Date   

Re: Santa Fe Fe-24 and Fe-28 photos

mopacfirst
 

Here's what some of them looked like near the end: 

Many of them got sidesill reinforcement that looked basically as if they'd been built that way.  And I think these are still A-3 trucks.

Ron Merrick


Re: boxcars can be lined up on two tracks

Richard McQuade
 

Thanks. Just that it looks like it. I didn't know about the material you've mentioned.
Richard


Freight Classification for sale

Ted Schnepf
 

Hello,

I have one coppy of the Uniform Freight Classification #2; Ratings, Rules and Regulations issued Oct 12, 1953. 514 pages, 8x11", with soft covers.

The book appears to give definations to varous commidity groups.

Only have one copy. $20.00 plus $5.00 post if needed.

Rails Unlimited
Ted Schnepf
126 Will Scarlet,
Elgin, Ill. 60120

847=697-5353


Anthracite Hopper in S.W. Virginia Coal Fields

George Courtney
 

Recently there was talk about anthracite hoppers in Iowa, I believe.  Not Iowa, but far from home. 
https://www.railpictures.net/photo/426984/




George Courtney


Re: Santa Fe Fe-24 and Fe-28 photos

Benjamin Hom
 

Todd Sullivan asked:
"I have been looking on the web for several days trying to find clear photos of Santa Fe's class Fe-24 and Fe-28 50' double door boxcars.  I have a kit for each (P2K for Fe-24, Branchline for Fe-28), and I need to know what kind of trucks each one had, and check out other details before I proceed with the builds. Can anyone help?"

Richard Hendrickson's article in the October 1995 issue of Railmodel Journal has a Frank Ellington collection photo of an Fe-24 converted to express service still in freight lettering (pages 22-23).


Ben Hom


Re: Santa Fe Fe-24 and Fe-28 photos

Tony Thompson
 

Todd Sullivan wrote:

I have been looking on the web for several days trying to find clear photos of Santa Fe's class Fe-24 and Fe-28 50' double door boxcars.  I have a kit for each (P2K for Fe-24, Branchline for Fe-28), and I need to know what kind of trucks each one had, and check out other details before I proceed with the builds.

    The FE-24 cars got ASF A-3 trucks later (many were delivered with Allied Full Cushion). The -28s were delivered with A-3. This from the Hendrickson book on ATSF auto cars.

Tony Thompson




Santa Fe Fe-24 and Fe-28 photos

Todd Sullivan
 

I have been looking on the web for several days trying to find clear photos of Santa Fe's class Fe-24 and Fe-28 50' double door boxcars.  I have a kit for each (P2K for Fe-24, Branchline for Fe-28), and I need to know what kind of trucks each one had, and check out other details before I proceed with the builds.

Can anyone help?

Many thanks,

Todd Sullivan


Re: B&O P-25D in HO

Fran Giacoma
 

Great looking car, Jim. The weathering is superb and very realistic looking. I look forward to your article in Issue 52 of the B&O Modeler.

Fran Giacoma


Re: B&O P-25D in HO

Jim King
 

Thanks, Eric. 

 

I used Micro Scale’s TF-2 (black) which is shown as out of stock on their web site.  Any blank decal paper can be used, just paint it the color you want.  For my application, I taped off a small section of TF-2 with blue painter’s tape and shot the uncovered area with Rust-Oleum Crystal Clear Enamel to get a glossy finish.  When dry, I cut out panels sized to be a tad bigger than the “restenciled” characters and applied it like any other decal.  The white graphics went on next.  I’ve seen many examples of brown patches on black cars and the reverse.  Whatever the car shop guys had handy is what got used quite often.

 

Jim King

http://smokymountainmodelworks.com/

 


Re: Photo: WP Boxcar 20807

Fred Jansz
 

ERic Werner's RR Innovations (& Intermountain) did the three 1954 orange cars: 1963, 1965 and 1970. These are rare birds now.
Fred Jansz


Re: Photo: WP Boxcar 20807

Fred Jansz
 


Re: boxcars can be lined up on two tracks

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

   What makes you think the freight shed roof was tar paper covered? A heavier paper with granulated slate 
just like architect shingles have is available in roll form as well in the same width as a roll of tar paper and 
would make a lot more sense where something more than temporary covering was needed.

My best, Don Valentine


Re: Photo: WP Boxcar 20807

Richard Townsend
 

Who is ASM?


On Apr 24, 2020, at 10:52 AM, Fred Jansz <fred@...> wrote:

Thank you for saving my skin Tim.

ASM makes a very nice brass Chrysler truck, which is a steal especially for your wallet.

Now for completeness:

- 1951: WP 20801-20820; all silver, orange feather, slogan
- 1952: renumbered into 19501-19520

- 1951: WP 20821-21400; red w. black ends & roof
- 1952: 22 random cars renumbered into 19521-19542 and repainted; black ends & rood, silver sides w. orange feather & slogan

- May 1953: WP 19537 rebuilt by Pullman and fitted with Timken roller bearing trucks; silver roof & sides, black ends, 'roller freight' logo.

This last car was initiated a couple of years ago by Eric Werner (partly with my info) and built by Intermountain.
However, the car doesn't have the roller bearing trucks, which were supposed to be supplied by Rapido.

My question why Kadee never did the silver WP car with the feather is probably answered by the fact that there were no Chrysler trucks available.

Take care, cheers,
Fred Jansz
<roller freight wp.jpg>


Re: early CBQ cars

Charlie Vlk
 

Rupert and All-

A very neat photo!   I believe that this is the first C&I lettered car/equipment that I’ve seen.  Wonder what the line under the herald reads…too long for just C&I.   Maybe C&I LESSOR?

The panel on the door does indeed say AIR BRAKE as the lettering on 26519 is pretty visible.

Thanks,

Charlie

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rupert Gamlen
Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2020 9:23 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] early CBQ cars

 

Claus

Thanks for this link but I think it may be too old for some members.

Box car 26519 was built by Wells & French in 1891 (26503-26753), while 26259 behind it (if that is the correct number) was built the same year by Missouri Car & Foundry (26003-26502). Both were 34’ cars, and I think the light panel at the top of the side doors announces that they were equipped with air brakes. Both cars would be placed in class XM-3 when the company introduced classes in 1910-11.

The Burlington Route herald on the side of 26259 has the initials “CB&QRR” underneath, a practice which disappeared about the end of the century. Other companies within the Burlington group used the same herald but with their own initials.

The car to the left beyond the gondola (listed as a “coal car” up to 1905) is a Chicago & Iowa box car probably built in about 1880, with an inside length of 27’ 5½”. The company was leased to the Burlington on 1 January 1892 but the equipment was no longer listed in ORER’s by March 1894, which may help date the photo. The cars were renumbered variously as CB&Q 9564-9958 and the last one of this group survived until 1912.

If anyone can more accurately date the end use of company initials under the Burlington Route herald, I would be grateful to hear from them.

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Friday, 24 April 2020 11:19 am
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] early CBQ cars

 


Re: Photo: WP Boxcar 20807

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Brian and Friends,

AFAIK, besides 19537, the only other experimental cars on the WP were two 40' PS-1s with 6' doors, numbered 1952-1953. These had two versions of Pullman's early cushioned underframe. These were leased by the WP circa 1952 for in-service testing (they don't show in Ed Hawkins' list of PS-1 boxcars, probably because they were built on a Pullman work order to their own account rather than a sales order). They were painted orange with a medium-silver feather to the right of the door (MDC once did this scheme on their rather horrid 40' boxcar). Eventually the WP bought the two cars. One was wrecked, but the other lasted through the 1960s. 

The 1954 cars you mentioned were probably not experiments. These were 40' PS-1s with 8' doors, Compartmentizers and cushioned underframes, numbered 1961-1970. They were painted orange with the huge silver feather, basically a reversal of the silver cars, and apparently had black ends and roofs. In 1959 the cars received DF-2 restrainers, and were repainted into the medium orange feather scheme that that 19501-19542 wore after 1957.

One reason these and the 19501-series were not repeated was that in late 1954 the WP was committed to 50' boxcars. The only other 40' boxcars the WP purchased were AC&F-built 3421-3422, with DF-2 loaders and 8' doors delivered in 1960. These were specifically built for appliance loading out of Galesburg, Illinois.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Fri, Apr 24, 2020 at 10:05 AM Brian Carlson via groups.io <prrk41361=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Shoot. That’s what I get for posting before I’m fully awake. Fred you’re right these just had compartmentizers. I got them confused with the 1954 cars with the cushion under frame. 

Brian J. Carlson 

On Apr 24, 2020, at 9:08 AM, Fred Jansz <fred@...> wrote:

Didn't know this was an experimental car.
As far as I know WP 20801-20820 was a regular 1951 PS-1 order with an experimental WP paint scheme.
Fred Jansz


Re: Photo: WP Boxcar 20807

Fred Jansz
 

Thanks for (super)detailed info Garth.
Fred Jansz


Re: Photo: WP Boxcar 20807

Fred Jansz
 

Thank you for saving my skin Tim.

ASM makes a very nice brass Chrysler truck, which is a steal especially for your wallet.

Now for completeness:

- 1951: WP 20801-20820; all silver, orange feather, slogan
- 1952: renumbered into 19501-19520

- 1951: WP 20821-21400; red w. black ends & roof
- 1952: 22 random cars renumbered into 19521-19542 and repainted; black ends & rood, silver sides w. orange feather & slogan

- May 1953: WP 19537 rebuilt by Pullman and fitted with Timken roller bearing trucks; silver roof & sides, black ends, 'roller freight' logo.

This last car was initiated a couple of years ago by Eric Werner (partly with my info) and built by Intermountain.
However, the car doesn't have the roller bearing trucks, which were supposed to be supplied by Rapido.

My question why Kadee never did the silver WP car with the feather is probably answered by the fact that there were no Chrysler trucks available.

Take care, cheers,
Fred Jansz


Re: Photo: WP Boxcar 20807

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Fred and friends,

I think you are correct. The cars first 20 cars like this were 20801-20820, from series 20801-21400, and were equipped by the factory with Pullman Compartmentizer dividers and Chrysler FR-5 trucks when delivered in 1951. They might have been a test, but were certainly not experimental. The WP was noted for buying small lots of specialty cars, often being among the first in line for innovations that would help them hold onto their customers. Because the railroad skirted the edge of insolvency so often, they didn't have money for a big-ticket splurges (the California Zephyr being a major exception), and the lots of innovative cars were often small.

Within a few months in 1952 the cars were renumbered into their own series 19501-19520. Twenty-two additional cars were drawn at random from the remainder of the original series (20821-21400) and returned to Pullman for conversion to Compartmentizers. These cars, 19521-19542, were then identical to the originals, except they had black ends, since the WP declined the expense of having the existing black car cement removed. Some had black car cement on their roofs, while others did not. AFAIK, these cars kept their ASF A-3 trucks.

The odd-ball in the lot, and certainly an experiment, was 19537, which was equipped with Timken tapered roller bearings. It had an orange Timken herald in the upper right corner. This car was something of a showboat and was exhibited at the California State Fair, probably in 1953, and likely other cities the WP served. This car had black ends, but a silver roof with a black Morton running board. The bearing caps were also silver.

The silver paint became an embarrassment when it began to weather, so around 1957 the WP repainted the whole class with into FCR with a medium-sized orange feather on the right hand side panel and the "Rides like a Feather" slogan in yellow script in the lower right corner. On the left side, Western Pacific in yellow was spelled out in their version of railroad roman. This was a take on their 1955 lettering, which usually had "Feather River Route" in Futura to the right of the doors. The orange feather was also applied to at least two other series of boxcars equipped with various load restraining devices. Champ sold a lot of decals for this paint scheme, but there probably were less than 100 cars in both 40 and 50-foot lengths that carried this lettering.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Fri, Apr 24, 2020 at 9:08 AM Fred Jansz <fred@...> wrote:
Didn't know this was an experimental car.
As far as I know WP 20801-20820 was a regular 1951 PS-1 order with an experimental WP paint scheme.
Fred Jansz


Speaking of rivets

Curt Fortenberry
 


This came across in an email.  Interesting video.  You may have to register to view.  The tool he's using is a grain jewelry tool.

https://finescale.com/videos/how-to-videos/2020/04/skill-building-making-rivets

Curt Fortenberry


Re: B&O P-25D in HO

Eric Hansmann
 

I like the subtle change in shade on the repainted areas for the weight and repack stencils. Very nice!

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jim King
Sent: Friday, April 24, 2020 11:16 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] B&O P-25D in HO

 

I don’t understand your comment re: a “shadow” around the decal edges.  Nothing shows up on my images and except in 1 spot where a little white from an adjoining decal was included when I cut from a sheet.  The posted image, being low rez, might be slightly distorted.  I’ve attached a close up of lettering but also low rez just to be emailable.  I don’t seen any “shadow” around lettering that you asked about.  Maybe I’m missing something?

 

The car was painted Floquil Grimy black with 10% gloss added and the thin-film decals nestled in quickly with diluted Solvaset, then full-strength Solvaset on the 2nd application.  The car was oversprayed with Rustoleum Frosted Clear, when weathering applied in multiple layers on top of that.  No clear coat was applied after dusting simply because the coating obliterates the powders.

 

These cars were used to haul plasterboard (“sheet rock”) and the loads were wrapped in Gold Bond orange and white sheets.  I’m planning to create this load and present it to the B&O Modeler staff as a follow up article.

 

Jim King

http://smokymountainmodelworks.com/

 

8661 - 8680 of 180932