Date   

Interesting flat car loads circa 1931-32

Brian Rochon
 

From Steamtown/Erie-Lackawanna site today.  Images are too washed out to read reporting marks but the loads are very interesting.

 

http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-01-17-20/X7844.jpg

http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-01-17-20/X7845.jpg

http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-01-17-20/X7846.jpg

 

Brian Rochon

Silver Spring, MD


Re: D&H 36-footer

Greg Bartek
 

Wow, phenomenal craftsmanship and modeling!! Stunning work Bill, thanks for posting.

Greg Bartek


Re: Shorty automobile car - 1913

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Friends,

Though it might seem surprising, Henry built a lot of his Model T autos in England. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_of_Britain . The photo in question is probably from the Trafford Park plant near Manchester, based on the design features of the cars. The more famous site at Dagenham dates to 1929.

Great Britain was a booming market. Several vintage Fords including a Model T truck can be noted in the Downton Abbey TV series. That is, if you can tear your eyes away from the Rolls Royces, Bentleys and those marvelous racing cars (which include a racing Bentley, along with a Bugatti). On one of the videos (season six, IIRC), there is even a special feature on the autos.

I learned to drive in an English Ford, a four-door 1962 Consul model 315 (an export model with the drive on the left, per US standards). Our Ford was similar to the flying car in the Harry Potter movies. My first car was a slightly smaller two-door 1957/1958 Ford Anglia, pieced together from two wrecks in someone's garage. Neither of these Fords could fly.

Yours Aye,

Garth Groff  🦆


On Fri, Jan 17, 2020 at 12:12 AM Patrick Wade <patwadesb@...> wrote:
The car on the loading ramp appears to have the steering wheel on the right, England?

Pat Wade
Santa Barbara

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020 at 5:58 PM Thomas Evans via Groups.Io <tomkevans=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Paul,

Here's a link to the photo as posted over on the early rail site.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/394918.jpg

The one at the dealer is the same although somewhat cropped.

Tom


Re: Shorty automobile car - 1913

Patrick Wade
 

The car on the loading ramp appears to have the steering wheel on the right, England?

Pat Wade
Santa Barbara

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020 at 5:58 PM Thomas Evans via Groups.Io <tomkevans=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Paul,

Here's a link to the photo as posted over on the early rail site.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/394918.jpg

The one at the dealer is the same although somewhat cropped.

Tom


Re: Shorty automobile car - 1913

Thomas Evans
 

Here is a link to the photo as posted over on the Early Rail site:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/394918.jpg

The one at the dealer is the same although somewhat cropped.

Tom


Offered: MDC puillman built DD SS 50' box car enhancement kit for MP/WP

Andy Carlson
 

Hello-

I have another enhancement kit being offered for sale. I have come upon several left over resin castings of a WP Pullman Co built 50' auto boxcar with pre-war Youngstown doors. Model Die Casting came out with a beautifully built car in HO tooled by Brian Leppert now of Tahoe Model Works fame. Brian was asked to make the siding with exaggerated board spacing grooves to fit in with the convention of-the-time that single sheathed cars needed to be super-obvious. Fine detailed modeling of these kits has been shared with this group; finished models with cast-on details removed and replaced with individual parts.

This enhanced kit I offer has the following:

1 new MDC 50' SS double door box car kit
1 pair of Western Pacific/Missouri Pacific polyurethane resin cast sides with subtle board grooves

The modeler will need to remove the sides from the kit's car body and replace with the supplied resin sides. I am not supplying hand grabs, ladders, decals or brake details. I am just supplying a labor saving pair of sides for swapping with the supplied MDC kit.

Offered for $29 which includes shipping to the US. I accept checks and with a small fee PayPal is welcomed. Please contact me off-list for details at <midcentury@...>.
Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA






AC&F and GE Built Portable Power Plants Berwick, PA Plant

NicholasF
 

Okay, anyone modeling the Northeast PA or NYC area during WW2, here ya go:

Power plants built for the Soviet Union in Berwick, PA:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/albums/72157712179496252/with/49395639568/

Pamphlet about the project:

https://dl.mospace.umsystem.edu/umsl/islandora/object/umsl%3A319442#page/1/mode/2up

-Nick Fry
Curator
John W. Barriger III National Railroad Library
UMSL


Re: Photo: UP Furniture Boxcar 50214

Bob Webber
 

I'm NOT trying to say this as an ass*ole - but...isn't the length directly under the number (just above capy)?   It appears to me to be the case, but it isn't all that clear, which is why I ask.     I'm not conversant with the era's lettering....

On Thursday, January 16, 2020, 12:10:17 PM CST, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:


Photo: UP Furniture Boxcar 50214
Circa 1905 photo:
http://collections.mnhs.org/cms/largerimage?irn=10117023&catirn=10743183&return=brand%3Dcms%26q%3Drailroad%26startindex%3D1901
Anyone know how long this car was?
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

Bob Webber


Re: Photo: UP Furniture Boxcar 50214

mofwcaboose
 

Inside length 50 feet, outside length 51 feet 4 inches (July 1915 ORER).

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL


-----Original Message-----
From: Gary Roe <wabashrr@...>
To: main <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Jan 16, 2020 2:19 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: UP Furniture Boxcar 50214

Bob,

Judging by the length of the bicycles, I'd say it was a 50' car.

gary roe
quincy, illinois



On Thursday, January 16, 2020, 12:10:17 PM CST, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:


Photo: UP Furniture Boxcar 50214
Circa 1905 photo:
Anyone know how long this car was?
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


D&H 36-footer

Bill Welch
 

The Boys at the Clearwater Car Shops have been busy getting several freight cars to the point to be painted. This is a Funaro & Camerlengo kit for a Delaware & Hudson 36-foot boxcar, many of which were in service into the 1950's. Many improvements: .005 styrene strips to complete Z-Bars on the ends; Grandt Line lift ring melted w/Testers for push pole pockets; .20 Tichy rivets for bolts/rivets. Note the bent/damaged roof flashing on the ends. Wine ladders scratch built using .010 Plastruct rod w/Athearn harvested rivets on the edge of the stiles serving as the ends of the interlocking ladder rungs. Small "V" shape cuts into the Hutchins roof ribs with Grandt Line NBWs on the ribs—more .010 styrene used to make small stamping in the middle of the roof panels. Largish Archer rivets on the underframe's center sill so maybe they can be seen in profile. The corner braces or gussets in photos I have appear to be heavier than typical so I used .010 x .030 strip styrene instead of .005 thick styrene for those parts. The small gussets on the re-enforcement under the door are .010 styrene rod; after they had cured I pinched them with my sprue cutting tweezers at an angle so they will look like triangles. Because there is white styrene on white or off-white resin, I manipulated the photos to increase the contrast so the styrene improvements can be seen more easily.

Bill Welch


Re: Photo: UP Furniture Boxcar 50214

Gary Roe
 

Bob,

Judging by the length of the bicycles, I'd say it was a 50' car.

gary roe
quincy, illinois



On Thursday, January 16, 2020, 12:10:17 PM CST, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:


Photo: UP Furniture Boxcar 50214

Circa 1905 photo:

http://collections.mnhs.org/cms/largerimage?irn=10117023&catirn=10743183&return=brand%3Dcms%26q%3Drailroad%26startindex%3D1901

Anyone know how long this car was?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Looking for any info about Linde (CCBX) gondolas #801-815 and the containers. #801-815

Tim O'Connor
 

Paul

I thought the price was for each one - since only one is shown. Also, for me a load is
at least 22 containers, so it's $44. Much better than 22x11 = 231.



On 1/15/2020 5:53 PM, Paul Woods wrote:
Tim, how did you get the figure of $250?  According to the website a set of 14 HO-scale containers runs at $31.50, S-scale is $73.25.  Is the freight a bit OTT?

Regards
Paul Woods
Whangarei, NZ

On Tue, Jan 14, 2020 at 04:17 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
Except at the prices, a load of calcium carbide containers runs about $250 or so.




toggle quoted messageShow quoted text

 

On 1/14/2020 7:08 PM, Elliot Courtney via Groups.Io wrote:
Steel mill modelers supply is producing these containers, they can be found on facebook or at http://steelmillmodelerssupply.com 

Elliot Courtney 
--
Tim O'Connor

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Photo: UP Furniture Boxcar 50214

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: UP Furniture Boxcar 50214

Circa 1905 photo:

http://collections.mnhs.org/cms/largerimage?irn=10117023&catirn=10743183&return=brand%3Dcms%26q%3Drailroad%26startindex%3D1901

Anyone know how long this car was?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: NYC Depressed Center Flat 499051

Bob Chaparro
 


Re: Behind the UTLX Dry bulk tank car

mopacfirst
 

On Wed, Jan 15, 2020 at 06:55 AM, Eric Hansmann wrote:

Murfreesboro, TN

 

I see a white MDT reefer with the hatches up, standing alone approximately across from the ex-express car in what I presume to be a work train.


Ron Merrick


Re: Caboose restrictions c1914

Rupert Gamlen
 

Dennis

Material relating to these waycars is very scant, and I can’t recall the BRHS publishing anything about these cars other than three photos and a diagram. Now that I have found the varied legislation for the states in which the Burlington operated, it helps to identify where the CB&Q four wheel waycars/cabooses were used and why. For example, Iowa and Missouri – two of the biggest states for CB&Q mileage - had no provision for the use of four wheel waycars in yard or transfer service, unlike Illinois.

Sorting through the legislation of the seven states in which the Soo operated will no doubt produce patterns depending on locations and date – they range in the Report from 1907 to 1913 – as to where the Soo could use its equipment.

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ


 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Thursday, 16 January 2020 5:21 p.m.
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Caboose restrictions c1914

 

On Wed, Jan 15, 2020 at 04:56 PM, Rupert Gamlen wrote:

The report includes the legislation from Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Indiana, Arkansas, Maine, Michigan, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Virginia, New Hampshire and Washington.

I wish I could remember where I read the info I cited earlier (requirement for steel centersill and a 26' minimum body length) which I recall was imposed by the ICC, but now that I read the above list, all seven states the Soo Line operated in are included, so it may have been simply based on state laws. However, the time period seems too early; The Soo didn't begin their rebuild program until 1924, and it continued until at least 1928. It is possible, I suppose, that implementation of the state laws was delayed by lawsuits by the railroads challenging the constitutionality of the state laws, which would require further research.

But this begs the question, what is the purpose of tracking down the source of the regulations? It seems the BRHS has published a lot of information over the years that should allow the type and construction of the cabooses in service at any given time period in any given local to be pretty well documented, and that's really what matters; if there are photos of cars running, that is what was running.

I suppose that's the reason why I've never put a lot of effort into documenting the reason for the rebuilding of the Soo Line fleet beyond the fact that I know it was completed before my ear of interest.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Photo: Staley Tank Cars

Robert J. Amsler, Jr.
 

 

I have attached a photograph of a MP boxcar being lifted and turned to clear it of grain.

 

Robert J. Amsler, Jr.

514 Dover Place

Saint Louis, Missouri 63111

(314) 606-6118  (Telephone)

(314) 754-2688  (Facsimile)

MPFan1@...

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Douglas Harding
Sent: Tuesday, January 14, 2020 8:31 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Staley Tank Cars

 

Here is an ad for a boxcar unloader device. You can see it tilts and rolls.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of pennsylvania1954
Sent: Monday, January 13, 2020 11:28 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Staley Tank Cars

 

On the page reached through Bob's second link, the fifth photo from the bottom, "Staley grain car dumper 1951", caught my attention. How does the grain get out of the rebuilt WABASH boxcar? Does that device roll the car as well as tilt it?
--
Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL


Re: Caboose restrictions c1914

Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Jan 15, 2020 at 04:56 PM, Rupert Gamlen wrote:
The report includes the legislation from Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Indiana, Arkansas, Maine, Michigan, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Virginia, New Hampshire and Washington.
I wish I could remember where I read the info I cited earlier (requirement for steel centersill and a 26' minimum body length) which I recall was imposed by the ICC, but now that I read the above list, all seven states the Soo Line operated in are included, so it may have been simply based on state laws. However, the time period seems too early; The Soo didn't begin their rebuild program until 1924, and it continued until at least 1928. It is possible, I suppose, that implementation of the state laws was delayed by lawsuits by the railroads challenging the constitutionality of the state laws, which would require further research.

But this begs the question, what is the purpose of tracking down the source of the regulations? It seems the BRHS has published a lot of information over the years that should allow the type and construction of the cabooses in service at any given time period in any given local to be pretty well documented, and that's really what matters; if there are photos of cars running, that is what was running.

I suppose that's the reason why I've never put a lot of effort into documenting the reason for the rebuilding of the Soo Line fleet beyond the fact that I know it was completed before my ear of interest.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Behind the UTLX Dry bulk tank car

rwitt_2000
 

The covered hopper kinda looks like a B&O N-25 rebuilt from their N-13 open-top hoppers.

Eric H. what do you think?

Bob Witt


Caboose restrictions c1914

Rupert Gamlen
 

I’ve found some of the individual states legislation on the construction of cabooses in the Bureau of Labor Statistics Report for 1914 at https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt/search?q1=caboose;id=hvd.hj2ajm;view=1up;seq=7  (part 1) and https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.a0004011052&view=1up&seq=9 (part 2)

Although the phraseology of the Acts is basically similar, there are wide variations in what was prescribed and permitted under the various Acts.  Of the eighteen states covered in the report, only one – New York – required steel center sills, while three or four related the construction strength of the caboose to MCB standards. There were also wide variations in the question of platforms, steps, rails and interior requirements, although all specified two four-wheel trucks. However, some Acts allowed existing equipment to be used until general repairs were required, others permitted their use in yard and local work, while the 1909 Illinois legislation provided -
          The provisions of this act shall not apply to the use of caboose cars in yard and in transfer service, nor to the use of caboose cars now owned
         by any railroad or railway company operating in this State.
At that time, there were 152 railroads (including subsidiaries and leased roads) operating in Illinois.

The report includes the legislation from Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Indiana, Arkansas, Maine, Michigan, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Virginia, New Hampshire and Washington.

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ