Date   

Re: Squadron Putty & Resin Kits

michaelashelley <mashelley@...>
 

I thin Squadron white putty with acetone (Cutex Nail Polish Remover, because that's what I have on hand.) It can be smoothed with a cotton swab dipped in acetone as well. However, I have not tried using it on resin.

Squadron white putty seems to have a finer grain than their green putty.

M.A.Shelley

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "behillman" <chris_hillman@...> wrote:

I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin kit parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very easily after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to use it on resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.

Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries very quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around easily. It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some more toluene, maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Re: Squadron Putty & Resin Kits

Bob Sterner
 

Testors sells a white putty in a tube that is thinner and easier to work with than Squadron.

Bob Sterner

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Lucas" <stevelucas3@...> wrote:

The red Bondo putty works well for me. It can be cut with Testor's solvent. I also brush a little bit of solvent into the top of the tube when closing it up, or else it'll dry out a bit.

Gunze Sangyo "Mr. Surfacer" I can also reccommend, having used it on many resin kits. Including a resin coach kit that I have become very anal retentive about the finish on. This stuff, when painted on, shows bad joints and flaws immediately. It's nice to find them before painting a model.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Rob & Bev Manley" <robev1630@> wrote:

Paul,
I agree with the red Bondo spot putty.It has worked well and I have used it for years with no ill results.

Rob Manley

----- Original Message -----
From: Paul Hillman
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 2:44 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits



Jack, and all,

Bondo "Glazing & Spot Putty" might be a better material. I have some from working on my vehicle paint jobs I'm doing also. I think it has a longer work-time and sticks to about anything which is cleaned well. Nice call!

The holes I'm having to fill are, yes, mistakes I made in drilling some counter-sunk holes for screws in the wrong places, to make a car-floor removable. They're like 1/16" dia. in 1/16" material and counter-sunk. There are also some casting-flaws in the car body that need filling & filing.

Let's see how the old "Bondo trick" comes through.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----
From: Jack Burgess<mailto:jack@>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 2:02 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits

<I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin
<kit parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very
<easily after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to
<use it on resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.
<
<Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries
<very quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around
<easily. It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some
<more toluene, maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?
<
<Thanks, Paul Hillman

I've been using Bondo Glazing & Spot Putty for styrene and possibly resin
too. I know I haven't problems using is on styrene and don't recall any
problems with resin. It is available at auto parts stores.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Archer rivets

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Ned Carey wrote:
2) I found it difficult to handle the full 1" long strip of rivets. I would up putting them on in strips of 2 to 4 and lining them up. This worked fine. Tony Thompson mentioned in an earlier e-mail that he got the hang of working with the long strips. Any tips Tony?
The strips have a kind of stiffness that you wouldn't have with a same-size piece of regular decal. I just handled them accordingly. I think the main thing I tried to do was to get them close to the right position on the model right from the start. My feeling was that they are entirely workable.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Archer rivets

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

For making a long narrow strip, a rivet punch IMHO works very well. I wanted such a strip for the bottom of a streamlined resin kit coach side. I punched a row of rivets in .005" thick styrene about 1/2" wide, CA'ing it to the bottom of the side after first attaching it with Testor's solvent. More CA filled the joint between side and rivet strip, with Mr. Surfacer painted into the joint for good measure. I then trimmed the rivet strip to conform with car side, using progressively finer grades of sandpaper to 1500-grit. Result--an invisible joint between rivet strip and car side.

It's easier to keep a straight piece of 1/2" wide styrene with rivets punched in it straight, than it is to keep a long decal strip straight. And I get to pull out my hair when my son does something annoying rather than pulling it out while decalling.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Ned Carey" <nedspam@...> wrote:

In my "what on your bench" response I mentioned a Shay I was working on. I had the first opportunity to use Archer rivets. I needed about a one inch long row of rivets on about a .050" wide strip of brass.


My thoughts:
1) Firstly I was disappointed in the shape of the rivets. They seemed to be an irregular oval shape not round. Painted and in use I don't think it is as big a concern as I thought when I saw the package. Is this irregular shape common for Archer?

2) I found it difficult to handle the full 1" long strip of rivets. I would up putting them on in strips of 2 to 4 and lining them up. This worked fine. Tony Thompson mentioned in an earlier e-mail that he got the hang of working with the long strips. Any tips Tony?

3) I didn't see anyone else mention a tip in the instructions. Brush a little Future acrylic floor polish (essentially clear acrylic paint) and apply the decals while the Future is still wet to help adhesion. I did this on bare brass and it worked fine. - In fact I needed to scrape off a couple that were in poor alignment. This was done before any overcoat on the decals. It took some effort to scrape them off. They were not delicate at all.

I wouldn't hesitate to use them again. I can see this could be another significant advance in modeling technology. Builders plates, trust plates, hinges, patch panels and many other details could be done this way.

Ned Carey



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Squadron Putty & Resin Kits

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

The red Bondo putty works well for me. It can be cut with Testor's solvent. I also brush a little bit of solvent into the top of the tube when closing it up, or else it'll dry out a bit.

Gunze Sangyo "Mr. Surfacer" I can also reccommend, having used it on many resin kits. Including a resin coach kit that I have become very anal retentive about the finish on. This stuff, when painted on, shows bad joints and flaws immediately. It's nice to find them before painting a model.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Rob & Bev Manley" <robev1630@...> wrote:

Paul,
I agree with the red Bondo spot putty.It has worked well and I have used it for years with no ill results.

Rob Manley

----- Original Message -----
From: Paul Hillman
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 2:44 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits



Jack, and all,

Bondo "Glazing & Spot Putty" might be a better material. I have some from working on my vehicle paint jobs I'm doing also. I think it has a longer work-time and sticks to about anything which is cleaned well. Nice call!

The holes I'm having to fill are, yes, mistakes I made in drilling some counter-sunk holes for screws in the wrong places, to make a car-floor removable. They're like 1/16" dia. in 1/16" material and counter-sunk. There are also some casting-flaws in the car body that need filling & filing.

Let's see how the old "Bondo trick" comes through.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----
From: Jack Burgess<mailto:jack@...>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 2:02 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits

<I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin
<kit parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very
<easily after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to
<use it on resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.
<
<Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries
<very quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around
<easily. It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some
<more toluene, maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?
<
<Thanks, Paul Hillman

I've been using Bondo Glazing & Spot Putty for styrene and possibly resin
too. I know I haven't problems using is on styrene and don't recall any
problems with resin. It is available at auto parts stores.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Archer rivets

Ned Carey <nedspam@...>
 

In my "what on your bench" response I mentioned a Shay I was working on. I had the first opportunity to use Archer rivets. I needed about a one inch long row of rivets on about a .050" wide strip of brass.


My thoughts:
1) Firstly I was disappointed in the shape of the rivets. They seemed to be an irregular oval shape not round. Painted and in use I don't think it is as big a concern as I thought when I saw the package. Is this irregular shape common for Archer?

2) I found it difficult to handle the full 1" long strip of rivets. I would up putting them on in strips of 2 to 4 and lining them up. This worked fine. Tony Thompson mentioned in an earlier e-mail that he got the hang of working with the long strips. Any tips Tony?

3) I didn't see anyone else mention a tip in the instructions. Brush a little Future acrylic floor polish (essentially clear acrylic paint) and apply the decals while the Future is still wet to help adhesion. I did this on bare brass and it worked fine. - In fact I needed to scrape off a couple that were in poor alignment. This was done before any overcoat on the decals. It took some effort to scrape them off. They were not delicate at all.

I wouldn't hesitate to use them again. I can see this could be another significant advance in modeling technology. Builders plates, trust plates, hinges, patch panels and many other details could be done this way.

Ned Carey


Re: What's on your work bench?

Ned Carey <nedspam@...>
 

Currently My freight car projects are on temporary hold

Precision Scale 6,000 gal. Van Dyke tank car.
This kit is not well known. Many people do not know this kit comes in standard gauge as well as narow gauge. I would recomend the kit to anyone who wants a unique tank car. While certinly not common by the end of the steam era it adds aditional variety top our tank car fleets in both style and size. I recomend you get the version with brass detail parts and get a copy of Richard Hendricksons article on these cars in the December 1995 Railroad Model Craftsman.

Speedwitch Media's 8,000 gal. Presed steel tank car.
I highly recomend this kit. It is a kitbash in a box with excellent instructions and pictures. It is fun to build. Ted is to be commended for the great in progress photos that leave little question how to proceed.

Sunshine WM boxcars
I sure these will look great when I am done but dealing with the running boards and corner grabs has not been fun.

What is currently progressing is two Shay engines. A four truck shay only needs paint at this point.

Bill Welch's question about the sherline mills got me motivated to work on my second shay. I am using the mill to cut to shape, cut windows and cut fold lines for a scratchbuilt cab.

Ned Carey


Re: Squadron Putty & Resin Kits

Armand Premo
 

FWIW I have used Squadron green and white putty as well as Ace 5 minute epoxy for years without a problem .The two ton epoxy is also great if you are not in a hurry.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: Andy Carlson
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 7:14 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits



I have been a big fan of Ace Hardware's "2-Ton" epoxy, a long cure rate 50/50
epoxy. It seems to have a finished harness which mimics the styrene base
material well, which when sanding/filing doesn't recess, saving having to do a
2nd or more additional coats. Drills, taps and reinforces well on styrene. With
a hole to fill, by placing a taut piece of clear Scotch Tape bridging the gap, a
back-fill of epoxy gives a repair which mostly doesn't even require any sanding.

I don't like 5-minute epoxy, it should be left behind at your store,
unpurchased.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

________________________________
From: Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@verizon.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sun, August 29, 2010 1:40:30 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits

To thin or keep soft Squadron and other similar putties, use Testor's Liquid
Cement. The thinner it is, the more it shrinks, though.

I agree with the others that resin is best filled with thick (gap-flling)
superglue. Accellerator helps the process. You must sand it soon after it
dries, however, because overnight it will become harder than the resin (bad
for sanding).

Large areas (1/8 inch diameter or more) are best filled with some epoxy
putty. The hardware store stuff is fine.

For pinholes, use a Gunze Sangyo product, "Mr. Surfacer 500". It is like a
very thick paint but dries hard and wet sands easily.

A key to puttying models: Spend your time dry-fitting and trimming the
pices before gluing them rather than sanding filler afterwards. Also, only
use the minimum amount of filler. Minimum filler addition = minimum filler
removal = minimum detail lost.

Don't bother with a gray primer (or any primer at all) - it just hides
detail. If you want to check for defects, paint it your final color.
Inspect, sand, fill, and sand as needed, then wash it clean and paint the
final coats. It's always worked as good as anything else for me.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: behillman

I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin kit
parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very easily
after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to use it on
resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.

Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries very
quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around easily.
It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some more toluene,
maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?








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Re: Squadron Putty & Resin Kits

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

I was talking about putty, not liquid cement.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Andy Carlson

I don't like 5-minute epoxy, it should be left behind at your store, unpurchased.


Squadron Putty & Resin Kits

Andy Carlson
 

I have been a big fan of Ace Hardware's "2-Ton" epoxy, a long cure rate 50/50
epoxy. It seems to have a finished harness which mimics the styrene base
material well, which when sanding/filing doesn't recess, saving having to do a
2nd or more additional coats. Drills, taps and reinforces well on styrene. With
a hole to fill, by placing a taut piece of clear Scotch Tape bridging the gap, a
back-fill of epoxy gives a repair which mostly doesn't even require any sanding.


I don't like 5-minute epoxy, it should be left behind at your store,
unpurchased.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA





________________________________
From: Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@verizon.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sun, August 29, 2010 1:40:30 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits


To thin or keep soft Squadron and other similar putties, use Testor's Liquid
Cement. The thinner it is, the more it shrinks, though.

I agree with the others that resin is best filled with thick (gap-flling)
superglue. Accellerator helps the process. You must sand it soon after it
dries, however, because overnight it will become harder than the resin (bad
for sanding).

Large areas (1/8 inch diameter or more) are best filled with some epoxy
putty. The hardware store stuff is fine.

For pinholes, use a Gunze Sangyo product, "Mr. Surfacer 500". It is like a
very thick paint but dries hard and wet sands easily.

A key to puttying models: Spend your time dry-fitting and trimming the
pices before gluing them rather than sanding filler afterwards. Also, only
use the minimum amount of filler. Minimum filler addition = minimum filler
removal = minimum detail lost.

Don't bother with a gray primer (or any primer at all) - it just hides
detail. If you want to check for defects, paint it your final color.
Inspect, sand, fill, and sand as needed, then wash it clean and paint the
final coats. It's always worked as good as anything else for me.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: behillman

I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin kit
parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very easily
after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to use it on
resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.

Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries very
quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around easily.
It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some more toluene,
maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Squadron Putty & Resin Kits

Rob & Bev Manley
 

Paul,
I agree with the red Bondo spot putty.It has worked well and I have used it for years with no ill results.

Rob Manley

----- Original Message -----
From: Paul Hillman
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 2:44 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits



Jack, and all,

Bondo "Glazing & Spot Putty" might be a better material. I have some from working on my vehicle paint jobs I'm doing also. I think it has a longer work-time and sticks to about anything which is cleaned well. Nice call!

The holes I'm having to fill are, yes, mistakes I made in drilling some counter-sunk holes for screws in the wrong places, to make a car-floor removable. They're like 1/16" dia. in 1/16" material and counter-sunk. There are also some casting-flaws in the car body that need filling & filing.

Let's see how the old "Bondo trick" comes through.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----
From: Jack Burgess<mailto:jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 2:02 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits

<I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin
<kit parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very
<easily after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to
<use it on resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.
<
<Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries
<very quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around
<easily. It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some
<more toluene, maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?
<
<Thanks, Paul Hillman

I've been using Bondo Glazing & Spot Putty for styrene and possibly resin
too. I know I haven't problems using is on styrene and don't recall any
problems with resin. It is available at auto parts stores.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Painting black - color samples uploaded

Ned Carey <nedspam@...>
 

Some time ago I started a thread about colors to use to represent black. Vince Pugliese wrote "Please report on your findings..."

I have uploaded to the photos section a scan of several acrylic color samples.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/20463649/pic/2061661213/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=1&count=20&dir=asc
If the link doesn't work there is usually a link at the bottom to our group or directly to new photos. The photo is in Ned Carey's models folder.

To the far right is a thin stripe that is unlabeled; that is poly scale engine black. The codes underneath each color sample are from Photoshop elements to show the relative break down of the red, green, blue components.

Nato Black seems to have a slight green tint. This is very visible with the first light overpass of the airbrush. The green tint seems to disappear as the paint goes on thicker. Tarnished Black seems to have a tint to it but it seems to vary based on the lighting.

The variation in color you see in the Testors Euro Gray and the Poly Scale Tarnished black are grossly exaggerated from what you actually see looking at the samples. I believe this is just sensitivity of the scanner.

I have come to the conclusion that Poly Scale Tarnished black or Testors Panzer Schwarzgrau are the best choices for tank cars, other black freight cars and steam engines. I will probably stick mainly with tarnished black. I will sometimes use Panzer Schwarzgrau by itself or an overspray over tarnished black to give variation to my models. I use thinned Grimy Black over these to represent spilled lading on tank cars and soot on engines.

Probably the worst thing you want to do is paint your engines with "Engine Black" This is too dark and will hide the details. Look at black and white photos. Most engines, tank cars and hoppers appear to be pretty light gray in bright sunlight.

Ned Carey


SP Flat Car Appliances

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

I have several Red Caboose Southern Pacific F-70-7 flat cars from the initial run. These are finished cars with the separate wood deck.
Aside from the right angled grab irons which were installed the wrong way this is an excellent model. The cars came with four separate
"cleats" for use on the deck.I have not seen any SP flat car photos with these cleats. I would appreciate any information including
placement on these items.

Thanks in advance for any help.

Bill Pardie


Re: Squadron Putty & Resin Kits

Frank Valoczy <destron@...>
 

The Squadron putty I've only had any success with using it on styrene, and
then only by thinning it some with Testors liquid. But more recently I
discovered the Tamiya putty, which is considerably thinner than the
Squadron stuff, so much easier to work with; I'm satisfied with the
results I get with the Tamiya putty for the larger gaps/holes. Also, I
also rather like Mr. Surfacer for smaller surface nicks/gapes/etc that
need filling.

I've never seen these at any shop carrying railway hobby products - I get
both at a place specialising in armour and aircraft kits.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

----- Original Message -----
From: Jack Burgess<mailto:jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 2:02 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits



<I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C
resin
<kit parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very
<easily after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to
<use it on resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.
<
<Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries
<very quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around
<easily. It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some
<more toluene, maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?
<
<Thanks, Paul Hillman

I've been using Bondo Glazing & Spot Putty for styrene and possibly
resin
too. I know I haven't problems using is on styrene and don't recall any
problems with resin. It is available at auto parts stores.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com









------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




!DSPAM:1291,4c7ab8a1177555656516607!


Re: Reefers With End Doors?

Dave Lawler
 

I guess that kinda' proves the "old saw" that there's a prototype for anything if you look hard enough. However, it would seem to only make sense with overhead bunker reefers like the Canadian 8 hatcher's.
Best regards,
Dave Lawler


Re: Squadron Putty & Resin Kits

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

To thin or keep soft Squadron and other similar putties, use Testor's Liquid Cement. The thinner it is, the more it shrinks, though.

I agree with the others that resin is best filled with thick (gap-flling) superglue. Accellerator helps the process. You must sand it soon after it dries, however, because overnight it will become harder than the resin (bad for sanding).

Large areas (1/8 inch diameter or more) are best filled with some epoxy putty. The hardware store stuff is fine.

For pinholes, use a Gunze Sangyo product, "Mr. Surfacer 500". It is like a very thick paint but dries hard and wet sands easily.

A key to puttying models: Spend your time dry-fitting and trimming the pices before gluing them rather than sanding filler afterwards. Also, only use the minimum amount of filler. Minimum filler addition = minimum filler removal = minimum detail lost.

Don't bother with a gray primer (or any primer at all) - it just hides detail. If you want to check for defects, paint it your final color. Inspect, sand, fill, and sand as needed, then wash it clean and paint the final coats. It's always worked as good as anything else for me.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: behillman

I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin kit parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very easily after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to use it on resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.

Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries very quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around easily. It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some more toluene, maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?


Re: Squadron Putty & Resin Kits

Paul Hillman
 

Jack, and all,

Bondo "Glazing & Spot Putty" might be a better material. I have some from working on my vehicle paint jobs I'm doing also. I think it has a longer work-time and sticks to about anything which is cleaned well. Nice call!

The holes I'm having to fill are, yes, mistakes I made in drilling some counter-sunk holes for screws in the wrong places, to make a car-floor removable. They're like 1/16" dia. in 1/16" material and counter-sunk. There are also some casting-flaws in the car body that need filling & filing.

Let's see how the old "Bondo trick" comes through.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----
From: Jack Burgess<mailto:jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 2:02 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Squadron Putty & Resin Kits



<I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin
<kit parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very
<easily after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to
<use it on resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.
<
<Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries
<very quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around
<easily. It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some
<more toluene, maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?
<
<Thanks, Paul Hillman

I've been using Bondo Glazing & Spot Putty for styrene and possibly resin
too. I know I haven't problems using is on styrene and don't recall any
problems with resin. It is available at auto parts stores.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Re: Rivet size for Sunshine SAL B7 round top box car roof

Bill McCoy
 

John and Frank,

Thanks. That's just what I needed.

Bill McCoy
Jax

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, FRANK PEACOCK <frank3112@...> wrote:


Bill, I would go with the 5/8 rivets. The typical side rivets (rivet heads of course) are about 11/16 and 5/8 is close to that. Of course it might be a good plan to match the size on the kit, which are probably oversize. FHP (Frank H. Peacock)

To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
From: wpmccoy@...
Date: Sun, 29 Aug 2010 18:35:15 +0000
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Rivet size for Sunshine SAL B7 round top box car roof




























Prototype rivet size was the question. I worded it badly. Thanks.



Bill McCoy



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@> wrote:

Bill, surely you can do simple arithmetic? -- divide 5/8 by 87.1 and
7/8 by 87.1. You'll find the Archer rivets are less than 1/2 the size
of the Tichy rivets, so either size is going to look better. Which one
is exactly right for your prototype can only be known from a blueprint
or other primary source.
Tim O'Connor
I'm building my Sunshine SAL B7 round roof box car. The roof casting ends were concave and had to be sanded square with loss of the roof end rivet detail. I tried Tichy 8017 .020" rivets but I can't get the spacing exactly even. Archer lists 2 size of rivets, 5/8" and 7/8". Which is right for the rivets that attach the car roof to the car ends and sides?
Thanks.
Bill McCoy
Jax, FL




















Re: Squadron Putty & Resin Kits

Bill Welch
 

Usually when I have to repair a hole, it is because of a mistake I have made either measuring or drilling or both. I like using styrene rod for these kinds of situations. Once I have determined what size rod need, which sometimes means enlarging the hole slightly, I flood it with Testors liquid on the surface and the underside and may do this several times, melting the styrene into hole. Sometime I will apply some ACC on the reverse side and will then use a sharp chisel blade to trim the rod on the visible side. Generally the repair is invisible.

BTW, in a packet of rod, I have noticed there is some variation in the size of the rod, so trying a few different piece of rod will likely yield a fit when you get close. Also, the rod is not always the same end to end.

This can be done almost more quickly than it takes time to talk about.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "behillman" <chris_hillman@...> wrote:

I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin kit parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very easily after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to use it on resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.

Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries very quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around easily. It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some more toluene, maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Re: Squadron Putty & Resin Kits

Tim O'Connor
 

Paul, if the holes are small, I use thin CA. It's easy to work with,
easy to sop up any excess and it dries hard and smooth. I sometimes use
it as a "wash" over top of putty since putty doesn't have a perfectly
smooth finish. For big holes, I'd use a base layer of slow drying epoxy
and then backfill with CA.

Tim O'Connor

I tried filling some holes, etc. with "Squadron Putty" on some F&C resin kit parts and it didn't stick good at all; broke out of the holes very easily after a several day drying time. Any one with ideas about how to use it on resin? Apparently the two don't like to adhere well.

Also, when trying to apply small amounts of "Squadron Putty" it dries very quickly on the surface and doesn't allow you to spread it around easily. It's base is "Toluene". Anyone try to, say, mix it with some more toluene, maybe, or another solvent, to extend it's work-ability?

Thanks, Paul Hillman

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