Date   

Re: FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

Nelson Moyer
 

I guess you can’t depend upon the number of stake pockets to estimate the length of a flat car.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Douglas Harding
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2020 6:45 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

 

As cited in my previous message, the WCFN flatcar was 48’6” long, 3’6” longer than the CBQ FM-11.

 

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Nelson Moyer
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2020 1:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

 

Doug provided the history for the WCFN, but if you’re interested in the flat car, it’s very similar to the CB&Q FM-11/11A flat cars built between 1928 and 1930, and they too rode on Andrews trucks. The major difference is length, as the WCFN car is probably 40 ft. or 42 ft. and the CB&Q car was 45 ft. The only visible difference other than length is the FM-11 has 13 stake pockets per side and the WCFN car has 12 stake pockets. The Q cars ran into the 1970s with many converted to TOFC service. A few FM-11As were converted to push plow service by installing a wedge blade on one end and building a box on the deck to hold boulders for ballast. A resin kit is available from Jerry Hamsmith with CB&Q decals. It’s a very well designed kit and relatively easy to build.

 

Nelson Moyer                                                                                           

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Lloyd Keyser
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2020 11:23 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

 

I would like to know more about that flat car. It appears to be on Andrews trucks

Lloyd Keyser

 

On Sat, Apr 18, 2020 at 7:57 AM Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

Sounds like the best way to way to go is to check the business listings in phone books for the year you model in the towns you model and see what you find. Another resource here in Iowa is centennial books – many towns and counties issued them in conjunction with their centennial.  While finding centennial books in public libraries has been easy, finding period phone books has been challenging.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Friday, April 17, 2020 11:41 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

 

On Fri, Apr 17, 2020 at 11:58 AM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

With all this talk of tractor loads, I'm wondering if there were regional followings for either Farmall red or John Deere green. I remember seeing mostly red in Indiana in the 1940 and 1950 on visits to the grandparent's farm. With plants in Moline and Waterloo, would John Deere be more prevalent in Iowa than Farmall?

Jim Ogden touched on this but let me add, it's more granular than that. It didn't really matter where the factory was - the factory could ship nationwide - that's why we see photos of tractors on flatcars. What really mattered is where their distributors were. You're not going to see a flatcar load of green tractors spotted at the team track ramp of a town with only an IH distributorship. That would be red tractor territory. Farmers tended to buy what they could easily get serviced. No sense buying a tractor from a dealer two towns over unless the price was really good. The overlap between territories has of course expanded as highways have gotten better, but that regionallity does still exist. Case in point, when I used to drive US 20 out to Freeport every six weeks or so, I'd pass a New Holland dealer about halfway between Rockford and Freeport. That area is the only place I ever recall seeing New Holland equipment working the fields.

Dennis Storzek

 


Re: F&C LV box car

Rob & Bev Manley
 

Back atcha my brutha.

Rob Manley
"Better modeling through personal embarrassment"


On Friday, April 17, 2020, 01:23:06 PM CDT, Rob & Bev Manley <robev1630@...> wrote:




Rob Manley
"Better modeling through personal embarrassment"


On Tuesday, April 14, 2020, 05:29:23 PM CDT, Clark Propst <cepropst@q.com> wrote:


bill woelfel
2:09pm   #171723  
Car knocker will bad order that car, no couplers!  

The car in not in it's natural habitat. This car had a Duryea underframe. I'm waiting for an order of Kadee 197s. Those are the ones with the narrow boxes because the boxes will stick out a ways passed the ends. I'll have a photo of the car on the layout when the couplers arrive.

Thanks!!
CW Propst


Re: FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

Douglas Harding
 

As cited in my previous message, the WCFN flatcar was 48’6” long, 3’6” longer than the CBQ FM-11.

 

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Nelson Moyer
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2020 1:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

 

Doug provided the history for the WCFN, but if you’re interested in the flat car, it’s very similar to the CB&Q FM-11/11A flat cars built between 1928 and 1930, and they too rode on Andrews trucks. The major difference is length, as the WCFN car is probably 40 ft. or 42 ft. and the CB&Q car was 45 ft. The only visible difference other than length is the FM-11 has 13 stake pockets per side and the WCFN car has 12 stake pockets. The Q cars ran into the 1970s with many converted to TOFC service. A few FM-11As were converted to push plow service by installing a wedge blade on one end and building a box on the deck to hold boulders for ballast. A resin kit is available from Jerry Hamsmith with CB&Q decals. It’s a very well designed kit and relatively easy to build.

 

Nelson Moyer                                                                                           

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Lloyd Keyser
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2020 11:23 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

 

I would like to know more about that flat car. It appears to be on Andrews trucks

Lloyd Keyser

 

On Sat, Apr 18, 2020 at 7:57 AM Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

Sounds like the best way to way to go is to check the business listings in phone books for the year you model in the towns you model and see what you find. Another resource here in Iowa is centennial books – many towns and counties issued them in conjunction with their centennial.  While finding centennial books in public libraries has been easy, finding period phone books has been challenging.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Friday, April 17, 2020 11:41 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] FARMALL TRACTOR DECALS

 

On Fri, Apr 17, 2020 at 11:58 AM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

With all this talk of tractor loads, I'm wondering if there were regional followings for either Farmall red or John Deere green. I remember seeing mostly red in Indiana in the 1940 and 1950 on visits to the grandparent's farm. With plants in Moline and Waterloo, would John Deere be more prevalent in Iowa than Farmall?

Jim Ogden touched on this but let me add, it's more granular than that. It didn't really matter where the factory was - the factory could ship nationwide - that's why we see photos of tractors on flatcars. What really mattered is where their distributors were. You're not going to see a flatcar load of green tractors spotted at the team track ramp of a town with only an IH distributorship. That would be red tractor territory. Farmers tended to buy what they could easily get serviced. No sense buying a tractor from a dealer two towns over unless the price was really good. The overlap between territories has of course expanded as highways have gotten better, but that regionallity does still exist. Case in point, when I used to drive US 20 out to Freeport every six weeks or so, I'd pass a New Holland dealer about halfway between Rockford and Freeport. That area is the only place I ever recall seeing New Holland equipment working the fields.

Dennis Storzek

 


Re: Painting brass

John Sykes III
 

I use a modified Hoxie method.  Clean with lacquer thinner, Spray with Scalecoat I using Xylenes to thin and put in a 200 degree oven, then turn it off.

Here in Florida, one time, I painted the roof of a Rivarossi passenger car black and put it out into the sun to dry.  It partially melted and crazed into a blob.

-- John


Re: Painting brass

Mont Switzer
 

Looks like a good plan B for when I get kicked out of the kitchen.  Mont Switzer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of Joseph [Mstl852@...]
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2020 4:29 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

I now use a plastic tote w a 100 w bulb.  I have to put something to block the direct light to plastic shells as I have melted a Stewart F unit shell.  I put a piece of 2x4 in the tote and put the shell in the shadow and there is no melting, brass is no problem
Joe Binish
New Hope, MN

On Sat, Apr 18, 2020 at 3:26 PM Allen Cain <Allencaintn@...> wrote:
Has anyone tried MicroMark's drying booth?


A bit pricey but so are brass engines.

Allen Cain 


Re: Boiler Load On Flat Car

Guy Wilber
 

Allen wrote:

“Now, can someone suggest materials and methods for tie downs?”

See attached pdf.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


Re: Boiler Load On Flat Car

Nelson Moyer
 

On second thought, here’s my version of the Kewanee boiler load.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Allen Cain
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2020 4:17 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Boiler Load On Flat Car

 

Just got my Birchfield boilers from Multiscale Digital and they look great.

I have attached to photos of three boilers staged on a flatcar to simulate the load shown in the Birchfield Boiler photo that started this thread.  I used two HO and one N scale boiler and I think that they will look great.  And yes, the height of the car with the tallest boiler is within the NMRA standards with a little room to spare.

Now, can someone suggest materials and methods for tie downs?

Thanks,

Allen Cain


Re: Boiler Load On Flat Car

Nelson Moyer
 

Look at Resin Car Works web site at the pictures of the Kewanee boilers on flat cars for inspiration.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Allen Cain
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2020 4:17 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Boiler Load On Flat Car

 

Just got my Birchfield boilers from Multiscale Digital and they look great.

I have attached to photos of three boilers staged on a flatcar to simulate the load shown in the Birchfield Boiler photo that started this thread.  I used two HO and one N scale boiler and I think that they will look great.  And yes, the height of the car with the tallest boiler is within the NMRA standards with a little room to spare.

Now, can someone suggest materials and methods for tie downs?

Thanks,

Allen Cain


Re: Boiler Load On Flat Car

Allen Cain
 

Just got my Birchfield boilers from Multiscale Digital and they look great.

I have attached to photos of three boilers staged on a flatcar to simulate the load shown in the Birchfield Boiler photo that started this thread.  I used two HO and one N scale boiler and I think that they will look great.  And yes, the height of the car with the tallest boiler is within the NMRA standards with a little room to spare.

Now, can someone suggest materials and methods for tie downs?

Thanks,

Allen Cain


Re: B&M XM1 trucks

Dave Parker
 

Having just wrapped up a B&M XM-1, and having three more on the bench, I have a few comments concerning the 71000-series cars:

The best visual match for the 71000-series trucks is indeed the Red Caboose Y-type.  Downsides include the snap-together, "equalized" frame (although I have had some success gluing these to make them rigid), and the absence of brake shoes.  I took a hard look at modifying the bolster to accept Kadee shoes, but threw in the towel.  Game vs. candle and all that.

The Bowser 2F-D8 trucks have a different look, and perhaps are a better match to the PRR trukcs,  As Ben noted, that depends a bit on which photo of the PRR trucks you look at -- thy were not all the same. The Bowser truck has molded-on brake shoes, although I have ground these off and installed Kadees with no difficulty.  If you really squint, you may also notice that the Bowsers lack spring planks, but these can be faked by gluing two small slivers of cardstock or Mylar into the bottom of the spring box.

The Kadee 2D-F8s are, AFAIK, still only available sprung.  No comment.

For the 72000-series cars built in 1930, the best visual match to my eye is the lovely Tahoe MW Buckeye truck.  Very, very close to the prototype's side-frame profile.

Hope this helps.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Painting brass

Joseph
 

I now use a plastic tote w a 100 w bulb.  I have to put something to block the direct light to plastic shells as I have melted a Stewart F unit shell.  I put a piece of 2x4 in the tote and put the shell in the shadow and there is no melting, brass is no problem
Joe Binish
New Hope, MN

On Sat, Apr 18, 2020 at 3:26 PM Allen Cain <Allencaintn@...> wrote:
Has anyone tried MicroMark's drying booth?


A bit pricey but so are brass engines.

Allen Cain 


Re: Painting brass

Allen Cain
 

Has anyone tried MicroMark's drying booth?


A bit pricey but so are brass engines.

Allen Cain 


Re: Painting brass

Mont Switzer
 

Before anyone gets any ideas, a friend once tried the following with his microwave oven:

1. baking paint on a brass model---------almost had what seemed like an electrical fire.  Lesson:  no metal in the micro-wave oven.
2. baking paint on a styrene model------model changed shape while in the oven.  Lesson: styrene can melt in the micro-wave oven.

I suppose we should start reading the boxes on our modes.  Right next to "suitable for children 8 years and older" there should be something like "microwave safe."  If not labeled as such, don't.

So far, everything I've stuck in the dishwasher has turned out OK, but I'm pretty close to being banned from the kitchen.

Mont Switzer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io [schuyler.larrabee@...]
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2020 4:05 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

Guys.. .

 

Go to the grocery store (well masked these days) and buy yourself an oven thermometer.  Short money (I’ve had mine for a long time) for some sense of security that you really know what the temperature is in the oven.

 

I was given a tabletop convection oven a very long time ago, accurate and dedicated to baking models . . . but last I turned it on, it didn’t respond at all, so I have been messing about with my kitchen oven. The “warm” setting settles in at 200 degrees, a bit high for my comfort. The lowest setting it will accept is 170. That would be OK, but it overruns that to ~220, and then cools down.  I think I am going to adopt Brian’s procedure.

 

A friend has set up a “booth” that has a couple of 100W lamps at the bottom of a shallow wooden box, fairly small (enough to suspend an articulated locomotive’s boiler) which he turns on when he begins painting, and then suspends the model in the box, and turns off the lights. Seems to work well to bake Scalecoat 1.  I may follow suit.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of BRIAN PAUL EHNI
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2020 3:52 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

 

In my case, I have to set the oven to 170ºF, because it won’t go any lower. So when it hits 150ºF, I’d put the model in and turn it off.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Mont Switzer <MSwitzer@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, April 18, 2020 at 2:39 PM
To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

 

Many years ago I learned a hard lesson about baking brass models.  In conjunction with that lesson I also got to learn how to re-assemble some brass models.  After that I still used Mrs. Switzer's oven, but I went about it differently.  I now use the following steps:

 

1. preheat the oven to 150 degrees (I'm not disagreeing with 185 degrees)

2. when the light indicates the oven is at 150 degrees (pre-heat completed) turn it off

3. insert models

4. allow oven to cool and remove models 

 

The bad experience I had may have been a defect in the oven, but I'm not going to find out a second time.  I had placed the models in the oven and set it to pre-heat to 150 degrees.  It appears that during the pre-heating process the oven went well above 150 to bring the oven to the desired temperature.  That temperature was high enough to melt solder.

 

Mont Switzer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of bob.stetser@... [bob.stetser@...]
Sent: Saturday, April 11, 2020 7:29 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

Soak in lacquer thinner for a couple of hours to remove whatever is on the model.

Run twice in the ultrasonic cleaner, let dry

Spray, from rattle can, Rust-Oleum Primer, SELF ETCHING PRIMER, let dry

Spray with airbrush color of choice.

Bake 1 hour in oven at 185 degrees, leave in oven until cool.

Attachments:


Re: Painting brass

Joseph
 

That happened to a buddy of mine.  He was baking a passenger car, went downstairs to work on something else.  His wife came home to make cookies and raised the oven temp.  The car was later sent to a friend to have it re assembled.  His house burned down. 

I have melted a Walthers H10-44 shell while trying to set Scalecoat.   My kids learned all kinds of new words that day. 
I keep that shell around so if I start to get cocky it brings me back to reality. 

Joe Binish
New Hope , MN



On Sat, Apr 18, 2020 at 2:57 PM John Larkin via groups.io <jflarkingrc=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Mont,

Did you consider the model to be "well-done" after the first baking?   (Groan!)

John Larkin



On Saturday, April 18, 2020, 2:52:12 PM CDT, BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@...> wrote:


In my case, I have to set the oven to 170ºF, because it won’t go any lower. So when it hits 150ºF, I’d put the model in and turn it off.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Mont Switzer <MSwitzer@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, April 18, 2020 at 2:39 PM
To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

 

Many years ago I learned a hard lesson about baking brass models.  In conjunction with that lesson I also got to learn how to re-assemble some brass models.  After that I still used Mrs. Switzer's oven, but I went about it differently.  I now use the following steps:

 

1. preheat the oven to 150 degrees (I'm not disagreeing with 185 degrees)

2. when the light indicates the oven is at 150 degrees (pre-heat completed) turn it off

3. insert models

4. allow oven to cool and remove models 

 

The bad experience I had may have been a defect in the oven, but I'm not going to find out a second time.  I had placed the models in the oven and set it to pre-heat to 150 degrees.  It appears that during the pre-heating process the oven went well above 150 to bring the oven to the desired temperature.  That temperature was high enough to melt solder.

 

Mont Switzer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of bob.stetser@... [bob.stetser@...]
Sent: Saturday, April 11, 2020 7:29 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

Soak in lacquer thinner for a couple of hours to remove whatever is on the model.

Run twice in the ultrasonic cleaner, let dry

Spray, from rattle can, Rust-Oleum Primer, SELF ETCHING PRIMER, let dry

Spray with airbrush color of choice.

Bake 1 hour in oven at 185 degrees, leave in oven until cool.


Re: Barriger Library AC&F Photos

Bruce Smith
 

David,

As usual, very interesting! 

Just a few photos up from SHPX 17520 is this Carnegie Steel Slab Cooling Car, lettered for the War Department Ordnance:

SHPX 1750 is a "classic" USG-A that could be modeled from a Tichy tank and IM type 27 under frame.

USQX 11200 shows have the USG-A cars  for USQX had a GATC-style frame (built by AC&F) and an AC&F tank.

NdeM 4305 presents an interesting issue. It too is a "classic" USG-A, except that it has a horizontal shaft hand brake. When I looked at the photo I wondered why we (the USA) were building cars for Mexico, when we were desperately short ourselves. In a post in 2008, ( #72832) Richard Hendrickson indicates that the War Production Board apparently had the same question and at least some of the NdeM cars were redirected to SHPX. This may in fact be one of those cars, and it would actually not have left Milton in this paint....

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of David via groups.io <jaydeet2001@...>
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2020 8:01 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Barriger Library AC&F Photos
 
After taking a break for a year or so, some early-1940s AC&F builder's
photos have been added to the Flickr page, including several USG-A
4-course tanks.

SHPX 17520:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/49619124151/in/album-72157649155982802/

USQX 11200 :
https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/49619388297/in/album-72157649155982802/

NdeM 45305:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/49618608328/in/album-72157649155982802/

David Thompson




Re: Painting brass

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Guys.. .

 

Go to the grocery store (well masked these days) and buy yourself an oven thermometer.  Short money (I’ve had mine for a long time) for some sense of security that you really know what the temperature is in the oven.

 

I was given a tabletop convection oven a very long time ago, accurate and dedicated to baking models . . . but last I turned it on, it didn’t respond at all, so I have been messing about with my kitchen oven. The “warm” setting settles in at 200 degrees, a bit high for my comfort. The lowest setting it will accept is 170. That would be OK, but it overruns that to ~220, and then cools down.  I think I am going to adopt Brian’s procedure.

 

A friend has set up a “booth” that has a couple of 100W lamps at the bottom of a shallow wooden box, fairly small (enough to suspend an articulated locomotive’s boiler) which he turns on when he begins painting, and then suspends the model in the box, and turns off the lights. Seems to work well to bake Scalecoat 1.  I may follow suit.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of BRIAN PAUL EHNI
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2020 3:52 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

 

In my case, I have to set the oven to 170ºF, because it won’t go any lower. So when it hits 150ºF, I’d put the model in and turn it off.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Mont Switzer <MSwitzer@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, April 18, 2020 at 2:39 PM
To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

 

Many years ago I learned a hard lesson about baking brass models.  In conjunction with that lesson I also got to learn how to re-assemble some brass models.  After that I still used Mrs. Switzer's oven, but I went about it differently.  I now use the following steps:

 

1. preheat the oven to 150 degrees (I'm not disagreeing with 185 degrees)

2. when the light indicates the oven is at 150 degrees (pre-heat completed) turn it off

3. insert models

4. allow oven to cool and remove models 

 

The bad experience I had may have been a defect in the oven, but I'm not going to find out a second time.  I had placed the models in the oven and set it to pre-heat to 150 degrees.  It appears that during the pre-heating process the oven went well above 150 to bring the oven to the desired temperature.  That temperature was high enough to melt solder.

 

Mont Switzer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of bob.stetser@... [bob.stetser@...]
Sent: Saturday, April 11, 2020 7:29 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

Soak in lacquer thinner for a couple of hours to remove whatever is on the model.

Run twice in the ultrasonic cleaner, let dry

Spray, from rattle can, Rust-Oleum Primer, SELF ETCHING PRIMER, let dry

Spray with airbrush color of choice.

Bake 1 hour in oven at 185 degrees, leave in oven until cool.


Re: Painting brass

Mont Switzer
 

John,

Oh yeah, it was well-done alright.  

It was wondering what that sound was coming from the kitchen, the tink, tink, tink, which turned out to be turned brass air tanks from several Alco C-420 frames hitting the cookie sheet.

I can laugh about it now.

Mont Switzer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of John Larkin via groups.io [jflarkingrc@...]
Sent: Saturday, April 18, 2020 3:56 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

Mont,

Did you consider the model to be "well-done" after the first baking?   (Groan!)

John Larkin



On Saturday, April 18, 2020, 2:52:12 PM CDT, BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@...> wrote:


In my case, I have to set the oven to 170ºF, because it won’t go any lower. So when it hits 150ºF, I’d put the model in and turn it off.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Mont Switzer <MSwitzer@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, April 18, 2020 at 2:39 PM
To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

 

Many years ago I learned a hard lesson about baking brass models.  In conjunction with that lesson I also got to learn how to re-assemble some brass models.  After that I still used Mrs. Switzer's oven, but I went about it differently.  I now use the following steps:

 

1. preheat the oven to 150 degrees (I'm not disagreeing with 185 degrees)

2. when the light indicates the oven is at 150 degrees (pre-heat completed) turn it off

3. insert models

4. allow oven to cool and remove models 

 

The bad experience I had may have been a defect in the oven, but I'm not going to find out a second time.  I had placed the models in the oven and set it to pre-heat to 150 degrees.  It appears that during the pre-heating process the oven went well above 150 to bring the oven to the desired temperature.  That temperature was high enough to melt solder.

 

Mont Switzer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of bob.stetser@... [bob.stetser@...]
Sent: Saturday, April 11, 2020 7:29 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

Soak in lacquer thinner for a couple of hours to remove whatever is on the model.

Run twice in the ultrasonic cleaner, let dry

Spray, from rattle can, Rust-Oleum Primer, SELF ETCHING PRIMER, let dry

Spray with airbrush color of choice.

Bake 1 hour in oven at 185 degrees, leave in oven until cool.


Re: Painting brass

John Larkin
 

Mont,

Did you consider the model to be "well-done" after the first baking?   (Groan!)

John Larkin



On Saturday, April 18, 2020, 2:52:12 PM CDT, BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@...> wrote:


In my case, I have to set the oven to 170ºF, because it won’t go any lower. So when it hits 150ºF, I’d put the model in and turn it off.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Mont Switzer <MSwitzer@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, April 18, 2020 at 2:39 PM
To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

 

Many years ago I learned a hard lesson about baking brass models.  In conjunction with that lesson I also got to learn how to re-assemble some brass models.  After that I still used Mrs. Switzer's oven, but I went about it differently.  I now use the following steps:

 

1. preheat the oven to 150 degrees (I'm not disagreeing with 185 degrees)

2. when the light indicates the oven is at 150 degrees (pre-heat completed) turn it off

3. insert models

4. allow oven to cool and remove models 

 

The bad experience I had may have been a defect in the oven, but I'm not going to find out a second time.  I had placed the models in the oven and set it to pre-heat to 150 degrees.  It appears that during the pre-heating process the oven went well above 150 to bring the oven to the desired temperature.  That temperature was high enough to melt solder.

 

Mont Switzer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of bob.stetser@... [bob.stetser@...]
Sent: Saturday, April 11, 2020 7:29 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

Soak in lacquer thinner for a couple of hours to remove whatever is on the model.

Run twice in the ultrasonic cleaner, let dry

Spray, from rattle can, Rust-Oleum Primer, SELF ETCHING PRIMER, let dry

Spray with airbrush color of choice.

Bake 1 hour in oven at 185 degrees, leave in oven until cool.


Re: Painting brass

BRIAN PAUL EHNI
 

In my case, I have to set the oven to 170ºF, because it won’t go any lower. So when it hits 150ºF, I’d put the model in and turn it off.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Mont Switzer <MSwitzer@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, April 18, 2020 at 2:39 PM
To: "main@RealSTMFC.groups.io" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

 

Many years ago I learned a hard lesson about baking brass models.  In conjunction with that lesson I also got to learn how to re-assemble some brass models.  After that I still used Mrs. Switzer's oven, but I went about it differently.  I now use the following steps:

 

1. preheat the oven to 150 degrees (I'm not disagreeing with 185 degrees)

2. when the light indicates the oven is at 150 degrees (pre-heat completed) turn it off

3. insert models

4. allow oven to cool and remove models 

 

The bad experience I had may have been a defect in the oven, but I'm not going to find out a second time.  I had placed the models in the oven and set it to pre-heat to 150 degrees.  It appears that during the pre-heating process the oven went well above 150 to bring the oven to the desired temperature.  That temperature was high enough to melt solder.

 

Mont Switzer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of bob.stetser@... [bob.stetser@...]
Sent: Saturday, April 11, 2020 7:29 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

Soak in lacquer thinner for a couple of hours to remove whatever is on the model.

Run twice in the ultrasonic cleaner, let dry

Spray, from rattle can, Rust-Oleum Primer, SELF ETCHING PRIMER, let dry

Spray with airbrush color of choice.

Bake 1 hour in oven at 185 degrees, leave in oven until cool.


Re: Painting brass

Mont Switzer
 

Many years ago I learned a hard lesson about baking brass models.  In conjunction with that lesson I also got to learn how to re-assemble some brass models.  After that I still used Mrs. Switzer's oven, but I went about it differently.  I now use the following steps:

1. preheat the oven to 150 degrees (I'm not disagreeing with 185 degrees)
2. when the light indicates the oven is at 150 degrees (pre-heat completed) turn it off
3. insert models
4. allow oven to cool and remove models 

The bad experience I had may have been a defect in the oven, but I'm not going to find out a second time.  I had placed the models in the oven and set it to pre-heat to 150 degrees.  It appears that during the pre-heating process the oven went well above 150 to bring the oven to the desired temperature.  That temperature was high enough to melt solder.

Mont Switzer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of bob.stetser@... [bob.stetser@...]
Sent: Saturday, April 11, 2020 7:29 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Painting brass

Soak in lacquer thinner for a couple of hours to remove whatever is on the model.

Run twice in the ultrasonic cleaner, let dry

Spray, from rattle can, Rust-Oleum Primer, SELF ETCHING PRIMER, let dry

Spray with airbrush color of choice.

Bake 1 hour in oven at 185 degrees, leave in oven until cool.

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