Date   

Re: Instructions and PDS-Sunshine URTX 1948-49 Reefer

Nelson Moyer
 

Sorry, but I don’t have that one.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of nyc3001 .
Sent: Friday, August 21, 2020 2:04 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Instructions and PDS-Sunshine URTX 1948-49 Reefer

 

This is kit 46.13.


Re: Instructions and PDS-Sunshine URTX 1948-49 Reefer

nyc3001 .
 

This is kit 46.13.


Re: Covered Hopper Help

Richard Townsend
 

I believe it is IC 79000. According to my 1/43 ORER, which is the closest to the date of the photo, the IC did not have any car numbered 9000. But it did have 14 all steel covered hoppers in the series 79000-79031. 31'11" length, 50-ton capacity.

I also checked for an ACY 9000 but no joy.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Matt Smith <flyn96@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Aug 21, 2020 11:11 am
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Covered Hopper Help

Trying to identify this covered hopper in the wreck. Lettering looks like IC and it's a wreck on the IC in Farmer City IL 1944. It looks like IC 9000 but there is also a Y next to the IC. Also looks to be a converted conventional 2 bay hopper. Thoughts?

You can download the high resolution photo in the drop down next to the print icon.
http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll62/id/45330/rec/108
--

Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL


Re: Instructions and PDS-Sunshine URTX 1948-49 Reefer

gary laakso
 

What kit number is it?

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of nyc3001 .
Sent: Friday, August 21, 2020 11:06 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Instructions and PDS-Sunshine URTX 1948-49 Reefer

 

Hi guys,

I just got a Sunshine URTX 1948-1949 reefer kit, but it has no instructions or PDS. Does anyone have the documents for this kit?

Thanks,
Phil


Re: Photo: Railroad Yards In West Bottoms (Undated)

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
 

Bob,

We can begin to put a date on this photo by the Seaboard round-roof double-door boxcar. Series 1100-11999 (class AF-1) was delivered in 1940. Series 22000-22199 (class AF-2) were delivered in 1942. I'm not a Seaboard maven, and with a photo this small can't see the numbers to decide which class (I saved it to my desktop and blew it up with Photoshop; still not readable). Thus 1940 is our baseline.

I can't spot anything else that might be newer. The first Milwaukee Road rib-side cars were introduced in 1939 according to my resources. Maybe there is a clue in the GN goat herald, the M&STL single-sheathed boxcar with the slanted "Peoria Gateway" on its doors, or the ACL car with the very plain circular herald.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


On Fri, Aug 21, 2020 at 1:04 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: Railroad Yards In West Bottoms (Undated)

A fair quality photo from the Kansas City Public Library:

https://kchistory.org/islandora/object/kchistory%3A104507/datastream/OBJ/view

Click on the photo to enlarge it.

Quite a variety of freight cars.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: PRR Gondola 296954 With Export Log Load (Circa 1930s)

Bruce Smith
 

Interesting is right!  I missed that looking at the arrangement for unloading and loading, with the metal “spars” to the left and the ship’s hosts to the right. I wonder where these logs were headed?

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

On Aug 21, 2020, at 12:46 PM, mel perry <clipper841@...> wrote:

interesting track arrangment
mel perry

On Fri, Aug 21, 2020, 10:08 AM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
Photo: PRR Gondola 296954 With Export Log Load (Circa 1930s)
A photo from the Artstor website:
Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.
Taken at Wilmington, Delaware.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA




Re: Instructions and PDS-Sunshine URTX 1948-49 Reefer

nyc3001 .
 

Ah; my bad. 46.13 is the kit number.


Re: Instructions and PDS-Sunshine URTX 1948-49 Reefer

Nelson Moyer
 

The kit number would help.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of nyc3001 .
Sent: Friday, August 21, 2020 1:06 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Instructions and PDS-Sunshine URTX 1948-49 Reefer

 

Hi guys,

I just got a Sunshine URTX 1948-1949 reefer kit, but it has no instructions or PDS. Does anyone have the documents for this kit?

Thanks,
Phil


Covered Hopper Help

Matt Smith
 

Trying to identify this covered hopper in the wreck. Lettering looks like IC and it's a wreck on the IC in Farmer City IL 1944. It looks like IC 9000 but there is also a Y next to the IC. Also looks to be a converted conventional 2 bay hopper. Thoughts?

You can download the high resolution photo in the drop down next to the print icon.
http://www.idaillinois.org/digital/collection/p16614coll62/id/45330/rec/108
--

Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL


Instructions and PDS-Sunshine URTX 1948-49 Reefer

nyc3001 .
 

Hi guys,

I just got a Sunshine URTX 1948-1949 reefer kit, but it has no instructions or PDS. Does anyone have the documents for this kit?

Thanks,
Phil


Re: Photo: Railroad Yards In West Bottoms (Undated)

Bill Keene
 

The West Bottoms was a very busy place. 

From the far distance coming forward there are the freight houses and yards of the following railroads:
CRI&P
MKT
MILW
ATSF
CB&Q
C&A — later GM&O
SLSF. 

Not viewable behind the large building in the left distance is a UP yard — State Line Yard. Also, just off the photo to the right is a KCT yard, a Wabash yard, and a KCS yard. 

The Kansas City Terminal Railway (KCT) also had trackage amongst these railroads in the photo. 

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On Aug 21, 2020, at 10:04 AM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: Railroad Yards In West Bottoms (Undated)
A fair quality photo from the Kansas City Public Library:
Click on the photo to enlarge it.
Quite a variety of freight cars.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: PRR Gondola 296954 With Export Log Load (Circa 1930s)

mel perry
 

interesting track arrangment
mel perry

On Fri, Aug 21, 2020, 10:08 AM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Photo: PRR Gondola 296954 With Export Log Load (Circa 1930s)

A photo from the Artstor website:

https://library.artstor.org/#/asset/SS7729601_7729601_641419;prevRouteTS=1597971625034

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Taken at Wilmington, Delaware.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: WAB Postwar AAR DD Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #4

Robert kirkham
 

Really nice model!  Am very curious to hear what paint/ colour you used for the faded boxcar red?

Rob

On Aug 21, 2020, at 10:12 AM, Robert Chapman <chapbob4014@...> wrote:

Wabash #8188 is a member of the 300-car DD boxcars series #8000-8299 of 1950. The carbodies featured 12-foot door openings, R-3-4 early improved dreadnaught ends, riveted panels, and a diagonal panel roof. Front Range’s circa-1990 kit #4090 nearly matches this prototype, exceptions being a 13-foot door opening and the later-style improved dreadnaught ends.  

The door opening was narrowed to 12 feet with styrene spacers, and the deep-fishbelly sidesill narrowed to more typical depth, bolster to bolster. Contemporary detail adds include Apex runningboard, Kadee 7/7 ladders and Miner brakewheel, and Tahoe Barber S-2 trucks. Decals are K4.

Thanks to Chet French for his technical help. Fun fact – according to Chet (and confirmed on the WAB lettering diagram), WAB added an extra 3” between the first and second numeral of a 4-digit car number; if five digits, the space moved between the second and third numerals.   

Regards,
Bob Chapman

<WAB Ptd.JPG><WAB DD Unptd.JPG>


WAB Postwar AAR DD Boxcar – Front Range Upgrade #4

Bob Chapman
 

Wabash #8188 is a member of the 300-car DD boxcars series #8000-8299 of 1950. The carbodies featured 12-foot door openings, R-3-4 early improved dreadnaught ends, riveted panels, and a diagonal panel roof. Front Range’s circa-1990 kit #4090 nearly matches this prototype, exceptions being a 13-foot door opening and the later-style improved dreadnaught ends.  

The door opening was narrowed to 12 feet with styrene spacers, and the deep-fishbelly sidesill narrowed to more typical depth, bolster to bolster. Contemporary detail adds include Apex runningboard, Kadee 7/7 ladders and Miner brakewheel, and Tahoe Barber S-2 trucks. Decals are K4.

Thanks to Chet French for his technical help. Fun fact – according to Chet (and confirmed on the WAB lettering diagram), WAB added an extra 3” between the first and second numeral of a 4-digit car number; if five digits, the space moved between the second and third numerals.   

Regards,
Bob Chapman


Photo: PRR Gondola 296954 With Export Log Load (Circa 1930s)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: PRR Gondola 296954 With Export Log Load (Circa 1930s)

A photo from the Artstor website:

https://library.artstor.org/#/asset/SS7729601_7729601_641419;prevRouteTS=1597971625034

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Taken at Wilmington, Delaware.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Railroad Yards In West Bottoms (Undated)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Railroad Yards In West Bottoms (Undated)

A fair quality photo from the Kansas City Public Library:

https://kchistory.org/islandora/object/kchistory%3A104507/datastream/OBJ/view

Click on the photo to enlarge it.

Quite a variety of freight cars.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Ship anchors?

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Aug 21, 2020, at 08:16, Edward <edb8381@gmail.com> wrote:

[...]

Anchors for a flatcar load would be more like those used on large naval vessels and ocean going ships since the late 19th century, having two large flukes attached to a shank with an eyelet for attaching the anchor chain. At about 10 tons or so each, four such anchors would make a good flat car load, held in place with wood blocking. The attached photo will show the scale of these anchors, from a person sitting by it.
[alert: era-dependencies at work]

There were (and in a few cases still are preserved) sailing ships built in the late 19th century and even a few steam axiliaries built in the early 20th which carried the sliding stock anchors. Balclutha, 1886, Connell & Sons, Glagsgow (one of the first 20 or so steel-hulled sailing ships[0]) is currently resident at the only floating national park in the US and its territories[1]. The more modern naval anchor doesn't cat up like the earlier design, so even the early steam auxiliaries with the more traditional hull shape carried the earlier design of anchor.
--
Nolan Hinshaw, docent emeritus, footnote [1]

[0] for non-military use, steam was for high-priority cargoes, like people and mail - vide the Pacific Mail Steamship company. For the lower-priority cargo, sail was still for a long time less expensive to operate than was steam, especially for bulk haulers.

[1] San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park: <https://www.nps.gov/safr/index.htm>


Re: Ship anchors?

Robert kirkham
 

Not an area I am expert on, but have spent a fair amount of time looking at models of anchors.   For ship building, I would think most anchors were made near the shipyard, moved aboard the ship and spent their life at sea.  So if you model trackage from the anchor maker to the shipyard, OK I guess.  But I imagine most makers were at water’s edge and movement was direct from the site to the ship, or by barge from the site to the shipyard.  

For an anchor of that design, you’re looking at quite the anomaly at that size.  I think it is a larger scale model.  If it was smaller, then I could see such an anchor as part of merchandise shipped from here to there for smaller vessels.  https://cdn2.hubspot.net/hubfs/3274142/STEVSHARK/Vryhof_Anhor_History.pdf?t=1493214503869 this page has a history of designs.  Not an expert as I say, but those models look very old.


Rob Kirkham   

On Aug 21, 2020, at 7:49 AM, Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:

Hi List Members,
 
I was sorting thru a box of junk I didn't even know I had, and I found these small ship anchors - see attached image. In my chosen scale (N) these are about 9 feet in length as can be seen on the scale ruler. Doing a quick internet search on "ship anchor dimensions" confirms that anchors of this size do (and did) indeed exist.
 
I assume ship anchors were shipped in steam era freight cars? I ask because I have not yet ever seen a photo of such a shipment.
 
Would they be shipped on flat cars? In gondolas? Would they have simply been tied down, or would they have been blocked in some way to keep them from shifting around during transit?
 
Any thoughts? Conjectures? Factual information? All are welcome.
 
Claus Schlund
 
<20200821_103337.jpg>


Re: Ship anchors?

Edward
 
Edited

The anchors you show are what's called a kedge anchor, with a top crossbar that can be permanent, or able to be folded down along the shank for easier storage.
It is a late 18th century design, sill made, but now for small craft. 

Anchors for a flatcar load would be more like those used on large naval vessels and ocean going ships since the late 19th century, having two large flukes attached to a shank with an eyelet for attaching the anchor chain. At about 10 tons or so each, four such anchors would make a good flat car load, held in place with wood blocking.  The attached photo will show the scale of these anchors, from a person sitting by it. 

Ed Bommer


Ship anchors?

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
I was sorting thru a box of junk I didn't even know I had, and I found these small ship anchors - see attached image. In my chosen scale (N) these are about 9 feet in length as can be seen on the scale ruler. Doing a quick internet search on "ship anchor dimensions" confirms that anchors of this size do (and did) indeed exist.
 
I assume ship anchors were shipped in steam era freight cars? I ask because I have not yet ever seen a photo of such a shipment.
 
Would they be shipped on flat cars? In gondolas? Would they have simply been tied down, or would they have been blocked in some way to keep them from shifting around during transit?
 
Any thoughts? Conjectures? Factual information? All are welcome.
 
Claus Schlund
 

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