Date   

Re: Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

Tony Thompson
 

John La Rue Jr wrote:

Incidentally, neither Rodger nor Enterprise, the two main sellers of ballast cars,  manufacturers in their own right. They were offices where they took orders, designed the cars, and then had them made by whoever quoted the lowest price.

      I'm glad John pointed this out, as many modelers seem not to know it. Small correction, though: the buyer picked the builder, though the builder used Rodger or Enterprise blue prints and of course paid a royalty.

Tony Thompson




Re: Moloco instructions

Douglas Harding
 

Don I suspect Clark means this model, or one of the other offerings from moloco trains

https://www.molocotrains.com/products/res51001-undec-kit-pcf-50-rbl-plt-b-10-0-offset-door?variant=31098309410921

 

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Donald B. Valentine via groups.io
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 10:40 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Moloco instructions

 

Clark Propst wrote:

 

"I have an undec Moloco RBL to build for a friend. There's no instructions in the kit box. Anyone 

have any, or know how to get them?
Thanks alot!"

 

Uhhhh, Are you sure this is an RBL kit Clark?  In Russian  Moloco is milk so it would seem it should 

be a BM, BMR or BMT. If it would help I could photograph my Feniks made HO model of a Russian

"Moloco" insulated tank car and post it if I could figure out how to post photos here. Actually some 

Russian freight equipment is rather neat, and looks like it was made from drawings right out of a 

CarBuilders Cyclopedia which in fact some of it was!

 

Cheers, Don Valentine

 

 


Re: Moloco instructions

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

Clark Propst wrote:

"I have an undec Moloco RBL to build for a friend. There's no instructions in the kit box. Anyone 
have any, or know how to get them?
Thanks alot!"

Uhhhh, Are you sure this is an RBL kit Clark?  In Russian  Moloco is milk so it would seem it should 
be a BM, BMR or BMT. If it would help I could photograph my Feniks made HO model of a Russian
"Moloco" insulated tank car and post it if I could figure out how to post photos here. Actually some 
Russian freight equipment is rather neat, and looks like it was made from drawings right out of a 
CarBuilders Cyclopedia which in fact some of it was!

Cheers, Don Valentine




Re: Moloco instructions

Clark Propst
 

Thanks for the link. I was able to download the instructions. Not good at navigating websites...
CW Propst


Re: Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, May 8, 2020 at 01:14 PM, Riverboy wrote:
So ballast hopper were purpose built for such service? I always thought they were rebuilt by the railroad or someone from standard hoppers.
Just catching up... Someone has finally hung a name on these, they are Hart Selective ballast cars, marketed by the Rodgers Ballast Car Co. In the photo of NP 85020 you can just barely see the cast iron patent plat to the left of the capacity data. The 70 ton cars, and the shorter 50 ton cars that came before them, were essentially the standard railroad ballast car from the thirties through the sixties. The diagram Jim Dick posted shows the advantage of the design; a nice easily controlled flow of ballast placed just where needed without burying the track to the rail heads. These cars were a direct descendant of the Hart Selective gondola, common before WWI.

The rebuilt cars came later. The general move to 100 ton capacity freight cars in the seventies left the railroads with about a gazillion surplus 70 ton cement hoppers. Morrison Knudsen of Boise, Idaho developed and marketed an outlet gate that easily converted these cars to ballast service, and these conversions quickly became the standard ballast car of the late twentieth century, which is, of course, far in the future as far as this list is concerned.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

mofwcaboose <MOFWCABOOSE@...>
 

As noted previously, the ballast cars could be used for other loads, though their ballast doors, designed for unloading ballast in measured amounts, may not have been the quickest for unloading in bulk.

One problem with using ordinary hoppers for ballast was that once the hopper door was unlatched, the load quickly formed a substantial pile under the door that was big enough to derail the car. Positioning a cross tie ahead of the truck was one way to control this. 

Another method was to use a "ballast pan". This was a flat plate with narrow transverse slots in it, held in place under the door with chains. The pile of ballast formed on the pan, from which ballast in small amounts dribbled through the slots onto the track There were also appliances to hold the doors in partly opened position. But these were not the same as cars built with doors especially designed to dispense ballast where it was needed, as shown by the catalog page reproduced.

Incidentally, neither Rodger nor Enterprise, the two main sellers of ballast cars,  manufacturers in their own right. They were offices where they took orders, designed the cars, and then had them made by whoever quoted the lowest price.

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL




-----Original Message-----
From: spsalso via groups.io <Edwardsutorik@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Fri, May 8, 2020 9:14 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

There's an article on this type of car in RPC #3.

I quote: "...they could also be used to jaul coal, sugar beets, ore, gravel....The cars were oversized for the purpose of hauling ballast..."

It's been my belief that these type cars owned by a number of the western roads were bought to be dual purpose.  Or perhaps "multipurpose".



Ed

Edward Sutorik


Re: Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

Robert Heninger
 

Here is a photo of GN’s 1953 built ACF Hart ballast hoppers being used in sugar beet loading.

http://digitalhorizonsonline.org/digital/collection/shemorry/id/8906/rec/21

Regards, 
Bob Heninger
Minot, ND


Re: Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

Ted Schnepf
 

Hello,

I remeber working in the MOW department and In October getting a message, to unload all ballast hoppers and release them for use in hauling coal and sugar beats.

Almost all the cars were considered dual use during very busy periods.

In latter years the cars with MK doors were only used in ballast service.

Ted Schnepf
126 Will Scarlet,
Elgin, Ill. 60120


847=697-5353

On Friday, May 8, 2020, 03:14:29 PM CDT, Riverboy via groups.io <river_dweller_ohio@...> wrote:


So ballast hopper were purpose built for such service? I always thought they were rebuilt by the railroad or someone from standard hoppers. I guess I'm an old fool.... 

Tod C Dwyer
On Friday, May 8, 2020, 01:26:22 PM EDT, Hudson Leighton <hudsonl@...> wrote:


NP Ballast Car 85020


Re: Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

spsalso
 

There's an article on this type of car in RPC #3.

I quote: "...they could also be used to jaul coal, sugar beets, ore, gravel....The cars were oversized for the purpose of hauling ballast..."

It's been my belief that these type cars owned by a number of the western roads were bought to be dual purpose.  Or perhaps "multipurpose".



Ed

Edward Sutorik


Re: Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

np328
 

Of the NP, the cars were purpose bought, for both coal and ballast use.

       Per a recent anthracite string on another io group, I mentioned on the Northern Pacific that coal came very strong out of the Twin Ports of Duluth and Superior to the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, so much so that into the early 1960s it was the number one commodity of traffic in or out of the ports on at least the NP. This traffic added quite well to the NP’s bottom line and with the Milwaukee Railroad running on trackage rights made both the tonnage and number of trains running on this section of track considerable.

A 1951 financial report stated this part of the NP as “indispensable” due to the traffic hauled and again, lists the traffic as “quite substantial”.

Prior to 1951 the NP President had commissioned a report in 1930 that was updated in 1939 (attachment) then added to again up to the mid 1950’s on cars best suited for this coal trade (next two attachments).  In the report is the admonishment that the needs of coal traffic from the Twin Ports to the Twin Cities were paramount to open top car purchasing decisions. That report and from the later additions is where the last attached image was found. It was a sales brochure demonstrating how this car could be unloaded.                                                                                         Jim Dick -St. Paul 


Re: Moloco instructions

tyesac@aol.com <tyesac@...>
 




-----Original Message-----
From: Clark Propst <cepropst@q.com>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Fri, May 8, 2020 2:05 pm
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Moloco instructions

I have an undec Moloco RBL to build for a friend. There's no instructions in the kit box. Anyone have any, or know how to get them?
Thanks alot!
CW Propst


Re: Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

Todd Sullivan
 

Hi Tod,

No such thing as being an old fool.  I've been in the hobby for over 60 years, and every day I learn something new.  That's one of the delightful things that keeps me in the hobby.

Todd Sullivan


Re: Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

Bruce Smith
 

As Tony says, many railroads used regular hoppers for ballast. Indeed, when I worked on a section gang summers in college, that is what we did. We would chain a tie in front of the wheels of the rear truck, open the hopper and use the tie to spread the ballast.

And, just to muddy the waters, some railroads built or purchased hoppers with longitudinal doors for coal and coke service. This tended to be early in the 20th century when facilities to unload were less sophisticated and a hopper that dumped away from or beside the rails could be desirable. It should come as no surprise that these coal hoppers often had a second life as ballast hoppers. An excellent example are the PRR’s GP and GPA classes of hopper. I know that the B&O also had a class of side dumping coal hopper.

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL



On May 8, 2020, at 3:58 PM, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:

So ballast hopper were purpose built for such service? I always thought they were rebuilt by the railroad or someone from standard hoppers. I guess I'm an old fool…. 

    No, some railroads used regular cross hoppers for ballast, but cars like the NP one shown were indeed purpose-built, and you can see the ballast doors permitted dumping outside the rails as well as inside, just what you need for ballasting work.

Tony Thompson





Re: Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

Tony Thompson
 

So ballast hopper were purpose built for such service? I always thought they were rebuilt by the railroad or someone from standard hoppers. I guess I'm an old fool…. 

    No, some railroads used regular cross hoppers for ballast, but cars like the NP one shown were indeed purpose-built, and you can see the ballast doors permitted dumping outside the rails as well as inside, just what you need for ballasting work.

Tony Thompson




Re: Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

Benjamin Hom
 

Tod C Dwyer wrote:
"So ballast hopper[s] were purpose built for such service? I always thought they were rebuilt by the railroad or someone from standard hoppers. I guess I'm an old fool...."

Actually, it was a combination of all three - some were purpose built with longitudinal hoppers; some were converted from standard hoppers with changes in slope sheet angle and discharge gates, and some railroads pressed regular hoppers into service with partially open doors and a tie wedged under the wheels of the car to spread the ballast as the train moves.


Ben Hom


Re: Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

Riverboy
 

So ballast hopper were purpose built for such service? I always thought they were rebuilt by the railroad or someone from standard hoppers. I guess I'm an old fool.... 

Tod C Dwyer

On Friday, May 8, 2020, 01:26:22 PM EDT, Hudson Leighton <hudsonl@...> wrote:


NP Ballast Car 85020


New York circa 1910. "Williamsburg Bridge and East River waterfront.

Hudson Leighton <hudsonl@...>
 

On Shorpy: New York circa 1910. "Williamsburg Bridge and East River waterfront.

Several loaded carfloats.

https://www.shorpy.com/node/25590

-Hudson


Re: Moloco instructions

BRIAN PAUL EHNI
 

Go to his website https://www.molocotrains.com/ and click on Freight Cars. Find your kit. On that page will be a link to comprehensive instructions. For example: https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1032/8967/files/MOLOCO_GA_50_RBL_kit_instructions_revA.pdf?12443893425265014117

 

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Clark Propst <cepropst@q.com>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Friday, May 8, 2020 at 2:05 PM
To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Moloco instructions

 

I have an undec Moloco RBL to build for a friend. There's no instructions in the kit box. Anyone have any, or know how to get them?
Thanks alot!
CW Propst


Moloco instructions

Clark Propst
 

I have an undec Moloco RBL to build for a friend. There's no instructions in the kit box. Anyone have any, or know how to get them?
Thanks alot!
CW Propst


Re: COHS PM Decals

Chet
 

Smokebox Graphics also offer an Ann Arbor box car set which will do four cars.  The set covers the 1950's.  A Buffalo Creek set which will do two cars.  Early 1950's.
and a New Haven set for a 1955 reblt 1937 AAR car  in the orange scheme with the large NH.  He was at the Chicagoland meet a few years ago and I purchased the
Ann Arbor set then.

Chet French
Dixon, IL

8281 - 8300 of 181108