Date   

Re: What do you guys use to drill holes in plastic and Resin?

Eric Hansmann
 

Tim,

I am not certain but I think the dimmer works with the older Dremels because of a change in the motor or motor brushes that occurred when the variable speed Dremels began appearing.

I used a metal double-outlet box and mounted a regular outlet and a dimmer switch. You can break off two tabs on the outlet to separate the two recepticles and wire as two separate circuits. Read the piece of paper that comes with a new outlet as the details are there. At least they were on my purchase. I wired one recepticle to the dimmer and one direct. The wiring was then ganged to a heavy duty extension cord to use as a portable unit. I marked VAR on the box beside the recepticle that is controlled by the dimmer. This dimmer control idea may have been covered in Model Rairoader many, many years ago.

By all means, if you have any questions about this, please consult an electrician first. I did.

The dimmer makes for good speed control of my old Dremel, which only has an on-off switch. I can adjust speed based upon material and drill size.

Eric



Eric Hansmann
Chagrin Falls, Ohio
Modeling the Railroads of Newburgh, Ohio, circa 1926:
http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Eric

That's an interesting idea, sounds better than the foot pedal.
I don't know about electrical stuff, but I think the old dimmers
used a rheostat (variable resistance) but the new dimmers use a
completely different technique -- perhaps that's why they don't
work so well with the Dremel?

Tim O'Connor


Re: Drilling plastic & resin

Eric Hansmann
 

Wow. I feel like I just left a lecture and came out with way more knowledge than when I sat down. Thank you for your insight professor Barger. You answered several open questions I've had over the years ranging from AHM upgrades to early Westerfield kit difficulties.

Some days I don't learn much, and then some days we get one post that has so much.

Eric




Eric Hansmann
Chagrin Falls, Ohio
Modeling the Railroads of Newburgh, Ohio, circa 1926:
http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/





--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "JP Barger" <bargerjp@...> wrote:

Guys:
After all the excellent useful emails sent by our knowledgable and
experienced drillers, there are some points not covered.
<snip>


Great Northern Flat Cars

Bob Kutella
 

I have had some 'downtime' recently but now am involved with a project trying to find photos of Great Northern 40 foot flatcars. I just spent a fair amount of time prowling the web but clearly my search keywords must be better phrased to yield any results.

I would greatly appreciate any leads or links to sites that might help me in my search.

Thanks in advance.

Bob Kutella


BLI NYC all-steel box cars - photos posted

pwkrueger <kruegerp@...>
 

BLI put eight photos of one of these cars on their web site this week. Here is a link to the first photo in the gallery:
http://www.broadway-limited.com/images/view.aspx?productId=2332

Paul Krueger
Seattle, WA


New MRH eZine is Available Free

Rhbale@...
 

The September-October 2010 issue of Model Railroad Hobbyist Magazine is
now available at the MRH website. As always, the magazine is free. Check
it out at
_www.model-railroad-hobbyist.com_ (http://www.model-railroad-hobbyist.com/)

Articles in this issue include:
Lessons in Passenger Car modeling
Part two on Kitbashing a U18B
Zip Texturing Resurrected
The On3 Cascade County Narrow Gauge
The N Scale Scioto Valley trackplan
Quick and Easy Stumps
and
Modeling 22 Floors up (planning a layout for a temporary residence in the
Middle East)

Richard Bale, news editor
Model Railroad Hobbyist Magazine


Re: What do you guys use to drill holes in plastic and Resin?

Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

Thanks to Doug Kinder for starting the thread on drilling in plastic and resin.
Thanks also for the collective wisdom of Brian Paul Ehni, Clark Cooper, Al Brown, Dennis Williams, Jerry Michels, Andy Sperandeo, Jerry Glow, Gary Laakso, Roger Robar, Bill Welch, Eric Hansmann, Chuck Peck, Clark Propst, Pierre Oliver, Adrian Hundhausen, Jim King, Steve Lucas, Jerry Michels, Scott Chatfield, Vince Pugliese, Tim O'Connor, John F. Pautz, JP Barger and Armand Premo.
This is the sort of thing I like to copy to a text file and save for future reference.
Gene Green


Re: Red Caboose SP flats sold out

Paul Lyons
 

Don't think this was for me. Paul

-----Original Message-----
From: Andy Carlson <midcentury@sbcglobal.net>
To: Steam Era <stmfc@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thu, Sep 9, 2010 4:06 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Red Caboose SP flats sold out




No more until January. sorry,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Red Caboose SP flats sold out

Andy Carlson
 

No more until January. sorry,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: What do you guys use to drill holes in plastic and Resin?

Trackman <jfpautz@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Gene" <bierglaeser@...> wrote:

Which is considered more accurate - collet or chuck?

Accurate is intended to mean accurately centered and parallel to the axis of rotation of the too.

Gene Green
Gene,

The collet is far more accurate.

John F. Pautz
American Switch & Signal
P:48 track components


Re: What do you guys use to drill holes in plastic and Resin?

Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

Which is considered more accurate - collet or chuck?

Accurate is intended to mean accurately centered and parallel to the axis of rotation of the too.

Gene Green


Re: What do you guys use to drill holes in plastic and Resin?

Tim O'Connor
 

Scott, in my own experience that's the opposite of what works for me.
I leave as little as possible of the drill sticking out of a pin vise.

But for my drill press, I use your method because it gives me the best
clearance for the chuck.

Tim O'Connor

Clamp the bit at a point double the length of the flutes. This minimizes flexure at the base of the flutes where the bit is weakest. In other words, if the flutes are 1/2" long, one inch of the bit should be stick out of the chuck.
Scott Chatfield


Re: What do you guys use to drill holes in plastic and Resin?

Tim O'Connor
 

Eric

That's an interesting idea, sounds better than the foot pedal.
I don't know about electrical stuff, but I think the old dimmers
used a rheostat (variable resistance) but the new dimmers use a
completely different technique -- perhaps that's why they don't
work so well with the Dremel?

Tim O'Connor

-------------------------------------------

I use my Dremel that I got back in the late-1970s. It is plugged into a special outlet that is wired to a light dimmer... I understand this type of variable electrical source does not work well with newer Dremel tools. Eric


Re: Beeswax, was how to drill into resin without breaking bits

Armand Premo
 

While this will not stop breakage,a better quality drill would significantly reduce the number.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: VINCE PUGLIESE
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, September 09, 2010 2:52 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Beeswax, was how to drill into resin without breaking bits



Or use something like Bur Life which is available in stick, liquid or paste
form:

http://www.riogrande.com/MemberArea/SearchPage.aspx?page=GRID&category|cat_112|236=Burlife

Helps when using a razor or jeweller's saw as well.

.vp

________________________________
From: dnaldimodaroloc <dnaldimodaroloc@yahoo.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thu, September 9, 2010 10:41:23 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Beeswax, was how to drill into resin without breaking bits


Group, my father just showed me the best trick of all time for avoiding breakage
of drill bits. Once your bit is in the vise, dip it in beeswax. Drilling then
goes 3x as fast, and I have yet to break a bit using this technique. Have tried
it with many sizes down to no. 80. Beeswax available from Caboose Hobbies, Micro
Mark, elsewhere.

Sorry if this has already been mentioned!

Best,
Adrian Hundhausen

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [CDN-frt-cars-n-ops] CN Fowler cars - X Braced frame doors

Armand Premo
 

Westerfield's #4254 CN stock car has the X braced door.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: al_brown03
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, September 08, 2010 5:47 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: [CDN-frt-cars-n-ops] CN Fowler cars - X Braced frame doors



A few published photos:

PGE 584, MM 4/86 p 54

PGE 575, 588, 501: RMC 11/91 p 102

-- hth --

-- Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Rob Kirkham" <rdkirkham@...> wrote:
>
> Hi Frank!
>
> It would be cool if you were able to dig up some photos of PGE stock cars.
> My collection is small. I only know of one good PGE photo of a fowler
> style stock car - it is in the Swain/Pinchbeck Powerpoint presentation on
> Fowler cars, and shows PGE 557 c.1949 - with an older style door (also seen
> on their pre-fowler style stock cars). It isn't the same as the X brace
> door Peter is referencing, although it has angled braces at top and bottom
> made from heavier looking wood pieces.
>
> Rob Kirkham
>
> --------------------------------------------------
> From: "Frank Valoczy" <destron@...>
> Sent: Tuesday, September 07, 2010 1:51 AM
> To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
> Subject: Re: [STMFC] [CDN-frt-cars-n-ops] CN Fowler cars - X Braced frame
> doors
>
> > I'm not at home right now so I can't check to verify, but I *think* the
> > Pacific Great Eastern's Fowler stock cars also had the X doors. I'll check
> > as soon as I'm able, but I would agree that TLT would do best by going
> > with the X-framed door.
> >
> > Frank Valoczy
> > Vancouver, BC
> >
> > Rob Kirkham wrote:
> >> Hi Peter,
> >> Looking through every photo of CNR stock cars I have, I find your
> >> descriptions are correct.
> >>
> >> Of the 5' door cars, all are of the Intercolonial and related fleets that
> >> were essentially CPR knock off designs, with unequally angled diagonal
> >> bracing. And all of the cars I have photos for had the X style door.
> >> These
> >> photos were all taken in later steam era/transition years.
> >>
> >> For the 6 foot door cars I have photos of (same vintage), all had the X
> >> style door.
> >>
> >> I can't imagine these were distributed geographically. I think TLT would
> >> be
> >> safe using this design for their CNR style stock cars.
> >>
> >> Rob Kirkham
> >>
> >> --------------------------------------------------
> >> From: "PBowers" <4everwaiting@...>
> >> Sent: Monday, September 06, 2010 10:22 PM
> >> To: <CanModelTrains@yahoogroups.com>; <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
> >> Subject: [STMFC] [CDN-frt-cars-n-ops] CN Fowler cars - X Braced frame
> >> doors
> >>
> >>> I have been discussing with TLT the possibility of having the 36 foot
> >>> Fowler stock cars released with the more common, especially in the
> >>> 50's, "X" framed door rather than the vertical slat door the first
> >>> runs of the model had. While CN did have that type door on some cars
> >>> it was not the typically seen door on the CN 36 foot stock cars..
> >>>
> >>> Doing a photo check the wood vertical slats on TLT CN cars as
> >>> modelled on the CN stock cars was rare by the fifties. It appears
> >>> the most prevalent use of the wood vertical slat doors were on the 5
> >>> foot wide cars. The six foot cars with vertical slat doors were rare
> >>> by the mid forties it appears,
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Doing a quick bit of history on the CN cars we find:
> >>>
> >>> CN rebuilt 5 foot door Intercolonial Ry box cars into wood slat door
> >>> equipped stock cars in 1923 that lasted up to the forties. These
> >>> cars had 4 brace ends In 1923 they also rebuilt 500 GT Fowler stock
> >>> cars These cars had 2 brace ends and wood doors. Like the other
> >>> cars they lasted into the forties at least.
> >>>
> >>> CN rebuilt a further 1500 former 5' door Intercolonial Ry and 6' door
> >>> ex GT cars between 1934 and 1939 Like the previous rebuilds, these
> >>> cars carried the 4 and 2 braces on their ends.
> >>>
> >>> In 1948 CN converted more ex 1913 built GT boxcars with steel roofs
> >>> Power hand brakes AB brakes and 5 braces on the car ends. These cars
> >>> were all equipped with X braces doors upon entering service. Photos
> >>> show that many were equipped with these newer doors by the mid 40's
> >>> and it appears they were appearing on cars by the early forties.
> >>>
> >>> Interestingly, I have not found a five foot wide door CN car with the
> >>> X frame door although a couple photos show existing cars in 1963 and
> >>> 1974. As well I have not come up with a clear picture to verify the
> >>> vertical wood slat doors on the 6 foot wide Fowler cars after the
> >>> very early forties.
> >>>
> >>> With this research taking shape fairly well, I am passing it on to
> >>> the Canadian Freight Car and Operations and CNLines-CNet/Steam Mavens
> >>> list to see what else we can flush out on these cars.
> >>>
> >>> As for numbers of cars there were about 876 5' foot wide door Fowler
> >>> cars on the books in 1953 and about 2100 6 foot door Fowler stock
> >>> cars comprising the CN fleet.
> >>>
> >>> These cars were used extensively in the west, Ontario and Quebec as
> >>> well as the Maritimes. As well they were used system wide for
> >>> hauling MOW supplies and could be seen hauling almost anything when a
> >>> car was needed and weatherproof conditions was not a necessity and as
> >>> long as the need for moving livestock was absent.
> >>>
> >>> It would be interesting to know if the 5 foot door cars were
> >>> specially assigned in any way. According to ORER records they were
> >>> equipped with a feeding trough. These were the only cars so
> >>> equipped. But why?
> >>>
> >>> As the X framed door was a minor repair/upgrade, there was little or
> >>> no upgrade to the car necessary. I had discussed with a resin
> >>> producer producing an insert that would require cutting out the
> >>> vertical slats of the full height slat door such as on the ONR
> >>> version and inserting the horizontal slat-X frame module.
> >>>
> >>> I know personally, there are a lot of persons who did not buy the
> >>> first CN Fowler cars because they knew the door was incorrect for
> >>> what they wanted. My bet is the X frame doors would be a big hit.
> >>>
> >>> Currently the info needed by TLT at this point is as
> >>> follows: Exactly how many of these cars (the X framed door Fowler
> >>> stock cars) saw service, time frame, in what regions (so potential
> >>> popularity) and from a manufacturing perspective, what changes or
> >>> differences between 'standard cars' and the 'X' braced door (what
> >>> would we have to change at the factory)? We are just trying to get an
> >>> idea, financially how feasible this change would be and if there is
> >>> enough interest. Any help or ideas would be welcomed.
> >>>
> >>> Peter Bowers
> >>> Discussion list on Canadian Freight Cars and their Operation
> >>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CDN-frt-cars-n-ops/
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> ------------------------------------
> >>>
> >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>
> >>
> >> ------------------------------------
> >>
> >> Yahoo! Groups Links
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> !DSPAM:1291,4c85d6e8177551514212557!
> >>
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ------------------------------------
> >
> > Yahoo! Groups Links
> >
> >
> >
> >
>






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Re: Beeswax, was how to drill into resin without breaking bits

VINCE PUGLIESE
 

Or use something like Bur Life which is available in stick, liquid or paste
form:

http://www.riogrande.com/MemberArea/SearchPage.aspx?page=GRID&category|cat_112|236=Burlife


Helps when using a razor or jeweller's saw as well.

.vp




________________________________
From: dnaldimodaroloc <dnaldimodaroloc@yahoo.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thu, September 9, 2010 10:41:23 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Beeswax, was how to drill into resin without breaking bits

 
Group, my father just showed me the best trick of all time for avoiding breakage
of drill bits. Once your bit is in the vise, dip it in beeswax. Drilling then
goes 3x as fast, and I have yet to break a bit using this technique. Have tried
it with many sizes down to no. 80. Beeswax available from Caboose Hobbies, Micro
Mark, elsewhere.

Sorry if this has already been mentioned!

Best,
Adrian Hundhausen




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Beeswax, was how to drill into resin without breaking bits

VINCE PUGLIESE
 

Or use something like Bur Life which is available in stick, liquid or paste
form:

http://www.riogrande.com/MemberArea/SearchPage.aspx?page=GRID&category|cat_112|236=Burlife


Helps when using a razor or jeweller's saw as well.

.vp




________________________________
From: dnaldimodaroloc <dnaldimodaroloc@yahoo.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thu, September 9, 2010 10:41:23 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Beeswax, was how to drill into resin without breaking bits

 
Group, my father just showed me the best trick of all time for avoiding breakage
of drill bits. Once your bit is in the vise, dip it in beeswax. Drilling then
goes 3x as fast, and I have yet to break a bit using this technique. Have tried
it with many sizes down to no. 80. Beeswax available from Caboose Hobbies, Micro
Mark, elsewhere.

Sorry if this has already been mentioned!

Best,
Adrian Hundhausen




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Discontinuance of Kadee #58 Semi-Scale Couplers

Armand Premo
 

Doc,That was Tim's remark.Mine merely reflected on the loss of the ability to take up slack in starting a train.To my knowledge no other coupler allows this prototypical movement.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: Denny Anspach
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, September 09, 2010 10:59 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Discontinuance of Kadee #58 Semi-Scale Couplers



Armand writes-

> Without the old #4 none of my brass steam would have working pilot couplers...

With taking anything away from this good Kadee discussion, I will comment that the Accurail Accumate Proto couplers can make excellent (excellent!) working locomotive pilot couplers, looking good while being fully insulated to boot.

Back to Kadee!

Denny

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Okoboji, Iowa








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Drilling plastic & resin

JP Barger
 

Guys:
After all the excellent useful emails sent by our knowledgable and
experienced drillers, there are some points not covered. Most of the resin
materials drill about the same (see below), provided the drill speed is high
enough to do the job. Drill speed before we developed thermoplastics ( the
materials which do not undergo a chemical, or compositional change when
injection molded) was inversely proportional to the drill diameter. The
smaller the drill, the higher the rpm's. But then, we learned that high
speeds and thermoplastics aren't compatible under normal continuous
drilling: they do what they are set up for; they melt. The answers are: use
the newest, sharpest drill you have, and don't drill continuously. Drill
intermittently using several little bites per hole. Don't slow the drill
speed; but spread out over time the heat generated by the drill. The extra
time involved allows the thermoplastic to cool down after each bite is
taken, or to go below its softening point, the temperature above which you
cannot be sure it's a solid. Remember: the sharpest, newest drill and a
controlled slower rate of progress into the workpiece.
Other considerations: there are a couple of different phenomena in
accidentally producing a melted distorted hole. First is a ball of plastic
melted onto the end of the drill, which if left alone and drilling is
continued, gradually makes a hole much larger than you had hoped for. Next,
if you don't have the workpiece 'nailed down'-or more carefully said-
clamped or secured, you may find the drill picking up the workpiece, pulling
the drill out at an angle. This makes a real mess: enlarged off-center
angled hole in softened or gooey plastic! At this point, the temptation is
to switch to a hobby that you're surer you can do well. The saving thing
that keeps you in model trains is the sheer investment you've already made,
not counting the hundreds or thousands or hours practicing your skills to
get to this point. BUT, there's always a way out of a mess. You can buy a
replacement part. Or, given just modest skills, you can recenter the
workpiece in the drill press, and prepare it for a round insert, using a rod
or or tube diameter that matches one of your drills. How about an example?
Let's say you didn't look carefully enough when you bought that AHM car with
the friction truck mounting pins, and that someone earlier badly buggered
one of the truck mounting holes. But as a firm beliver in Steinberg's
Corollary of Murphy's Rule, which is: 'Murphy's actually a great optimist',
you don't allow friction mounting for your trucks or couplers. A good answer
is use Evergreen 1/8" tube, clamp the car carefully (gently) in the drill
vise, and redrill the hole to match the tube. Now comes the valuable lesson
I learned trying to get the tube to stay mounted in the enlarged hole. This
little tubing gem isn't plain styrene, and some of the carbodies aren't,
either. So, after time at the asylum over the frustration from this problem,
I finally found out that the material or materials aren't effectively joined
by ordinary styrene glue. It takes one of the ABS type glues. It felt really
good to get out of the straitjacket!
One more point about the resin materials. When I said that the resins all
drill about the same, I knew that I owed an explanation about the original
resin at the beginning of Westerfield kits (#1100 to about #3500) Al
Westerfield had another of his genius ideas at the start of his business:
eliminate or at least reduce the amount of additional weight to be added to
the car to bring it up to the recommended running weight! Al's solution was
to incorporate a heavy powder int the resin casting material. But, after a
lot of broken and instantly dulled highspeed drills, many modelers gave up
on the early resin. It's the dark gray one and can be quite brittle, too.
But, if the modeler can get the castings cleaned up and drilled, the whole
car assembly makes a sufficiently strong item to handle and use on the
layout, and yes, it still will accept a little weight to help it stay on the
rails. Why am I going through all this? Because, these models are
underappreciated by many of us who haven't yet learned that drilling this
refractory material is as easy as 1-2-3! The answer is carbide circuit board
drills, which slice through this material as if it weren't there at all.
Drilling all resin & plastic materials in this hobby is so much easier with
an adequate small drill press, a drill vise and carbide drills! The drills
are easy to buy, too. You can use Drill Bit City, as has already been
suggested. Or, you can easily buy packages of 50 assorted size carbide
drills from the main hobby tool vendors who show up at shows like W.
Springfield, like Billy Carr. Both sources I have mentioned sell mostly
regrinds, which are used carbides with the tips reground with a diamond
tool. Drill breakage is minimized using a drill press with a stable platen,
a good square drill vise and careful handling. Another advantage is all the
smaller carbide drill bits employ standardized one-eighth inch diameter
shanks, which saves time and aggravaton in chucking. The fact that reground
drills have shorter active drill lenghths works to a modeler's advantage
because they don't break as fast. And finally, carbide drills are incredibly
sharp, cut like crazy and minimize heat production during drilling, giving
more latitude in drilling resin and plastic. By the way, resin does undergo
a chemical change in hardening; it normally has a softening point higher
than the standard thermoplastics we use, but is not immune from damage in
being overheated.
Happy, accurate, hole-making! JP


Re: What do you guys use to drill holes in plastic and Resin?

Brian Ehni <behni@...>
 

Sigh. Have to take a new deer stand to far Northern Minnesota the middle of
October. That and deer season will kill all my available vacation time. Next
year, though...

Thanks!
--

Brian P. Ehni




From: Bill Welch <fgexbill@tampabay.rr.com>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 09 Sep 2010 14:01:07 -0000
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: What do you guys use to drill holes in plastic and
Resin?






I have the same drill that Brian speaks of that I purchased from him at the
"Nashville Depot" about 15 years ago. I use a small variable speed power
pack to juice it.

One quirk I have experienced is that not all #79 drill bits will fit, so now
I usually take the drill with me when I need new drill bits to fit each one
to my drill. I have been pretty successful with minimizing breakage.

To maximize my drilling "efficiency" I try to work on two identical or
similar cars at a time, i.e. an 8k and a 10k tank car, two offset twin
hoppers, two Pratt trussed SS boxcars, etc.

I do have a couple of pin vices and use the little straight pins that come
with shirts to create a starter dimple.

Brian, since Naperville is earlier this year and hopefully before hunting
season, I hope to see you there this year!

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "dakkinder"
<dakkinder@...> wrote:

I have had some set backs with plastic and resin kits drilling holes for grabs
and such i either brake the bit or it gets broken off in the model.
Do you have any tips on how to do this?
I'm using a pin vise.

Doug Kinder


Bad news on the door step

Clark Propst
 

Just received the Sunshine flyers for new releases at Naperville. I was checking my freight car lists against the models to see what I was going to buy. I was pleased to see I can buy that weird doored D&RGW box car and the short NC&StL rebuild : - )

At the bottom back of the last paper is an Armour 1-2000 series reefer : - O

I have extensively kitbashed 10 Intermountain PFE Armour lettered reefers with Stan Rydarowicz's doors, ends and roofs. Had Allen Ferguson make me the needed decals that IM left off or put in the wrong spot. Replacing them would cost me $420 : - (

Good thing we're heading for NW Ontario in the morning for a week. It'll give me time to soak my head!
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa

93281 - 93300 of 186232