Date   

Help with Assorted Freight Car Truck Colors

golden1014
 

Hi Guys,

I'm working on a few models for a friend and your assistance please with trucks colors for the following:

SP 1937 box cars, BC Red car, circa 1950

Monon 3-pocket hoppers, car color is FC Red

IHB 1937 box car, FC Brown car.

Thanks!
John

John Golden
Ramstein-Miesenbach, Germany

RPM Blog: https://railroadprototypemodeler.wordpress.com/


Re: Painting brass

bob.stetser@...
 

Soak in lacquer thinner for a couple of hours to remove whatever is on the model.

Run twice in the ultrasonic cleaner, let dry

Spray, from rattle can, Rust-Oleum Primer, SELF ETCHING PRIMER, let dry

Spray with airbrush color of choice.

Bake 1 hour in oven at 185 degrees, leave in oven until cool.


Re: Rapido HO cars for sale

Gerald Henriksen
 

On Fri, 10 Apr 2020 22:21:39 +0000, you wrote:

Rapido announced a third run of their meat reefers, and they're taking orders for four packs with new paint schemes. The red Swift scheme is in this run.
https://rapidotrains.com/products/ho-scale/freight-cars/ho-scale-37-general-american-garx-reefer

They are available in four packs, with the models packaged so that
dealers can break up a four pack into individual sales.

If you dealer doesn't offer them individually, you can buy them
individually from Rapido (though it will it appears be a random road
number).


Swift 3300

nyc3001 .
 

In light of the recent discussion about the Swift 2500 series reefer that will be released by Rapido, I was wondering if anyone had ever kitbashed or produced a 3300-series reefer. This series seems to comprise the most-numerous wood Swift reefer. 


Re: FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Steve and Dennis,

I suspect the toy tractor from Tractor Supply is an International Farmall A.

Since my earlier post I found a near-match in a photo from Peter Henshaw's book THE ILLUSTRATED DIRECTORY OF TRACTORS (Motorbooks, 2004). This machine was introduced in 1939 and in production until 1947, when it was bumped up to a Super A (presumably on the same frame) that continued until 1954. It had similar styling as the Farmall M, from the studios of Raymond Loewy. The tractor was a row-crop machine rather than a garden tractor as I first thought, and the offset gave it the name "Cultivision". Given that this was one of International's most popular and successful tractors, I am reasonably certain that his what the miniature represents.

The A was also available as a taller "high crop" variant, known as the AV.

It is grossly oversized for its prototype if used on an HO layout, but looks pretty good as a generic tractor.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Sat, Apr 18, 2020 at 1:48 PM Steve and Barb Hile <shile@...> wrote:
The whole Letter series of Farmall tractors were lettered A - M by size, with not all letters used.  The larger ones, the M's and H's were built in Rock Island at the Farmall plant.  Some of the smaller tractors, the A's B's and C's etc.were built in Louisville.
 
Steve Hile


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Douglas Harding
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2020 1:46 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

The Lifelike (now Walthers) tractor is a Farmall Super M-TA, first offered in 1954. The TA stood for Torque Amplifier, which had a two speed power shift, doubling the number of forward and reverse gears. It was a row crop tractor, ie had the narrow front end. But was also offered with the wide front end, sometimes called an orchard or vegetable tractor. The M was first offered in 1939, the Super M (more horsepower) in 1952. The M was slightly larger than the H. Attached is a photo of a load of Ms on a Waterloo Cedar Falls and Northern flatcar. The photo at Alton is a load of Hs. Note the difference in the loading positions, and the seat positions. The Alton photo also shows how the exhaust stacks were covered to prevent water from entering while in transit. Almost every farmer placed an empty tin can on the stack when they shut off the tractor. Notice the Ms have a hinged stack cover eliminating the need for the tin can.

 

Some Farmall tractors were also built at the IH plant in Louisville Kentucky. Farmall was a brand name of McCormick Deering, which was part of International Harvester.

 

The Walthers green version is foobie. Regular production Farmalls were never painted green. Nor did they look like John Deeres or Olivers (the other green tractor)

 

Oddballs at one time offered decals for the Lifelike tractor. But have been long out of production. I found a few sets last summer at a hobby shop that buys estates. Owner did not even know she had them.

 

Here are a few other Tractors I recall seeing often in Iowa:

John Deere, tractor works at Waterloo IA. Largest tractor factory in the world. Painted Green. This factory was the home of the Waterloo Boy, which John Deere purchased because their own tractor design was not working. That is how John Deere acquired the Waterloo location.

Oliver, built in Charles City, Iowa and painted green and white (a different green)

White, purchased Oliver, Cockshutt and Minneapolis-Moline and built at the Charles City IA plant

Minneapolis-Moline, built in Hopkins MN and painted yellow

Massey-Harris, made in Canada, painted red & yellow

Massey –Ferguson

Case made in Racine WI, cream and red colored.

Fords, grey or blue

Allis Chalmers, West Allis WI, an orange red color. Though some early tractors were green.

 

For more information on farm tractors go to https://www.tractordata.com/farm-tractors/index.html

 

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

 


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

What a beautiful model!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Fred Jansz
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2020 2:04 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

 

I once stole this shot from ebay I think it was.
After a bit of research I found a company called GHQ, making these model tractors in HO: Blockedhttp://www.ghqmodels.com/store/60001.html
Fred Jansz


Re: FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

Douglas Harding
 

Lloyd the WCFN was an interurban in eastern Iowa. http://www.r2parks.net/WCF&N.html

They had a small fleet of freight cars. The Jan 1941 ORER shows a total of 87 cars, 25 gons, 29 Auto boxcars, and the rest were flat cars.

The car in the photo is from the 4000-4024 series, 25 cars. The last digit of the car number is in the shadow, it looks to be a 6 or 8. These were their largest flatcars. The cars were 48’6” in length & 10’3” in extreme width.

These cars are not listed in the June 1917 ORER.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Lloyd Keyser
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2020 11:23 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

 

I would like to know more about that flat car. It appears to be on Andrews trucks

Lloyd Keyser

 

On Sat, Apr 18, 2020 at 7:57 AM Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

Sounds like the best way to way to go is to check the business listings in phone books for the year you model in the towns you model and see what you find. Another resource here in Iowa is centennial books – many towns and counties issued them in conjunction with their centennial.  While finding centennial books in public libraries has been easy, finding period phone books has been challenging.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Friday, April 17, 2020 11:41 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

 

On Fri, Apr 17, 2020 at 11:58 AM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

With all this talk of tractor loads, I'm wondering if there were regional followings for either Farmall red or John Deere green. I remember seeing mostly red in Indiana in the 1940 and 1950 on visits to the grandparent's farm. With plants in Moline and Waterloo, would John Deere be more prevalent in Iowa than Farmall?

Jim Ogden touched on this but let me add, it's more granular than that. It didn't really matter where the factory was - the factory could ship nationwide - that's why we see photos of tractors on flatcars. What really mattered is where their distributors were. You're not going to see a flatcar load of green tractors spotted at the team track ramp of a town with only an IH distributorship. That would be red tractor territory. Farmers tended to buy what they could easily get serviced. No sense buying a tractor from a dealer two towns over unless the price was really good. The overlap between territories has of course expanded as highways have gotten better, but that regionallity does still exist. Case in point, when I used to drive US 20 out to Freeport every six weeks or so, I'd pass a New Holland dealer about halfway between Rockford and Freeport. That area is the only place I ever recall seeing New Holland equipment working the fields.

Dennis Storzek

 


Re: FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

Fred Jansz
 

I once stole this shot from ebay I think it was.
After a bit of research I found a company called GHQ, making these model tractors in HO: http://www.ghqmodels.com/store/60001.html
Fred Jansz


Re: Photo: Purina Chows Mill Structure, Minneapolis

Bob Chaparro
 

I probably should add that I have seen this text on retail structures.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

Steve and Barb Hile
 

The whole Letter series of Farmall tractors were lettered A - M by size, with not all letters used.  The larger ones, the M's and H's were built in Rock Island at the Farmall plant.  Some of the smaller tractors, the A's B's and C's etc.were built in Louisville.
 
Steve Hile



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Douglas Harding
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2020 1:46 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

The Lifelike (now Walthers) tractor is a Farmall Super M-TA, first offered in 1954. The TA stood for Torque Amplifier, which had a two speed power shift, doubling the number of forward and reverse gears. It was a row crop tractor, ie had the narrow front end. But was also offered with the wide front end, sometimes called an orchard or vegetable tractor. The M was first offered in 1939, the Super M (more horsepower) in 1952. The M was slightly larger than the H. Attached is a photo of a load of Ms on a Waterloo Cedar Falls and Northern flatcar. The photo at Alton is a load of Hs. Note the difference in the loading positions, and the seat positions. The Alton photo also shows how the exhaust stacks were covered to prevent water from entering while in transit. Almost every farmer placed an empty tin can on the stack when they shut off the tractor. Notice the Ms have a hinged stack cover eliminating the need for the tin can.

 

Some Farmall tractors were also built at the IH plant in Louisville Kentucky. Farmall was a brand name of McCormick Deering, which was part of International Harvester.

 

The Walthers green version is foobie. Regular production Farmalls were never painted green. Nor did they look like John Deeres or Olivers (the other green tractor)

 

Oddballs at one time offered decals for the Lifelike tractor. But have been long out of production. I found a few sets last summer at a hobby shop that buys estates. Owner did not even know she had them.

 

Here are a few other Tractors I recall seeing often in Iowa:

John Deere, tractor works at Waterloo IA. Largest tractor factory in the world. Painted Green. This factory was the home of the Waterloo Boy, which John Deere purchased because their own tractor design was not working. That is how John Deere acquired the Waterloo location.

Oliver, built in Charles City, Iowa and painted green and white (a different green)

White, purchased Oliver, Cockshutt and Minneapolis-Moline and built at the Charles City IA plant

Minneapolis-Moline, built in Hopkins MN and painted yellow

Massey-Harris, made in Canada, painted red & yellow

Massey –Ferguson

Case made in Racine WI, cream and red colored.

Fords, grey or blue

Allis Chalmers, West Allis WI, an orange red color. Though some early tractors were green.

 

For more information on farm tractors go to https://www.tractordata.com/farm-tractors/index.html

 

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

 


Re: ARA Alternate Boxcars for Georgia & Florida

Benjamin Hom
 

George Courtney asked:
"I've lost my "Essential Freight Cars" RMC copy of Culotta's article on the MP, Georgia & Florida & KCS among others Alternate ARA  boxcars. And the Sunshine reference site is off-line.  Does anyone know the interior height of the Georgia & Florida boxcars in this group?"

8 ft 6 in.


Ben Hom



Re: FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

Dennis Storzek
 

On Sat, Apr 18, 2020 at 08:47 AM, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford wrote:
The tractors in question are probably very small garden tractors in 1:64, but are about the same size as most HO scale models. From the features like the grill, red color, and some VERY tiny graphics above the motor , I think they represent a small Farmall. The two I own have wide front axles, and the body is offset to the left (from the driver's position), while the seat and steering wheel are on the right side of the body.
That offset body with the steering column running past the right side of the hood is the hallmark of the Farmall "Cub", which was sold as a light duty tractor for plowing the garden etc. Too bad they are not HO scale or else they would be a viable flatcar load, although it would take a LOT of tractors.

Dennis Storzek


Photo: Purina Chows Mill Structure, Minneapolis

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Purina Chows Mill Structure, Minneapolis

A 1939 photo from the Library of Congress:

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2017809755/

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

This is the first Purina sign I've seen with this specific text.

Note the stacks of grain doors. MILW boxcar 700413 is to the right.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Broadway Limited Tank cars

Tim O'Connor
 


I think after 1948 (+/-) open grid steel walkways were required. Previous to that
time walkways could be wood or SOLID steel (e.g. diamond tread). As far as I know
there was no immediate replacement requirement for older tank cars.

I think the prototype for the BLI tank cars is from before the rule change - like
the Atlas 11k ICC105 tank car. The Kadee tank car is after the rule change. Tangent
also makes post-1948 GATC tank cars with open grid walkways.

Tim O'Connor



On 4/17/2020 5:37 PM, Allen Cain wrote:
has anyone attempted to replace the "wood" walkways on Broadway Limited tank cars with "metal" walkways?

And would this modification be appropriate for tank cars in the early to mid 1950's or were wood walk ways still in use?

Allen Cain

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


ARA Alternate Boxcars for Georgia & Florida

George Courtney
 

I've lost my "Essential Freight Cars" RMC copy of Culotta's article on the MP, Georgia & Florida & KCS among others Alternate ARA  boxcars. And the Sunshine reference site is off-line.  Does anyone know the interior height of the Georgia & Florida boxcars in this group?

Thanks.
George Courtney


Re: Barriger Library AC&F Photos

Dave Parker
 

On Sat, Apr 18, 2020 at 08:54 AM, Thomas Evans wrote:
Does anyone know if there is a way to search or limit by type, railroad, year or anything?
The short answer is no, the search capabilities here are almost nonexistent.

The one exception is that you can (usually?) search the ACF photos by lot number.  For example, the first photo in David's post can be found by searching with "ACF 2521".  It's great if you know the lot number, but otherwise...
 
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

Lloyd Keyser
 

I would like to know more about that flat car. It appears to be on Andrews trucks
Lloyd Keyser

On Sat, Apr 18, 2020 at 7:57 AM Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

Sounds like the best way to way to go is to check the business listings in phone books for the year you model in the towns you model and see what you find. Another resource here in Iowa is centennial books – many towns and counties issued them in conjunction with their centennial.  While finding centennial books in public libraries has been easy, finding period phone books has been challenging.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Friday, April 17, 2020 11:41 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

 

On Fri, Apr 17, 2020 at 11:58 AM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

With all this talk of tractor loads, I'm wondering if there were regional followings for either Farmall red or John Deere green. I remember seeing mostly red in Indiana in the 1940 and 1950 on visits to the grandparent's farm. With plants in Moline and Waterloo, would John Deere be more prevalent in Iowa than Farmall?

Jim Ogden touched on this but let me add, it's more granular than that. It didn't really matter where the factory was - the factory could ship nationwide - that's why we see photos of tractors on flatcars. What really mattered is where their distributors were. You're not going to see a flatcar load of green tractors spotted at the team track ramp of a town with only an IH distributorship. That would be red tractor territory. Farmers tended to buy what they could easily get serviced. No sense buying a tractor from a dealer two towns over unless the price was really good. The overlap between territories has of course expanded as highways have gotten better, but that regionallity does still exist. Case in point, when I used to drive US 20 out to Freeport every six weeks or so, I'd pass a New Holland dealer about halfway between Rockford and Freeport. That area is the only place I ever recall seeing New Holland equipment working the fields.

Dennis Storzek

 


Re: Barriger Library AC&F Photos

Thomas Evans
 

Some great stuff here, but everything is all mushed together in this collection.
Does anyone know if there is a way to search or limit by type, railroad, year or anything?

Tom E.


Re: FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Don and Dave,

I suspect that these items are too low-value to list, and are also more like impulse items. I have two identical pieces I picked up at TS a few years back, and I think they are still being offered.

The Tractor Supply pieces are die cast Ertl (or there successor) toys from bins near the front of their stores. The tractors in question are probably very small garden tractors in 1:64, but are about the same size as most HO scale models. From the features like the grill, red color, and some VERY tiny graphics above the motor , I think they represent a small Farmall. The two I own have wide front axles, and the body is offset to the left (from the driver's position), while the seat and steering wheel are on the right side of the body. Detail is pretty good, except for a solid steering wheel and a big loop "hitch" for matching attachments. For background use, they are fine, but I wouldn't put them up front on my layout (well, it's all up front in a way, being only 18" deep!). If you want something better for front of the layout use, go with the red version of the Lifelike/Walthers piece we've been discussing.

A few years ago Hallmark had a neat line of annual classic tractor Christmas ornaments. The models were generally the wrong color, and some features were clunky (including a little loop to hang them from the tree), but they were approximately HO scale and represented some really neat tractors that nobody ever offered as scale models, including a Minneapolis-Moline and a couple of others with lugged wheels I can't quite identify. I picked up half a dozen different types before the line was discontinued (I think there at least a dozen). You can probably still find these on eBay, and there are some resellers who vend discontinued Hallmark ornaments at antique malls. Hallmark was featuring a line of classic autos just before all the stores in our area all went under. The only one I scored was a 1950s Austin Healey or a Triumph sports car. Nice little auto with acceptable detail, and not one you will often see on a layout.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


On Sat, Apr 18, 2020 at 10:14 AM Donald B. Valentine via groups.io <riverman_vt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Dave,

    Sorry but I don't have a link to anything from Tractor Supply. The two of their stores 
I've been in have always had a display case fairly close to the checkout counter in 
which I first found such things while waiting to check out myself. Many real farm
supply stores have such things and often have usable sized animals or farm 
implements as well. The best thing I can suggest is to stop at any you see just to check.
what they might have. I've also seen such things in Aubuchon Hardware stores in New 
England.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: 1/16 x 1/16 brass angle stock

Joseph Melhorn
 

You might try:

https://www.hobbylinc.com/htm/k+s/k+s815003.htm

Joe Melhorn

Sahuarita, AZ