Date   

Re: MILW 50' dbl dr box cars

Tim O'Connor
 

Staffan, I don't know if it helps but I have a builder shot of MILW 13631
that showss a 7 rung ladder on the end, and 9 rung ladders on the sides.
A 1960's photo of MILW 16277 shows 9 rung ladders on sides and ends.

I was going to call Intermountain to try to buy some of their 9-rung
ladder sprues, since two of the ladders in my kit are broken. In the
past IRC has been good about selling parts sprues, cheap.

Tim O'Connor

At 11/14/2009 04:19 PM Saturday, you wrote:
I bought a Rib Side Cars 50' box car double door short ribs plain end kit at the Naperville meet. The instructions say "these cars had 9 rung ladders on the sides and ends". There are only two nine rung ladders in the kit. I can build the additional two nine ring ladders but would prefer to have a picture of one of these cars series 14000-14249 to make sure I do it correctly. Would anyone have a picture of one of these cars that could be shared?

Staffan Ehnbom


Pre-Trip Inspection

Bob C <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

Does someone have a good definition of a pre-trip inspection, preferably from a rule book or manual?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


MILW 50' dbl dr box cars

frtcar <staffan.ehnbom@...>
 

I bought a Rib Side Cars 50' box car double door short ribs plain end kit at the Naperville meet. The instructions say "these cars had 9 rung ladders on the sides and ends". There are only two nine rung ladders in the kit. I can build the additional two nine ring ladders but would prefer to have a picture of one of these cars series 14000-14249 to make sure I do it correctly. Would anyone have a picture of one of these cars that could be shared?

Staffan Ehnbom


Re: New To Group - Question About Transporting Fish Via Ice Reefers

Donald B. Valentine
 

--- In STMFC@..., Al Daumann <sp-blackwidow@...> wrote:

Greetings,
    Both the model railroad club I belong to (Santa Susana Railroad Historical Society in Simi Valley, CA) and my home layout (10' x 12' bedroom, the Burney, Redding & Western set in Northern California in the late 1940s) have reefer traffic.  I hope to learn and hopefully, eventually contribute some to the group.  Initially, it will likely be more questions than answers.

  On my freelanced home model railroad, I am considering modeling the transportation of fresh ocean fish from Northern California (e.g. Eureka) to points inland (e.g. Redding) and was wondering whether fresh / fresh frozen fish was transported in iced reefers in the late 1940s / early 1950s?  If so, does any one have any links or references to "fish ops" or "fish reefers"?  If they existed, were "fish reefers" dedicated to fish only service (not sure folks would want their strawberries or magazines smelling like an old mackerel)?

 I'm looking for thoughts on if / how common it was to transport fish in reefers and how credible it would to model such service in Northern California in the late 40s / early 50s.

 Thanks in advance,

Al Daumann

Hello Al,

Guess I'll have to echo Tony for the most part but from the opposite side of the nation. Up into the early 1950's express reefers
with iced fresh fish and other seafood were regularly seen on The Gull, which operated between Boston, Mass. and Halifax, Nova Scotia
on a dailey basis via the B&M, MEC, CPR and CNR. It should be remembered that many of the people in Nova Scotia's Annapolis Valley
were the desecendants of the New England Planters. These were people
from Connecticut largely who responded to the Royal Governor's call in 1763 and 1764 for settlers to occupy farms abandoned by the French after the French & Indian War. In the last two decades of the 1800's many of the descendants of these people returned to New England, largely to the suburban Boston area. For the next 50 to 60 years it appears that it was largely these same people that contributed to a higher consumption of fish in the Boston area than found in many major cities. My own grandmother was one of these people and she worked for the B&M for 32 years. Fish was common on her table and she knew exactly when it came and when and where to get what she wanted at that best price! It seems hard to believe with the large fishing fleets in Gloucester and Cape Ann, not to mention Fall River and New Bedford, but that is the way things were in the first half of the 1900's in the Boston area. An express reefer of fish on The Gull was a regular thing and two cars were not uncommon.

Hope this helps even if not California based info, Don Valentine


Re: Heavy Laser Cut Paper for Running Boards, etc

Jim Hayes
 

Very interesting. Looks good. I'd like to see a sample.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon
www.sunshinekits.com

On Sat, Nov 14, 2009 at 8:15 AM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...>wrote:



On the Perth Military Modeling site under their new products is a new
concept using heavy laser cut paper for details like light guards on
armor vehicles to achieve a more accurate rendition.

This looks like an ideal way to achieve more accurate steel running
boards and they could be more easily be glued to house cars and tank
cars. Jon Cagle, are you watching?

Here is the link: http://www.perthmilitarymodelling.com/newkitnews/
kamizukuri.htm

Bill Welch


Heavy Laser Cut Paper for Running Boards, etc

Bill Welch
 

On the Perth Military Modeling site under their new products is a new concept using heavy laser cut paper for details like light guards on armor vehicles to achieve a more accurate rendition.

This looks like an ideal way to achieve more accurate steel running boards and they could be more easily be glued to house cars and tank cars. Jon Cagle, are you watching?

Here is the link: http://www.perthmilitarymodelling.com/newkitnews/ kamizukuri.htm

Bill Welch


Re: Nov 15, 1957

Jeff Coleman
 

the 500 car train ran in the Fall of 1967 not 1957, many problems with the slave units, train line air and broken couplers end the testing
Jeff Coleman

--- In STMFC@..., "Mike Brock" <brockm@...> wrote:

Dave Nelson notes:

"1957 - Longest and heaviest train (500 coal cars, 4 miles long, 42,000
tons) hauled by Norfolk and Western Railroad between Iager, West Virginia
and Portsmouth, Ohio".

I believe one of the N&W books described this operation which was...as I
recall...an experiment. I'll do some research on it if no one else has the
info.

Mike Brock


Painting trucks.

Gordon <boomer44@...>
 

I wash my trucks with a pumice type hand-cleaner. Paint with Polly S Rail Brown. Works fine.

Gordon Spalty


Re: New To Group - Question About Transporting Fish Via Ice Reefers

acacd_ssp
 

Tony,
  Thanks for the prompt and detailed reply.  Unfortunately, the portion of my railroad from Redding to Eureka consists of leaving my main yard (Redding), then disappearing through a wall into a closet staging yard which represents Eureka (sorry - no rugged mountain scenes there).  The main portion of the layout room covers the mainline from Redding to Bieber (Nubieber).  My freelanced railroad is very loosely model after both the McCloud and the Northwestern Pacific, both of which I have interchange with, following the route of current California Highway 299 from Eureka to Bieber. 

  I don't have much passenger traffic (I think the NWP had two trains in each direction from Eureka to the Bay Area in my era), so it sounds like I should ship the fish in the express reefers on my passenger trains.  Any idea what type of quantity (i.e. car loads) would be shipped daily?  It doesn't seem as if dedicated reefer trains with fish or even long blocks would be in order, rather just a car or two per day?

 Again, thanks in advance for the info.

Al Daumann




________________________________
From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Fri, November 13, 2009 9:55:13 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] New To Group - Question About Transporting Fish Via Ice Reefers

 
Al Daumann wrote:
Both the model railroad club I belong to (Santa Susana Railroad
Historical Society in Simi Valley, CA) and my home layout (10' x 12'
bedroom, the Burney, Redding & Western set in Northern California in
the late 1940s) have reefer traffic. I hope to learn and hopefully,
eventually contribute some to the group. Initially, it will likely
be more questions than answers.
On my freelanced home model railroad, I am considering modeling
the transportation of fresh ocean fish from Northern California
(e.g. Eureka) to points inland (e.g. Redding) and was wondering
whether fresh / fresh frozen fish was transported in iced reefers in
the late 1940s / early 1950s? If so, does any one have any links or
references to "fish ops" or "fish reefers"? If they existed, were
"fish reefers" dedicated to fish only service (not sure folks would
want their strawberries or magazines smelling like an old mackerel)?
I'm looking for thoughts on if / how common it was to transport
fish in reefers and how credible it would to model such service in
Northern California in the late 40s / early 50s.
To my knowledge, this was almost entirely in express reefers and,
for shorter distances, in baggage cars with the fish in boxes of
coarse ice. This of course permitted transportation at passenger
schedule speed. The PFE people I interviewed stated that fish was
rarely if ever carried in conventional (RS) reefers.
If your railroad runs west from Redding to the ocean, I sure
would like to see your mountain modeling some day! that's some rugged
territory.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress. com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturep ress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: New To Group - Question About Transporting Fish Via Ice Reefers

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Al Daumann wrote:
Both the model railroad club I belong to (Santa Susana Railroad Historical Society in Simi Valley, CA) and my home layout (10' x 12' bedroom, the Burney, Redding & Western set in Northern California in the late 1940s) have reefer traffic. I hope to learn and hopefully, eventually contribute some to the group. Initially, it will likely be more questions than answers.
On my freelanced home model railroad, I am considering modeling the transportation of fresh ocean fish from Northern California (e.g. Eureka) to points inland (e.g. Redding) and was wondering whether fresh / fresh frozen fish was transported in iced reefers in the late 1940s / early 1950s? If so, does any one have any links or references to "fish ops" or "fish reefers"? If they existed, were "fish reefers" dedicated to fish only service (not sure folks would want their strawberries or magazines smelling like an old mackerel)?
I'm looking for thoughts on if / how common it was to transport fish in reefers and how credible it would to model such service in Northern California in the late 40s / early 50s.
To my knowledge, this was almost entirely in express reefers and, for shorter distances, in baggage cars with the fish in boxes of coarse ice. This of course permitted transportation at passenger schedule speed. The PFE people I interviewed stated that fish was rarely if ever carried in conventional (RS) reefers.
If your railroad runs west from Redding to the ocean, I sure would like to see your mountain modeling some day! that's some rugged territory.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


New To Group - Question About Transporting Fish Via Ice Reefers

acacd_ssp
 

Greetings,
    Both the model railroad club I belong to (Santa Susana Railroad Historical Society in Simi Valley, CA) and my home layout (10' x 12' bedroom, the Burney, Redding & Western set in Northern California in the late 1940s) have reefer traffic.  I hope to learn and hopefully, eventually contribute some to the group.  Initially, it will likely be more questions than answers.

  On my freelanced home model railroad, I am considering modeling the transportation of fresh ocean fish from Northern California (e.g. Eureka) to points inland (e.g. Redding) and was wondering whether fresh / fresh frozen fish was transported in iced reefers in the late 1940s / early 1950s?  If so, does any one have any links or references to "fish ops" or "fish reefers"?  If they existed, were "fish reefers" dedicated to fish only service (not sure folks would want their strawberries or magazines smelling like an old mackerel)?

 I'm looking for thoughts on if / how common it was to transport fish in reefers and how credible it would to model such service in Northern California in the late 40s / early 50s.

 Thanks in advance,

Al Daumann

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Nov 15, 1957

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Dave Nelson notes:

"1957 - Longest and heaviest train (500 coal cars, 4 miles long, 42,000
tons) hauled by Norfolk and Western Railroad between Iager, West Virginia
and Portsmouth, Ohio".

I believe one of the N&W books described this operation which was...as I recall...an experiment. I'll do some research on it if no one else has the info.

Mike Brock


Red Cabbose tooling for sale

Jim Hayes
 

Red Caboose has an ad in the November RMC listing "All Tooling For Sale"
Looks like we're losing another good freight car source.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon
www.sunshinekits.com


Re: Chicago & Illinois Midland Mather Cars(?)

gary laakso
 

Thanks! That is far more information then the book provided.

gary laakso
south of Mike Brock
vasa0vasa@...

----- Original Message -----
From: Ray Breyer
To: STMFC@...
Sent: 11/13/2009 8:47:40 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Chicago & Illinois Midland Mather Cars(?)



Morning Sun Books new work on the
C&IM has a July, 1960 picture at page 121 of 2 forty
foot boxcars, 500 and 501, that appear to be Mather cars now
with welded side sheets, retained wooden doors and wooden
end beams over metal sheeted ends. The caption offers
no assistance identifying the cars: "Although superficially
similar to the 8000 series Mather box cars the C&IM
leased for may years, the two cars are dimensionally
different in every dimension except the width of the door
(6ft.). The 500 series cars appeared on the roster after the
Mather car lease expired in July of 1956. Numbered 500
to 506, they were 40' long with a 40 ton capacity.
Rebuilt from older composite cars, they retained their wood
doors.....The cars were used for LCL service to local
stations along the mainline." The trucks cannot be
identified in the dark shadows under the car.
gary laakso
Hi Gary,

Richard Hendrickson identified these cars as ex-Erie 71000-71999 series rebuilds, and provided me with a clear photo of Erie 71497. The car has a build date of 12-1923, and a reweigh of 8-1941. Checking the 1935 ORER shows that these cars were just coming on line. The 1945 ORER shows the number series as 71000-71567. The closest Erie diagram book I have to this time span is 1957, and that number series isn't listed at all.

These cars were never Mathers cars, showed up only after the C&IM dropped passenger service in 1953, and were never carried on the roster as revenue cars, so I have no idea how many there were. I've got a color photo of C&IM 602 pulling one through Pekin in 1954, but that's the only photo I have of these cars.

Hope this helps!
Ray Breyer




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Chicago & Illinois Midland Mather Cars(?)

Ray Breyer
 

Morning Sun Books new work on the
C&IM has a July, 1960 picture at page 121 of 2 forty
foot boxcars, 500 and 501, that appear to be Mather cars now
with welded side sheets, retained wooden doors and wooden
end beams over metal sheeted ends.  The caption offers
no assistance identifying the cars: "Although superficially
similar to the 8000 series Mather box cars the C&IM
leased for may years, the two cars are dimensionally
different in every dimension except the width of the door
(6ft.). The 500 series cars appeared on the roster after the
Mather car lease expired in July of 1956.  Numbered 500
to 506, they were 40' long with a 40 ton capacity. 
Rebuilt from older composite cars, they retained their wood
doors.....The cars were used for LCL service to local
stations along the mainline."  The trucks cannot be
identified in the dark shadows under the car. 
gary laakso

Hi Gary,

Richard Hendrickson identified these cars as ex-Erie 71000-71999 series rebuilds, and provided me with a clear photo of Erie 71497. The car has a build date of 12-1923, and a reweigh of 8-1941. Checking the 1935 ORER shows that these cars were just coming on line. The 1945 ORER shows the number series as 71000-71567. The closest Erie diagram book I have to this time span is 1957, and that number series isn't listed at all.

These cars were never Mathers cars, showed up only after the C&IM dropped passenger service in 1953, and were never carried on the roster as revenue cars, so I have no idea how many there were. I've got a color photo of C&IM 602 pulling one through Pekin in 1954, but that's the only photo I have of these cars.

Hope this helps!
Ray Breyer


Chicago & Illinois Midland Mather Cars(?)

gary laakso
 

Morning Sun Books new work on the C&IM has a July, 1960 picture at page 121 of 2 forty foot boxcars, 500 and 501, that appear to be Mather cars now with welded side sheets, retained wooden doors and wooden end beams over metal sheeted ends. The caption offers no assistance identifying the cars: "Although superficially similar to the 8000 series Mather box cars the C&IM leased for may years, the two cars are dimensionally different in every dimension except the width of the door (6ft.). The 500 series cars appeared on the roster after the Mather car lease expired in July of 1956. Numbered 500 to 506, they were 40' long with a 40 ton capacity. Rebuilt from older composite cars, they retained their wood doors.....The cars were used for LCL service to local stations along the mainline." The trucks cannot be identified in the dark shadows under the car.


gary laakso
south of Mike Brock
vasa0vasa@...


Re: Nov 15, 1957

Tim O'Connor
 

I recall a news photo of one of the monster N&W coal trains in
a contemporaneous issue of Trains magazine. I think N&W was just
trying to push the edge of the envelope... Obviously it didn't
work out that well, but BNSF and UP today regularly run 20,000 ton
trains safely, for very long distances.

Makes me wonder how fast diesels would have taken over if work
rules simply specified a 12 hour day without any mileage limit.
Clearly with a mileage limit there was a powerful incentive to
run trains more slowly and with heavier tonnage. Still true today.

Tim

At 11/13/2009 05:54 PM Friday, you wrote:
I just came across this note in reference to Nov 15th.

"1957 - Longest and heaviest train (500 coal cars, 4 miles long, 42,000
tons) hauled by Norfolk and Western Railroad between Iager, West Virginia
and Portsmouth, Ohio".

500 cars? Really? If true, why not 5 sections?

Dave Nelson


Re: Nov 15, 1957

pierreoliver2003 <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Bragging rights?
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., "Dave Nelson" <Lake_Muskoka@...> wrote:

I just came across this note in reference to Nov 15th.

"1957 - Longest and heaviest train (500 coal cars, 4 miles long, 42,000
tons) hauled by Norfolk and Western Railroad between Iager, West Virginia
and Portsmouth, Ohio".

500 cars? Really? If true, why not 5 sections?

Dave Nelson


Nov 15, 1957

Dave Nelson
 

I just came across this note in reference to Nov 15th.

"1957 - Longest and heaviest train (500 coal cars, 4 miles long, 42,000
tons) hauled by Norfolk and Western Railroad between Iager, West Virginia
and Portsmouth, Ohio".

500 cars? Really? If true, why not 5 sections?

Dave Nelson


Re: Morton running boards

Ed Hawkins
 

On Nov 13, 2009, at 3:15 PM, Barry_Roth wrote:

Were all running boards made by Morton of the round-hole type? In
other words, when I see reference to a particular series of cars
having "Morton running board," am I safe in using a round-hole product
such as the Plano rb?

At the moment I'm working with an ATSF Bx-44 boxcar, but it would be
useful to know the answer in general terms. Thanks,

Barry Roth
Barry,
Yes. Morton running boards and brake steps all had holes. See my
article about all types of running boards in RP CYC Vol. 16 (shameless
plug).
Regards,
Ed Hawkins