Peck <lnnrr152@...> wrote:



Lloyd's question raises another question. When was the first hump yard

built and where?

Chuck Peck

 

On Sat, Dec 21, 2019 at 11:45 AM Lloyd Keyser <lloydkeyser@...> wrote:

Why is there not a Do No Hump sign on this load  Lloyd Keyser

Re: Photo: ACL 17859

mel perry
 

those are wierd looking wstermelons
mel perry


On Sat, Dec 21, 2019, 7:13 PM Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: ACL 17859

A photo from the Collier Museums:

http://i.colliergov.net/museum/zp-core/full-image.php?a=immokalee-historic-archive&i=81.9.19.jpg&q=75&wmk=collier&dsp=Protected view

Not a great photo but at least a partial view of this ACL ventilated boxcar.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Photo: ACL 17859

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: ACL 17859

A photo from the Collier Museums:

http://i.colliergov.net/museum/zp-core/full-image.php?a=immokalee-historic-archive&i=81.9.19.jpg&q=75&wmk=collier&dsp=Protected view

Not a great photo but at least a partial view of this ACL ventilated boxcar.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: 3D printing (Was: New early P&R steel.....)

Ryan Mendell
 

Dennis good point you brought up about the grit blasting. I do grit blast all my 3D printed parts or sand flat areas of parts with the sanders I sell trough National Scale Car. I developed the sanders specifically for this purpose.

Even surfaces that don’t have wax still have lines on them. These lines are left by the roller and knife of the jet printing head. The roller and knife need to be serviced at least a couple times a year to keep them in top condition. This is done by a 3D Systems technician that we have to pay and come in to do it. It’s not cheap, they charge upwards of $2000 a day for servicing the machine plus parts.

Another source of part quality is shrinkage. This can be controlled with axis print compensation. Basically an offset put into the printer setup to correct for part shrinkage in x , y and z. But if parts are printed on different printers the compensation might be a bit off between them and parts could come out different lengths. This may have been the case with the girders in one of the previous posts. Also the longer the part the more possibility of length discrepancy do to shrinkage.

Ryan Mendell

Re: 3D printing (Was: New early P&R steel.....)

Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, Dec 20, 2019 at 06:57 AM, Corey Bonsall wrote:
That being said, if I make sure to use a proper primer and gloss paint base coat, most of those lines go away. 
Thanks for the further informed discussion on the 3D printers. I have a further thought for Corey, or anyone else dealing with an SLA model: It's clear that if a prime coat will hide the diagonal layer lines, they can't be very latge steps, and only show because they are an aberration on what is a smooth surface. I wonder if grit blasting with 220 grit abrasive would remove them, or more correctly break up the surface enough that the eye can't pick them out. I know that many of the resin kit builders grit blast resin kits to improve paint adhesion with no ill effect to the surface detail.

Dennis Storzek

Re: Bridge girder on three PRR FM flat cars

Dennis Storzek
 

On Sat, Dec 21, 2019 at 11:15 AM, Bruce Smith wrote:
While hump yards were at least 25 years old at the time, they were not common.
The real question is, when was the first retarder yard built. Until that time hump yards were "rider" yards, and there would be someone there to protest, "I'm not riding THAT thing down." I wouldn't either, with only one operable hand brake for all that weight. 

Dennis Storzek

Re: Bridge girder on three PRR FM flat cars

Richard Townsend
 

I suspect the solid door is temporarily attached to the ventilator door by a hasp and lock or seal for security. The connection would have to be broken in order to open the doors. If they slid as one they would always cover the opening with one door or the other.


On Dec 21, 2019, at 3:59 PM, Bud Brock via Groups.Io <BudPCCRR@...> wrote:


Also note the watermelon car.  The 2 doors are strapped together to move as one.
    Bud Brock
PC&C RR

Re: Bridge girder on three PRR FM flat cars

Bud Brock
 

Also note the watermelon car.  The 2 doors are strapped together to move as one.
    Bud Brock
PC&C RR