Date   

Re: SHPX 13141

Peter Ness
 

Hi Chuck,

OK, now I'm getting a creepy feeling. I grew up in MA in a town served
by the New Haven which I model. Now I live in OH two towns away from
Painesville and Fairport Harbor - and commute to work through
Painesville 5 days a week.

I know historically this part of OH was "the Western Reserve" since it
was part of CT for a while, but the Naugatuck Chemical connection is
just plain eerie (not Erie, which is about 50 miles East).

Thanks for the information!

Regards,

Peter Ness


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, RUTLANDRS@... wrote:

Peter,
The Naugatuck Chemical Company also had a large plant in Painesville,
Ohio on the Fairport, Painesville and Eastern (FP&E). In the 50's all
I
recall were black tank cars with no logo.
Chuck Hladik
Rutland Railroad
Virginia Division


Re: model car weight

Eric Hansmann
 

Pierre,

I have been adding weight to cars at 75% of the NMRA recommendations. Newer truck sideframes and wheelsets are much better than the materials used when the NMRA recommendations were first implemented. My rolling stock has had many scale miles operating on a club layout with other rolling stock weighted to NMRA recommendations and some weighted a bit more. No problems.

Eric



Eric Hansmann
Chagrin Falls, Ohio
Modeling the railroads of Newburgh, Ohio, circa 1926
http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Pierre" <pierre.oliver@...> wrote:

With the growing use of semi-scale wheel sets and their improved rolling characteristics, has anyone done any research or have an opinion on the suggested weight of model freight cars?
I thought I had heard one opinion that the the NMRA RP for car weight are somewhat heavy for today's better rolling models.
Thanks,
Pierre Oliver


Re: Painting whisker couplers

Tim O'Connor
 

Ron

I throw the couplers into an old Athearn kit box, and airbrush
them 50 at a time with thin dirty rusty overspray. Usually no two
are exactly alike. Once I've installed the couplers I dab on some
Neo-Lube on the springs and trip pins.

Tim O'Connor

At 7/22/2010 08:05 PM Thursday, you wrote:
Does anyone have a neat solution to painting whisker couplers?

For regular Kadees I fold a piece of masking tape over the shank, which effectively keeps paint off the nice slick bearing surfaces and allows me to position the set of taped couplers so as to get minimum paint on maximum surface.

I've found more and more use for whisker couplers, especially in retrofitting ones that didn't spring so well, and I have needed to paint some to go onto pre-painted cars. I'm really reluctant to wrap masking tape over the spring for fear that it'll take the spring with it, and I don't want to paint the things shank and all.

Comments? Remember that in 1960 it was perfectly permissible to paint couplers, especially the top and sides of the head, and it shows in photos. That's why I'm posting here, because others in this group might need to do so also.

Ron Merrick


Re: SHPX 13141

Ed Hawkins
 

On Jul 22, 2010, at 6:18 PM, Peter Ness wrote:

First off, forgive me if this car is beyond the scope of the group. I
don't think it is, but perhaps the lessee may be. If so, apologies in
advance.

This car appears to be either a 10000 gallon or insulated 8000 gallon
car. The car is of interest to me for several reasons;
<snip>

Peter,
SHPX 13141 was one of 53 10,000-gallon insulated ICC 103 Type 27 tank
cars built by AC&F as part of lot no. 2141A. They were used for asphalt
and assigned to series 13123-13175. All of the cars had heater pipes. A
builder's photo of 13125, built 11-40, was plainly lettered for
Shippers' Car Line without any lessee stencils. No doubt that through
the years different lessees used the cars and some with sporty
lettering.

There were 17 additional cars built to the same specs (but without
heater pipes) in lot 2141, numbered 13116-13122 and 13176-13175. SHPX
13119 was the only car having a full dome platform with hand rails.
These latter 17 cars were for latex and were leased to a number of
companies in small groups painted/lettered a variety of ways for
Revertex Corp. of America, Heveatex Corp., Charles T. Wilson Co.
(liquid latex), General Latex and Chemical Corp., Wecoline Products,
and 9 cars simply lettered for Shippers' Car Line.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Painting whisker couplers

mopacfirst
 

Does anyone have a neat solution to painting whisker couplers?

For regular Kadees I fold a piece of masking tape over the shank, which effectively keeps paint off the nice slick bearing surfaces and allows me to position the set of taped couplers so as to get minimum paint on maximum surface.

I've found more and more use for whisker couplers, especially in retrofitting ones that didn't spring so well, and I have needed to paint some to go onto pre-painted cars. I'm really reluctant to wrap masking tape over the spring for fear that it'll take the spring with it, and I don't want to paint the things shank and all.

Comments? Remember that in 1960 it was perfectly permissible to paint couplers, especially the top and sides of the head, and it shows in photos. That's why I'm posting here, because others in this group might need to do so also.

Ron Merrick


Meat Reefer usage

gn3397 <heninger@...>
 

Group,
I have read the various articles on meat reefers published over the years, primarily by Martin Lofton and Richard Hendrickson, but I still have a few questions about their traffic patterns, and am trying to ascertain whether some of the roadnames are appropriate for my location and era.

I recently obtained the 1952 Sanborn Maps for Minot, ND, which was an important division point on the GN mainline. There was at the time a Swift and Co. branch house, as well as an Armour Co. creamery in town, so I am supposing that Swift and Armour reefers are appropriate. But I am wondering if the grocery wholesalers in Minot would have received packaged meats from Wilson's, Cudahy, Rath, etc., or were these reefers not seen in the Great Plains states? I know that brands used to be much more regional in the steam era. Does anyone know of a listing of the various states that these companies did business in?

Thanks for any assistance.

Sincerely,
Bob Heninger
Iowa City, IA


SHPX 13141

Peter Ness
 

First off, forgive me if this car is beyond the scope of the group. I
don't think it is, but perhaps the lessee may be. If so, apologies in
advance.

This car appears to be either a 10000 gallon or insulated 8000 gallon
car. The car is of interest to me for several reasons;

The photo of the car is from beyond the time of this group by about 6
years and the roadnumber lettering seems fairly "modern" to my eye (but
I am darned sure the car itself qualifies!) and it has (to me) an
interesting logo on the tank side; The logo is circular and perhaps 2/3
the diameter of the tank dome. It has a white outer trim ring with a
red band inside that, containing lettering (illegible in photo). Inside
of this red circular band with white lettering is a white circle that
contains what resembles a yacht pennant. The pennant is blue and
contains a white shape that may be an elongated diamond on the middle,
with possible more detail in this white shape. This interests me
because by the time the photo was taken it seems most leased tank cars
were becoming bland without much lessee identification, and if present
more likely to be lettering and not a flashy, colorful logo!

It's also interesting to me because the tank car immediately behind SHPX
13141 has the same logo, so there were at least two cars so painted!

Even more (to me), I've been told by a trusted source that this "may"
(operative word) have been leased by US Rubber, which was affilated wtih
Naugatuck Chemical, which was located on the New Haven Railroad, which I
model!

In the best of all worlds, someone could confirm for me that SHPX 13141
fits within the era of this group, who leased it with the fancy logo
which is also within the era of this group, be able to identify the car
type and number series and wonder of wonders, perhaps share (or point me
to) a photo that clearly shows the logo. I guess all that would be left
after that would be if someone could educate me to what model would be
correct (if there is one) and who makes the decals (Ha! might as well
ask for the moon, right?)

Thanks in advance,

Peter Ness


Re: Milwaukee convention report

kenneth broomfield
 

I was at the NRHS convention in Scranton PA and left my 1000 mile jacket at the
house because I knew it would be to darn hot. So you my have a point.

Kenny Broomfield




________________________________
From: Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@virginia.edu>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Mon, July 19, 2010 12:22:02 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Milwaukee convention report

 
Tony,

Could it be they just left their vests at home because they thought it
was too hot in Milwaukee?

Kind regards,

Garth Groff

Anthony Thompson wrote:
An amazing observation was made at the Milwaukee NMRA
convention last week. Only a single individual wearing the traditional
"vest" with a patch collection was spotted. Either the fun poked at
vesties has caused them to retire those garments, or maybe the older
crowd which favored them has passed on. But the days when masses of
NMRA members were synonymous with vest wearing appear to have passed.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Hercules Powder tankcar et al.

Peter Ness
 

There is a neat photo of UTLX 17xxx (356, maybe?) in the late Dave
Sweetland's New Haven Color Pictorial Vol 3; the West End. Appears to
my uneducated eye to be an 8,000 gal car in a consist, probably
departing Cedar Hill heading to Boston. I say it's a neat photo,
because its enjoyable to view, but the consist is not the main item in
the photo, so hard (again, for the neophyte like me) to pick out as much
info as is probably there. The photo is probably taken between
1952-1959.

Regards,

Peter Ness


Re: model car weight

reporterllc
 

I have always weighted my cars to NMRA specs. They have been very reliable. I would think that it would be better to err on the side of being heavier than lighter. I think the heavier weight of the metal wheels tracks better than plastic too.

As to the Sergents, I would switch in a heartbeast but like some, I have just a few locations that are out of reach, so I need some sort of automatic coupler. The Kadee 58's are working fine and plastic automatic couplers are bad news in my book as I have had many fail.

Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana


Re: SHPX 13141

Charles Hladik
 

Peter,
The Naugatuck Chemical Company also had a large plant in Painesville,
Ohio on the Fairport, Painesville and Eastern (FP&E). In the 50's all I
recall were black tank cars with no logo.
Chuck Hladik
Rutland Railroad
Virginia Division

In a message dated 7/22/2010 7:23:51 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
prness@roadrunner.com writes:





First off, forgive me if this car is beyond the scope of the group. I
don't think it is, but perhaps the lessee may be. If so, apologies in
advance.

This car appears to be either a 10000 gallon or insulated 8000 gallon
car. The car is of interest to me for several reasons;

The photo of the car is from beyond the time of this group by about 6
years and the roadnumber lettering seems fairly "modern" to my eye (but
I am darned sure the car itself qualifies!) and it has (to me) an
interesting logo on the tank side; The logo is circular and perhaps 2/3
the diameter of the tank dome. It has a white outer trim ring with a
red band inside that, containing lettering (illegible in photo). Inside
of this red circular band with white lettering is a white circle that
contains what resembles a yacht pennant. The pennant is blue and
contains a white shape that may be an elongated diamond on the middle,
with possible more detail in this white shape. This interests me
because by the time the photo was taken it seems most leased tank cars
were becoming bland without much lessee identification, and if present
more likely to be lettering and not a flashy, colorful logo!

It's also interesting to me because the tank car immediately behind SHPX
13141 has the same logo, so there were at least two cars so painted!

Even more (to me), I've been told by a trusted source that this "may"
(operative word) have been leased by US Rubber, which was affilated wtih
Naugatuck Chemical, which was located on the New Haven Railroad, which I
model!

In the best of all worlds, someone could confirm for me that SHPX 13141
fits within the era of this group, who leased it with the fancy logo
which is also within the era of this group, be able to identify the car
type and number series and wonder of wonders, perhaps share (or point me
to) a photo that clearly shows the logo. I guess all that would be left
after that would be if someone could educate me to what model would be
correct (if there is one) and who makes the decals (Ha! might as well
ask for the moon, right?)

Thanks in advance,

Peter Ness


Re: Interesting painting instructions

Greg Martin
 

Elden,

The simple answer is that in most cases paint doesn't stick to galvanized metal. Now, saying that I know for a fact the the Rustoleum CO. made a specific primer for galvanized metal called ... yes you guessed it Galvoleum Clear Blue Tint. This primer essentially never dried to much more than a tacky surface and you painted your top coat over that, But it was very expensive even in the early seventies. But eventually even this would break down and the paint would come off but it worked much better than the alternative.

I believe that if it was even available to the railroads, I think the frame of mind was, "who cars it's going to come off anyway, so why bother?"

Greg Martin

-----Original Message-----
From: Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@usace.army.mil>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thu, Jul 22, 2010 12:03 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Interesting painting instructions




With all the recent talk on painting, I have here some interesting
instructions from the PRRT&HS files:

For class X29D (X29 rebuilds),

General: Car sides, door, ends and roof sheets seam caps to be painted (one
coat with synthetic freight car primer)...

And then that the entire car be painted with synthetic freight car paint.

So, why no primer on the roof sheets? Did this whole thing confuse the
shops? Apparently, because one sees box cars with painted roofs, unpainted
but for seam cap roofs, and even some coasted with asphaltum.

Standard Railroad of the World; not so fast....

Elden Gatwood


Interesting painting instructions

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

With all the recent talk on painting, I have here some interesting
instructions from the PRRT&HS files:

For class X29D (X29 rebuilds),

General: Car sides, door, ends and roof sheets seam caps to be painted (one
coat with synthetic freight car primer)...

And then that the entire car be painted with synthetic freight car paint.

So, why no primer on the roof sheets? Did this whole thing confuse the
shops? Apparently, because one sees box cars with painted roofs, unpainted
but for seam cap roofs, and even some coasted with asphaltum.

Standard Railroad of the World; not so fast....

Elden Gatwood


Re: model car weight

William Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Mark, Fred, and Group,

If I may, I would like to add some to Mark's response.

I have about ten cars (presently my total operational fleet) equipped with Sergent couplers and as Mark states, they work great. Because my layout is under construction and not yet in operation the experience that I have had with these cars and their couplers has been on the layouts of others. I have operated my small way freight many times without any coupler mishap. The one item that I have noticed is that operations tend to be a bit slower as one is not using the in-track magnetic ramps and also sometimes having to align the coupler manually (just like the real thing). Coupling is a good deal more realistic without the need for a good "bump" on the car being coupled to.

Overall, operations with the Sergent couplers is a very enjoyable experience.

Happy modeling... and operations,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On Jul 21, 2010, at 6:48 PM, Mark Morgan wrote:

Work great. I have a layout at home. Put a sergent on the rear FTb and another on a RibSide Milwaukee boxcar. The Boxcar had a #58 on the other end. Ran this set for around a month. Went to change engines and forgot about the Sergent. No problems and hope to replace all with these. They look and act like the real thing.

Mark Morgan

--- On Wed, 7/21/10, Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@yahoo.com> wrote:

From: Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] model car weight
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, July 21, 2010, 7:30 PM



Mark,



May I ask how the use of Sargent couplers is working out for your operating sessions?



Fred Freitas

--- On Wed, 7/21/10, bnonut@yahoo.com <bnonut@yahoo.com> wrote:

From: bnonut@yahoo.com <bnonut@yahoo.com>

Subject: Re: [STMFC] model car weight

To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com

Date: Wednesday, July 21, 2010, 5:48 PM

One party, NMRA member, told us the original weight requirements were put in place for the early trucks. Guy models the B&O in the fifties. He had quite a few articles in Railroad Model Journal.

I usually use two large nuts per boxcar. Leave one truck loose and keep the other tighter.

Prefer the semiscale wheels and sergent couplers.

Mark Morgan

Sent on the Sprint Now Network from my BlackBerry

-----Original Message-----

From: "Pierre" <pierre.oliver@start.ca>

Sender: STMFC@yahoogroups.com

Date: Wed, 21 Jul 2010 21:38:06

To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>

Reply-To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com

Subject: [STMFC] model car weight

With the growing use of semi-scale wheel sets and their improved rolling characteristics, has anyone done any research or have an opinion on the suggested weight of model freight cars?

I thought I had heard one opinion that the the NMRA RP for car weight are somewhat heavy for today's better rolling models.

Thanks,

Pierre Oliver

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: model car weight

Mark
 

Good one!!! Actually the idea from another manufacturer(branchline)!
Hardware store in Bellville,Ohio is where the 3/4 inch ones, coarse thread steel.
Well at work so better get going.

Mark Morgan
Sent on the Sprint Now Network from my BlackBerry

-----Original Message-----
From: "grsjr@att.net" <GRSJr@att.net>
Sender: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thu, 22 Jul 2010 14:56:57
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Reply-To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: model car weight



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, bnonut@... wrote:

One party, NMRA member, told us the original weight requirements were put in place for the early trucks. Guy models the B&O in the fifties. He had quite a few articles in Railroad Model Journal.
I usually use two large nuts per boxcar. Leave one truck loose and keep the other tighter.
Prefer the semiscale wheels and sergent couplers.

Mark Morgan
Mark,

Do you use walnuts or pecans?

Ray


Re: SAL XM-1 Boxcar (B4)

golden1014
 

Right, Tim--good catch and thanks for the correction. John

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


John, I know for sure in some cases the 40-ton or 50-ton capacity of
a box car was strictly a matter of the trucks, and not the car itself.
Wabash had old trucks put under some new box cars and these cars were
rated at 40 tons. So the differences in crossbearers of the B-4 and
B-5 may, or may not, have anything to do with their capacities.

Tim O'Connor


If it means anything, the B-4 was a 40-ton car, and the B-5--which used only the single heavy crossbearer--was a 50-ton car. You would think the application of the bearers would be reversed.
John Golden
Bloomington, IN


Re: model car weight

grsjr@att.net <GRSJr@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, bnonut@... wrote:

One party, NMRA member, told us the original weight requirements were put in place for the early trucks. Guy models the B&O in the fifties. He had quite a few articles in Railroad Model Journal.
I usually use two large nuts per boxcar. Leave one truck loose and keep the other tighter.
Prefer the semiscale wheels and sergent couplers.

Mark Morgan
Mark,

Do you use walnuts or pecans?

Ray


Re: April 18, 1955 Railway Age-A big Thank you!

Bill Welch
 

I wanted to thank the several people who responded to my message requesting help with Railway Age and Gary Roe who was able to send me a PDF of the 12 pages involved. I did not realize that there was actually a series of articles, all of which will be especially helpful in writing about the FGE-WFE-BRE mechanicals.

Here is something to think about: In the early 1950's it would have been possible to see FGE-WFE truss rod reefers coupled to FGE-WFE-BRE mechanical reefers.

This list that Mike Brock created has helped many of us through the years. Thank you Mike for your selfless efforts to create this network.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

I am wondering if anyone on this list has a copy of the Railway Age from April 18, 1955. I believe the date is correct but the copy I have of the article I have is not sharp so I could be off in terms of the day of the month. The article in question is "Mechanical Cooling Pays Its Way" by C. B. Peck.

If you have a copy, or access to one, could you please contact me offline at fgexbill@... I would like to try to get a better copy of this article for my reseach.

Thanks!

Bill Welch


Re: model car weight

estcbq@...
 

i have for a number of years used Proto wheel sets in Accurail Bettendorf sideframes and found that combination to be more than acceptable on 3-3/4 oz cars---jim young

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wed, Jul 21, 2010 6:58 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Re: model car weight





Gary

What I meant was is that you can't draw many useful conclusions
from a test of two wheelsets in one truck -- to find the best
performance you have try many different combinations of trucks,
car weights, wheelsets, etc. If I got the results that your
friend did, my probable conclusion would be that the combination
of that particular metal wheelset in that particular truck on
that particular car wasn't any good! :-)

For the last couple of years I've been roll testing each car
as the "last step" after construction. I get all kinds of results
but I almost always find a combination that works well. I've been
surprised by how well Proto 2000 trucks and wheels roll -- and how
badly some others do. Tahoe trucks are consistently the best of
the best.

Tim O'Connor

In his rollability testing, Brian used the same box car with the same
trucks, swapping out the wheelsets for the tests. So the only variable was
the wheelsets themselves.

gary roe
quincy, illinois

_____

Sent: Wednesday, July 21, 2010 5:48 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: model car weight

Gary

A lot of factors influence performance - metal or plastic, sintered or
machined metal, machined brass or machined nickel silver, dirt or oil on
the track, pointed or shoulder journals, fat taper or narrow taper, metal
or abs or delrin sideframes, equalized vs nonequalized, sprung or
unsprung...
But all else being equal, my experience is that metal wheels outlast and
outperform plastic wheels by a huge margin in HO scale. If you think about
the physics of wheels on rails, the weight of an N scale car per square
centimeter of rail contact is far less than it is for HO scale cars, so
direct performance comparisons are not meaningful between N and HO scales
(or between HO and O, or O scale and 1:1)








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Rails by the River ~ PAC NOR WEST ~ Prototype Modelers Meet

Greg Martin
 

Rails by the River ~ PAC NOR WEST ~ Prototype Modelers Meet

Date: August 20th and 21st, 2010 Mark you Calendar!

Location: Center 50+ Salem Senior Center
3615 Portland Road NE
Salem, OR 97301

Friday from 3 PM until 9 PM
Saturday from 8 AM until 5 PM

We Welcome All Scales All Eras All Model Railroad Interest

* Clinics and Prototype Presentations scheduled for Friday evening
and all Day Saturday
* There will be vendors /manufacturers representing their products
* Operating FREE-MO Layout ~ Freight cars ~ Locomotives ~ Passenger
Cars
* Dioramas ~Historical Societies Structures ~Standard and Narrow
Gauge
* All Railroads from all Eras are Welcome and all Skill levels are
encouraged
Pre registration for both days is $25.00 or $30.00 at the door

Saturday only registration $20.00 Registration at the door begins Friday
at 3 PM

Contact : __http://railsbytheriver.com/__ (http://railsbytheriver.com/_)
(_http://railsbytheriver.com/_ (http://railsbytheriver.com/) )
(_http://railsbyttheriver.com_ (http://railsbyttheriver.com/) )

Phone: (503) 581-4758 (503) 930-4916 cell

email: _tgregmrtn@aol.com_ (_mailto:tgregmrtn@aol.com_
(mailto:tgregmrtn@aol.com) )

93161 - 93180 of 185005