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D&RGW coal train, which cars appropriate?

vapeurchapelon
 

Hello friends,

please allow another dumb question from a freight car newbie. Part of my "mixed freight" is a cut of D&RGW drop bottom coal gondolas, up to date 13 of the 47' type offered by W&R several years ago. I am assuming that just this one car type would be very unlikely to see and therefore I am looking for other cars to add variety. But I don't know enough to decide which available cars can be credibly painted D&RGW. I recall a posting on this group several months ago that most or all D&RGW's gondolas were special in several details and proportions.

The following drop bottom type gondolas are available (in brass, which is mandatory for me for this train):

USRA composite side drop bottom:
https://www.brasstrains.com/BrassGuide/PDG/Detail/19532

GS composite side:
https://www.brasstrains.com/BrassGuide/PDG/Detail/43214

UP G 50-7:
https://www.brasstrains.com/BrassGuide/Pdg/Detail/19484/HO-Rolling-Stock-Challenger-Imports-LTD-2250-1-Union-Pacific-GONDOLA

https://www.brasstrains.com/BrassGuide/Pdg/Detail/19485/HO-Rolling-Stock-Challenger-Imports-LTD-2251-1-Union-Pacific-GONDOLA

SP G 50-9:
https://www.brasstrains.com/BrassGuide/Pdg/Detail/19360/HO-Rolling-Stock-Challenger-Imports-LTD-2096-1-Southern-Pacific-GONDOLA

SP G 50-12:
https://www.brasstrains.com/BrassGuide/Pdg/Detail/19366/HO-Rolling-Stock-Challenger-Imports-LTD-2249-1-Southern-Pacific-GONDOLA

Is there any model in this list which I can use to make a D&RGW car? And what would be the major changes to do?
Yes I did try to search information, but did not find anything definite. Red Caboose once offered both a wood side GS and a steel side GS gondola lettered D&RGW - but I just don't know if these were correct considering the fact that most all manufacturers were/ are offering "foobies".

I found this photo:
http://www.railgoat.railfan.net/other_cars/drgw_cars/drgw_number/072000-073699.htm

Described here as a 46' type, but if you use "Back to D&RGW Freight Cars Page" you will find it listed as a 40' car (scroll down to the end of the list) - what is correct? To me it looks very similar (please excuse me) to the UP or SP models offered by Challenger.

I would appreciate any kind of help.

Many greetings

Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1953

Re: Erie's New York City Piers

Benjamin Hom
 

Bob Chaparro asked:
"Were the Erie's piers located in Brooklyn, Manhattan or both?
What were the pier numbers?"

Manhattan - West 23rd St; later West 28th St, Piers 67 & 68.

Bronx - Harlem Station.


Ben Hom

Erie's New York City Piers

Bob Chaparro
 

Were the Erie's piers located in Brooklyn, Manhattan or both?

What were the pier numbers?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Segmented Wood Running Boards

Tony Thompson
 

This sounds like the conventional three-board arrangement.
Tony Thompson 


On Feb 8, 2019, at 3:27 PM, Jack Mullen <jack.f.mullen@...> wrote:

Not quite the same thing, but in the '20s and '30s, Milwaukee seems to have placed the board joints opposite each other rather than the normal staggered pattern.  The individual boards were longer than the NYC examples, so the running boards divided into 3 or 4 segments.

Jack Mullen

Re: Throwback Thursday: MDC "Old Timer" Freight Cars II

Chuck Soule
 

Regarding the MDC diner in the ad, I have not done a comparison to drawings, but it appears to be very close the the Northern Pacific diner from the initial North Coast Limited in 1900.  In comparing the model to photos in Some Classic Trains,  the only difference appears to be placement of a small window in the galley area.  The other windows all appear to match the NP diner.

Chuck Soule

Re: Segmented Wood Running Boards

Jack Mullen
 

Not quite the same thing, but in the '20s and '30s, Milwaukee seems to have placed the board joints opposite each other rather than the normal staggered pattern.  The individual boards were longer than the NYC examples, so the running boards divided into 3 or 4 segments.

Jack Mullen

Re: Soo Line Wood Boxcars #100-444 / Accurail 7000 Series Kitbash #100-444

Sean Murphy
 

Dennis,
Thanks for the recommendation although Ken Soroos' email didn't come through.

Lester,
I just started following your blog and I really like your techniques for turning cheap cars into excellent models, The resin car looks great! I look forward to your post on it!

Why no major manufacturer has produced this signature car is beyond me. The resin cars are too expensive and rare and I would bet that there is a demand for them. Being a GN modeler, I am spoiled for choice when it comes to prototypical cars available. Modeling smaller midwest roads is certainly not easy.

Re: Segmented Wood Running Boards

Daniel McConnachie
 

Canadian National did this as well on quite a few of their 40' steel boxcars. 

Cheers, Daniel.

On Fri, Feb 8, 2019 at 12:37 PM Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

I've seen a number of wood running boards over the years, although maybe not as many as others in this group have seen. In the photo on the link below I noticed the wood running boards appear to be fabricated from short segments of boards. I can't recall seeing this before:

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/nyc-elywrk-frc.jpg

Is this an anomaly?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



--
Daniel McConnachie

Re: Boxcar upgrades

Ken Adams
 

For those of you with a more western modeling bent, The Accurail 1400 series with metal ends and straight center sills have some resemblance to D&RGW 36 foot boxcars. There was an article in the 2017 4Q D&RGW Prospector on modifying these to a fairly accurate model of the D&RGW 634xx series cars. I bought a Rio Grande 3 pack before I located undercorated versions for my bash into an US Navy Port Chicago ammo transfer boxcar. See my blog at https://srandsp.blogspot.com/2018/12/us-navy-box-car-from-port-chicago.html.
 
 I haven't touched this trio and they remain in my one day I will build them pile. They don't fit my current early 1950's  modeling plans though. Andrew Dahm at Westerfield has indicated some interest in doing an accurate resin kit. But I followed the advice given  to Dustin Hofimann in the movie "The Graduate" and am into plastic.

The nice thing about these cars is there are two existing prototype examples at the Western Railway Museum near Rio Vista, California. Both were ex US Navy cars. 

Re: Boxcar upgrades

Donald B. Valentine
 

A well worthwhile piece to read for NYC and Lackawanna fans in particular, not to mention us Rutland fanatics.

Thanks Eric & Dave

Re: Segmented Wood Running Boards

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Did the NYC use these segmented running boards on their USRA steel boxcars?

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: "Paul Doggett via Groups.Io" <paul.doggett2472@...>
Date: 2/8/19 9:04 AM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Segmented Wood Running Boards

A great photo for weathering roofs.

Paul Doggett England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 8 Feb 2019, at 18:39, lrkdbn via Groups.Io <lrkdbn@...> wrote:

I do know the NYC used these on at least several lots of box cars-both before and during WWII
Also the ART reefer line used them in the late 20's on at least some cars.
I have seen a MDT reefer drawing from 1916 in which the longitudinal running board was made up of short
boards like the lateral RB in your picture running crosswise of the car and held by a metal edge on each side.
(if you can visualize the lateral RB extended to 40 ft long)
Larry King

Re: Segmented Wood Running Boards

Paul Doggett
 

A great photo for weathering roofs.

Paul Doggett England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 8 Feb 2019, at 18:39, lrkdbn via Groups.Io <lrkdbn@...> wrote:

I do know the NYC used these on at least several lots of box cars-both before and during WWII
Also the ART reefer line used them in the late 20's on at least some cars.
I have seen a MDT reefer drawing from 1916 in which the longitudinal running board was made up of short
boards like the lateral RB in your picture running crosswise of the car and held by a metal edge on each side.
(if you can visualize the lateral RB extended to 40 ft long)
Larry King

Re: Segmented Wood Running Boards

lrkdbn
 

I do know the NYC used these on at least several lots of box cars-both before and during WWII
Also the ART reefer line used them in the late 20's on at least some cars.
I have seen a MDT reefer drawing from 1916 in which the longitudinal running board was made up of short
boards like the lateral RB in your picture running crosswise of the car and held by a metal edge on each side.
(if you can visualize the lateral RB extended to 40 ft long)
Larry King

Re: Segmented Wood Running Boards

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

I've seen a number of wood running boards over the years, although maybe not as many as others in this group have seen. In the photo on the link below I noticed the wood running boards appear to be fabricated from short segments of boards. I can't recall seeing this before:
Is this an anomaly?

   Certainly not an anomaly, but far from typical.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Segmented Wood Running Boards

Bruce Smith
 

As I learned at Cocoa Beach, this is apparently a NYC standard application!

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Feb 8, 2019, at 11:37 AM, Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

I've seen a number of wood running boards over the years, although maybe not as many as others in this group have seen. In the photo on the link below I noticed the wood running boards appear to be fabricated from short segments of boards. I can't recall seeing this before:
Is this an anomaly?
Thanks.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

Segmented Wood Running Boards

Bob Chaparro
 

I've seen a number of wood running boards over the years, although maybe not as many as others in this group have seen. In the photo on the link below I noticed the wood running boards appear to be fabricated from short segments of boards. I can't recall seeing this before:

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/nyc-elywrk-frc.jpg

Is this an anomaly?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Boxcar upgrades

Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, Feb 8, 2019 at 04:10 AM, Eric Hansmann wrote:

Dave Parker shares detail techniques to upgrade Accurail shorties in the latest DesignBuildOp blog post. A little effort creates a few distinctive boxcars.

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2019/02/08/upgrading-accurail-shorties/

Very nice article, Eric and Dave. Dave mentions the lack of upper corner brackets on the steel ended cars:

"One solution might be the gussets or reinforcing straps at the car corners. These should be quite different on the metal-end cars but, due to production constraints, they are not, and they follow the wood-end prototype. I thought about modifying these, but the proximity to the molded-on grabs gave me pause."

This is a perpetual problem with trying to design mix 'n match sides and ends, there is always something that goes around the corner on one version but not the others. The problem Dave mentions is on the NYC and NKP prototypes the top grab iron lands on this plate, complicating adding it to the model.

These would be a natural for someone to offer as etchings; .010 stock could yield .004" scale thickness straps with scale size rivets and nuts on the surface. In addition, the right hand plates could have a cutout for the molded on grab included in their profile. I've mentioned this before, but thus far, no takers. I'll make the offer again; if someone wants to offer these as parts, I'll sipply the drawing of that part of the tool cavity which would make designing the cutout east.

Dennis Storzek

Re: Military loads - "Roco" depressed center flat for foriegn service - photo

Carl Marsico
 

Does anyone know of any "domestic" prototypes that can be built using the Roco model as a starting point?

Re: First Shipment Of California Vegetables To Boston?

Richard Bale
 

Don...
John Signor prepared a map showing the location of Santa Fe icing stations between the west coast and Chicago. The map appears on page 166 of John White's The Great Yellow Fleet. 
Richard Bale

In a message dated 2/7/2019 3:50:53 PM Pacific Standard Time, tony@... writes:

Don Valentine  wrote:

Thank you Tony & Mark. Given what you have both provided where were the earliest re-icing stations located and how close in proximity to one another were they given the average distance traveled by most trains, either passenger or freight, in those days?
    Sorry, that's not something I have researched for that early period. By the 1890s, Armour had created a network of icing stations, but before that, I don't know.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history



Re: First Shipment Of California Vegetables To Boston?

Dennis Storzek
 

On Thu, Feb 7, 2019 at 08:47 PM, Fred Swanson wrote:
Perhaps coming into Boston since New York is a couple mile short of cross country:)  D'Arrigo still has a large presence in the Salinas Valley. I looked up one of their companies (Andyboy) for their history and found a Wikipedia.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%27Arrigo_Brothers  It says nothing about being the first vegetable shipment. 
But it does say they were the first the first to ship fresh fruits and vegetables from California to the east coast YEAR ROUND, which may say more about their ability to manage their farming operation than anything it says about railroad technology. I can see how a unsophisticated writer could pick up on the "first."

Dennis Storzek