Date   

RI 1944 AAR Boxcar -- C&BT Upgrade #2

Bob Chapman
 

Here's the second of the six C&BT 1944 AAR boxcars rescued from the bottom of the unbuilt kit stash, upgraded with contemporary parts.

This one is C&BT's 12-panel carbody variation. Key detail parts include Yarmouth US Gypsum running board, Kadee ladders/grabs/brakewheel, Tahoe Barber S-2's, and Mask Island decals. Always liked Rock Island -- it definitely rocks. 

Regards,
Bob Chapman


Re: Oyster Cars

Bob Chaparro
 

Bruce Hendrick of Brea, CA, commented:

"To build this car today I would think scratch-building in Evergreen styrene would be far easier than the wood & metal kit in the unlikely event one could be found. Printing the zero perspective Smithsonian photo and the kit instructions diagram to the proper scale provides a workable template.

If I were to build this I would seek out a 36’ gondola or reefer as a donor for floor, underframe, truss-rods, and such. Does anyone make the proper trucks or something close?

A question. I do not recall seeing a North American freight car “numbered” with letters. Can someone explain how these cars came to be A, B, and C?"


Re: Oyster Cars

erieblt2
 

The LIRR had regular ‘fisher-man’ trains East that included modified combines/baggage cars with internal tanks, and coolers for the catches. No visual outside differences-except some small signs to inform the fishermen. The tiny town of Blue Point had oysters that were considered one of the best. The LIRR ran regular reefers daily from the Blue Point (&East) to the city in the 1890’s. I hope they were dedicated cars. Oyster smell and produce don’t mix well! I know of no reefer photos of the cars used. William Smith


On May 9, 2020, at 10:42 AM, Jon Miller <atsfus@...> wrote:


On 5/9/2020 10:34 AM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:
And here are some models as seen on WorthPoint:

    The middle one is Red Ball and I would guess there might be a lot of these kits around, someplace!:-D

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Oyster Cars

Jon Miller
 

On 5/9/2020 10:34 AM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:
And here are some models as seen on WorthPoint:

    The middle one is Red Ball and I would guess there might be a lot of these kits around, someplace!:-D

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Oyster Cars

Bob Chaparro
 

Oyster Cars

Here is a modeling article from the Cannon Ball, the official publication of the Sunrise Trail Division/NMRA:

http://sunrisetraildiv.nernmra.org/Cannonballs/4403Fall2014.pdf

The article starts on Page 1.

And here are some models as seen on WorthPoint:

https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/ho-scale-custom-kcp-32-stilwell-1825096945

https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/ho-hon3-stilwell-oyster-car-wood-cast-1864614923

https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/ho-craftsman-kcp-stilwell-oyster-car-2021794799

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group (Including Fish & Salt Water Bivalve Mollusks)

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Re: Moloco instructions

Craig Wilson
 

Ok Don ... I get the "tongue in cheek" reference even if not everyone will.  And "MOLOCO" is also Australian for (Nick) Molo-Company.  I bought my first kit from him sitting in Dan Holbrook's garage "crew lounge" years ago.

Speaking of Moloco RBL's, I have a couple of the undec kits (one centered doors, one off-set doors) that will never get built since Nick produced RTR versions of the cars I would have used them for.  I'd be willing to part with them if anyone wanted to make me a reasonable offer (off list please).

Craig Wilson


Re: Photo: Hopper Car At Fish Company

Steve SANDIFER
 

Great info. Thanks.

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of San Antonio & San Francisco
Sent: Saturday, May 9, 2020 8:25 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Hopper Car At Fish Company

 

J, et al,

Actually, there were three Stillwell Oyster Cars that were built. Car A, Car B, and Car C. Cars B and C were involved in a train wreck enroute to the railroad from the builder and were completely destroyed and never replaced. Car A survived and was used for a short time, however, was discontinued because the loading and unloading process and the inability to keep the oysters fresh by changing out the water in the brine tanks brought about its demise. There are great pictures of Car A, however B and C may not exist. I've post up pictures of Car A for everyone. I am having the top vents and decals made for all three cars. Cars were painted dark blue, which is very rare for the era, as blue pigment paints were not readily available and the pigments didn't last under the effects of the sun. Letting is either white or silver.

Levi


Re: New York circa 1910. "Williamsburg Bridge and East River waterfront.

Andy Brusgard <ajb1102@...>
 

On Fri, May 8, 2020 at 12:50 PM, Hudson Leighton wrote:
https://www.shorpy.com/node/25590
What a great photograph. The clarity of the 8 x 10 glass plate negative is remarkable. A lot of interesting details. Can't make out the name on float barges, but appears to be 12 letters - Pennsylvania?  All the way on right - two tugs towing at least three sailing ships. New York require this as ships under sail were difficult to control in the harbor traffic.  


Re: New York circa 1910. "Williamsburg Bridge and East River waterfront.

Thomas Evans
 

As usual, you should be able to get a higher resolution scan of this photo from the Library of Congress site.
I've not tried with this one, but the information needed to find it should be in the Shorpy description:
"Williamsburg Bridge and East River waterfront."

Tom E.


Re: Photo: Hopper Car At Fish Company

San Antonio & San Francisco <sanantonio-sanfrancisco@...>
 

J, et al,

Actually, there were three Stillwell Oyster Cars that were built. Car A, Car B, and Car C. Cars B and C were involved in a train wreck enroute to the railroad from the builder and were completely destroyed and never replaced. Car A survived and was used for a short time, however, was discontinued because the loading and unloading process and the inability to keep the oysters fresh by changing out the water in the brine tanks brought about its demise. There are great pictures of Car A, however B and C may not exist. I've post up pictures of Car A for everyone. I am having the top vents and decals made for all three cars. Cars were painted dark blue, which is very rare for the era, as blue pigment paints were not readily available and the pigments didn't last under the effects of the sun. Letting is either white or silver.

Levi


Re: Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

Hudson Leighton <hudsonl@...>
 

The NP Ry. records list these as ACF cars.

-Hudson


Re: Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

Tony Thompson
 

John La Rue Jr wrote:

Incidentally, neither Rodger nor Enterprise, the two main sellers of ballast cars,  manufacturers in their own right. They were offices where they took orders, designed the cars, and then had them made by whoever quoted the lowest price.

      I'm glad John pointed this out, as many modelers seem not to know it. Small correction, though: the buyer picked the builder, though the builder used Rodger or Enterprise blue prints and of course paid a royalty.

Tony Thompson




Re: Moloco instructions

Douglas Harding
 

Don I suspect Clark means this model, or one of the other offerings from moloco trains

https://www.molocotrains.com/products/res51001-undec-kit-pcf-50-rbl-plt-b-10-0-offset-door?variant=31098309410921

 

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Donald B. Valentine via groups.io
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 10:40 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Moloco instructions

 

Clark Propst wrote:

 

"I have an undec Moloco RBL to build for a friend. There's no instructions in the kit box. Anyone 

have any, or know how to get them?
Thanks alot!"

 

Uhhhh, Are you sure this is an RBL kit Clark?  In Russian  Moloco is milk so it would seem it should 

be a BM, BMR or BMT. If it would help I could photograph my Feniks made HO model of a Russian

"Moloco" insulated tank car and post it if I could figure out how to post photos here. Actually some 

Russian freight equipment is rather neat, and looks like it was made from drawings right out of a 

CarBuilders Cyclopedia which in fact some of it was!

 

Cheers, Don Valentine

 

 


Re: Moloco instructions

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

Clark Propst wrote:

"I have an undec Moloco RBL to build for a friend. There's no instructions in the kit box. Anyone 
have any, or know how to get them?
Thanks alot!"

Uhhhh, Are you sure this is an RBL kit Clark?  In Russian  Moloco is milk so it would seem it should 
be a BM, BMR or BMT. If it would help I could photograph my Feniks made HO model of a Russian
"Moloco" insulated tank car and post it if I could figure out how to post photos here. Actually some 
Russian freight equipment is rather neat, and looks like it was made from drawings right out of a 
CarBuilders Cyclopedia which in fact some of it was!

Cheers, Don Valentine




Re: Moloco instructions

Clark Propst
 

Thanks for the link. I was able to download the instructions. Not good at navigating websites...
CW Propst


Re: Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, May 8, 2020 at 01:14 PM, Riverboy wrote:
So ballast hopper were purpose built for such service? I always thought they were rebuilt by the railroad or someone from standard hoppers.
Just catching up... Someone has finally hung a name on these, they are Hart Selective ballast cars, marketed by the Rodgers Ballast Car Co. In the photo of NP 85020 you can just barely see the cast iron patent plat to the left of the capacity data. The 70 ton cars, and the shorter 50 ton cars that came before them, were essentially the standard railroad ballast car from the thirties through the sixties. The diagram Jim Dick posted shows the advantage of the design; a nice easily controlled flow of ballast placed just where needed without burying the track to the rail heads. These cars were a direct descendant of the Hart Selective gondola, common before WWI.

The rebuilt cars came later. The general move to 100 ton capacity freight cars in the seventies left the railroads with about a gazillion surplus 70 ton cement hoppers. Morrison Knudsen of Boise, Idaho developed and marketed an outlet gate that easily converted these cars to ballast service, and these conversions quickly became the standard ballast car of the late twentieth century, which is, of course, far in the future as far as this list is concerned.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

mofwcaboose <MOFWCABOOSE@...>
 

As noted previously, the ballast cars could be used for other loads, though their ballast doors, designed for unloading ballast in measured amounts, may not have been the quickest for unloading in bulk.

One problem with using ordinary hoppers for ballast was that once the hopper door was unlatched, the load quickly formed a substantial pile under the door that was big enough to derail the car. Positioning a cross tie ahead of the truck was one way to control this. 

Another method was to use a "ballast pan". This was a flat plate with narrow transverse slots in it, held in place under the door with chains. The pile of ballast formed on the pan, from which ballast in small amounts dribbled through the slots onto the track There were also appliances to hold the doors in partly opened position. But these were not the same as cars built with doors especially designed to dispense ballast where it was needed, as shown by the catalog page reproduced.

Incidentally, neither Rodger nor Enterprise, the two main sellers of ballast cars,  manufacturers in their own right. They were offices where they took orders, designed the cars, and then had them made by whoever quoted the lowest price.

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL




-----Original Message-----
From: spsalso via groups.io <Edwardsutorik@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Fri, May 8, 2020 9:14 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

There's an article on this type of car in RPC #3.

I quote: "...they could also be used to jaul coal, sugar beets, ore, gravel....The cars were oversized for the purpose of hauling ballast..."

It's been my belief that these type cars owned by a number of the western roads were bought to be dual purpose.  Or perhaps "multipurpose".



Ed

Edward Sutorik


Re: Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

Robert Heninger
 

Here is a photo of GN’s 1953 built ACF Hart ballast hoppers being used in sugar beet loading.

http://digitalhorizonsonline.org/digital/collection/shemorry/id/8906/rec/21

Regards, 
Bob Heninger
Minot, ND


Re: Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

Ted Schnepf
 

Hello,

I remeber working in the MOW department and In October getting a message, to unload all ballast hoppers and release them for use in hauling coal and sugar beats.

Almost all the cars were considered dual use during very busy periods.

In latter years the cars with MK doors were only used in ballast service.

Ted Schnepf
126 Will Scarlet,
Elgin, Ill. 60120


847=697-5353

On Friday, May 8, 2020, 03:14:29 PM CDT, Riverboy via groups.io <river_dweller_ohio@...> wrote:


So ballast hopper were purpose built for such service? I always thought they were rebuilt by the railroad or someone from standard hoppers. I guess I'm an old fool.... 

Tod C Dwyer
On Friday, May 8, 2020, 01:26:22 PM EDT, Hudson Leighton <hudsonl@...> wrote:


NP Ballast Car 85020


Re: Photo: NP Ballast Car 85020

spsalso
 

There's an article on this type of car in RPC #3.

I quote: "...they could also be used to jaul coal, sugar beets, ore, gravel....The cars were oversized for the purpose of hauling ballast..."

It's been my belief that these type cars owned by a number of the western roads were bought to be dual purpose.  Or perhaps "multipurpose".



Ed

Edward Sutorik

8301 - 8320 of 181139