Date   

Re: Non-conductance of Neolube {WAS: Branchline reefer rolling resistance]

bob_karig <karig@...>
 

I'd err in the favor of Mal's concern. I've used Neolube and managed to run it across wheel insulation. While it wasn't enough to cause a dead short, I could detect a slight current running across it.

Bob Karig


Re: Branchline reefer rolling resistance

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

While I don't think Neolube is good for trucks it is very good for Kadee type couplers that are not plastic. Neolube on the brass spring and drawbar of the coupler works (let it dry completely). It also good on the knuckle face especially if you file or polish them. Again I only use it on metal parts not plastic or metal to plastic contact.

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Branchline reefer rolling resistance

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Denny Anspach wrote:
Although lubing does not generally hinder rollability, my experience and recordable data is that lubing axle ends with "whatever" lubricant is rarely of any measurable benefit in improving rollability, excepting the occasional situation where there is adverse metal/metal contact.

Lubing also eliminates the occasional mysterious "squeaky" wheels.
This is exactly my experience too, though I don't do the comprehensive rollability tests that Denny does.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: INFORMATION ON USRA GONDOLAS

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:
CAN ANYONE DIRECT ME TO A GOOD DETAIL PHOTO OF THE RATCHET TYPE OF BRAKE STAFF USED ON SOME USRA COMPOSIT GONDOLAS?
Bill, please stop SHOUTING by using all caps.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


HO Decals for Southeastern Fallen Flags

Riley K <riley050748@...>
 

Bob McCarthy at the Supply Depot is in the process of producing decals for notable fallen roads, like the ACL, C&WC, GA Road, CN&L, C of Ga and others. If interested please go to www.thesupplycar.net to see the list or to contact him.


INFORMATION ON USRA GONDOLAS

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

CAN ANYONE DIRECT ME TO A GOOD DETAIL PHOTO OF THE RATCHET TYPE OF BRAKE STAFF USED ON SOME USRA COMPOSIT GONDOLAS?

THANKS IN ADVANCE.

BILL PARDIE


Re: Branchline reefer rolling resistance

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Although lubing does not generally hinder rollability, my experience and recordable data is that lubing axle ends with "whatever" lubricant is rarely of any measurable benefit in improving rollability, excepting the occasional situation where there is adverse metal/metal contact.

Lubing also eliminates the occasional mysterious "squeaky" wheels.

As a result of this, I stopped oiling or lubing axle ends some years ago- except in specific situations- and I do not miss it.

Denny

Denny
Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento


Re: Non-conductance of Neolube {WAS: Branchline reefer rolling resistance]

Andy Sperandeo <asperandeo@...>
 

My experience with Neolube is exactly the opposite of Mal Houck's. I routinely use it to paint PC-tie switch rods on my handbuilt turnouts, and it never causes a short circuit in that application. Before first doing this I tested for conductivity by painting Neolube across the gap I'd cut in the foil surface of a PC tie. Clipping VOM leads to each end of the PC tie after the Neolube dried, I read "infinite" resistance, or an open circuit. I've since used Neolube on steam locomotive drivers and other wheelsets and never had any problem with it bridging the insulation. I'll add that I bought this Neolube from P-B-L, so I can't vouch for any other version of the product.

So long,

Andy

Andy Sperandeo
Executive Editor
Model Railroader magazine
asperandeo@mrmag.com
262-796-8776, ext. 461
FAX 262-796-1142


Re: Painting black - was Painting X-3 deck

VINCE PUGLIESE
 

You may want to try Gunze Sangyo H-77 Flat Tire Black.

.vp



________________________________
From: Ned Carey <nedspam@comcast.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wed, January 20, 2010 12:07:47 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Painting black - was Painting X-3 deck


Bruce Smith Wrote:
paint the whole car a lightened black (steam power black, cockpit
interior black, etc) and then to weather it with tarnished black.

Bruce and others,

Bruce turned me on to tarnished black years ago. But I am thinking it is just a shade darker than I would like. Is there a pre-mixed "black" that is a little lighter? I am open to any of the acrylics; Poly Scale, Testors Model Master etc.

I am not familiar with cockpit interior black or Rubber which Greg Martin uses. Are these darker or lighter than tarnished black (or grimy black which is very close)?

Thank you,

Ned Carey

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Painting black - was Painting X-3 deck

Brian Carlson
 

PWIW I like Poly Scale Nato Tri Color Black. How it compares to the others, I have no idea, it's not as black as Poly Scale Black.
Brian Carlson

--- On Wed, 1/20/10, Bruce Smith <smithbf@auburn.edu> wrote:


From: Bruce Smith <smithbf@auburn.edu>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Painting black - was Painting X-3 deck
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, January 20, 2010, 7:41 AM


 



"Ned Carey" <nedspam@comcast. net> 01/19/10 11:15 PM >>>
Bruce turned me on to tarnished black years ago. But I am thinking it is
just a shade darker than I would like. Is there a pre-mixed "black" that
is a little lighter? I am open to any of the acrylics; Poly Scale,
Testors Model Master etc.

I am not familiar with cockpit interior black or Rubber which Greg
Martin uses. Are these darker or lighter than tarnished black (or grimy
black which is very close)?

Ned,

Cockpit interior (model master) is very similar to steam loco black
(poly scale) in that both are good for "new" black paint but aren't
absolutely black, allowing details to be seen. I make my own match for
rubber with a 50:50 mix of one of those with tarnished black, so no, I
would see rubber as darker than tarnished black.

Elden's comment about the greeninsh caste to some of these is
interesting in that I think that poly scale grimy black has lost this
and is now almost identical to tarnished black. I once had an "old
timer" tell me that he painted his PRR steamers "grimy black". "Why
that WRONG", said I, the know-it-all neophyte, "They must be DGLE".
Well, the old formula was perfect for weathered PRR steam, with just a
hint of green ;^) I like to exploit the obvious greenish tint of some
of these for the spills on the sides of cars, especially poly scale oily
black. That caste seems to catch the nuance of wet liquid reflecting
surrounding colors, including the sky.

As for your need for an even lighter black... time to start mixing
paints <G>!

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: Painting black - was Painting X-3 deck

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Guys;

I agree that most, if not all, "off" blacks have a hint of green, but there
are greens (Brunswick Green), and then there are greeeeens (Kelly Green). I
agree Grimy Black looks much better on PRR steam, or tank cars, than some of
the others, but to my eye (very subjective), the green in other off-blacks is
the wrong green, if you take my meaning. Why Grimy Black looks better to me,
is beyond my ability to articulate; I just like it.

I also agree that Oily Black does really well for oil spills, but you guys
need to tell me why; is it bluish?

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bruce
Smith
Sent: Wednesday, January 20, 2010 7:41 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Painting black - was Painting X-3 deck



"Ned Carey" <nedspam@comcast.net <mailto:nedspam%40comcast.net> >
01/19/10 11:15 PM >>>
Bruce turned me on to tarnished black years ago. But I am thinking it is just
a shade darker than I would like. Is there a pre-mixed "black" that is a
little lighter? I am open to any of the acrylics; Poly Scale, Testors Model
Master etc.

I am not familiar with cockpit interior black or Rubber which Greg Martin
uses. Are these darker or lighter than tarnished black (or grimy black which
is very close)?

Ned,

Cockpit interior (model master) is very similar to steam loco black (poly
scale) in that both are good for "new" black paint but aren't absolutely
black, allowing details to be seen. I make my own match for rubber with a
50:50 mix of one of those with tarnished black, so no, I would see rubber as
darker than tarnished black.

Elden's comment about the greeninsh caste to some of these is interesting in
that I think that poly scale grimy black has lost this and is now almost
identical to tarnished black. I once had an "old timer" tell me that he
painted his PRR steamers "grimy black". "Why that WRONG", said I, the
know-it-all neophyte, "They must be DGLE".
Well, the old formula was perfect for weathered PRR steam, with just a hint
of green ;^) I like to exploit the obvious greenish tint of some of these for
the spills on the sides of cars, especially poly scale oily black. That caste
seems to catch the nuance of wet liquid reflecting surrounding colors,
including the sky.

As for your need for an even lighter black... time to start mixing paints
<G>!

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: Painting black - was Painting X-3 deck

Bruce Smith
 

"Ned Carey" <nedspam@comcast.net> 01/19/10 11:15 PM >>>
Bruce turned me on to tarnished black years ago. But I am thinking it is
just a shade darker than I would like. Is there a pre-mixed "black" that
is a little lighter? I am open to any of the acrylics; Poly Scale,
Testors Model Master etc.

I am not familiar with cockpit interior black or Rubber which Greg
Martin uses. Are these darker or lighter than tarnished black (or grimy
black which is very close)?

Ned,

Cockpit interior (model master) is very similar to steam loco black
(poly scale) in that both are good for "new" black paint but aren't
absolutely black, allowing details to be seen. I make my own match for
rubber with a 50:50 mix of one of those with tarnished black, so no, I
would see rubber as darker than tarnished black.

Elden's comment about the greeninsh caste to some of these is
interesting in that I think that poly scale grimy black has lost this
and is now almost identical to tarnished black. I once had an "old
timer" tell me that he painted his PRR steamers "grimy black". "Why
that WRONG", said I, the know-it-all neophyte, "They must be DGLE".
Well, the old formula was perfect for weathered PRR steam, with just a
hint of green ;^) I like to exploit the obvious greenish tint of some
of these for the spills on the sides of cars, especially poly scale oily
black. That caste seems to catch the nuance of wet liquid reflecting
surrounding colors, including the sky.

As for your need for an even lighter black... time to start mixing
paints <G>!

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: Painting black - was Painting X-3 deck

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Ned;

Floquil Grimy Black looks to my eye very much like the sun-bleached "black"
of my youth. If I find it looks too grey, I add a bit of Engine Black to
suit. All of the acrylic "off-blacks", in my opinion, have undertones of
green or something I just don't appreciate. Rubber is very nice for dark
rust, but is definitely brown, to my eye. Rubber is very nice for adding
depth and complexity to details, or in making panels look different from
their neighbors.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ned
Carey
Sent: Wednesday, January 20, 2010 12:08 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Painting black - was Painting X-3 deck



Bruce Smith Wrote:
paint the whole car a lightened black (steam power black, cockpit
interior black, etc) and then to weather it with tarnished black.

Bruce and others,

Bruce turned me on to tarnished black years ago. But I am thinking it is just
a shade darker than I would like. Is there a pre-mixed "black" that is a
little lighter? I am open to any of the acrylics; Poly Scale, Testors Model
Master etc.

I am not familiar with cockpit interior black or Rubber which Greg Martin
uses. Are these darker or lighter than tarnished black (or grimy black which
is very close)?

Thank you,

Ned Carey

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Branchline reefer rolling resistance

Malcolm H. Houck
 

Neolube is great stuff. I've painted locomotive wheels with it. But you can
pay less than P-B-L
wants for it. Look around.

SGL

Careful here......the Neolube contains graphite as
it's lubricating medium. On insulated drivers it can
"bridge" the insulation band and cause them to then
be conductive. . . with the corresponding short across
the driver set......! Don't ask how I know this......!

Mal Houck


Painting black - was Painting X-3 deck

Ned Carey <nedspam@...>
 

Bruce Smith Wrote:
paint the whole car a lightened black (steam power black, cockpit
interior black, etc) and then to weather it with tarnished black.

Bruce and others,

Bruce turned me on to tarnished black years ago. But I am thinking it is just a shade darker than I would like. Is there a pre-mixed "black" that is a little lighter? I am open to any of the acrylics; Poly Scale, Testors Model Master etc.

I am not familiar with cockpit interior black or Rubber which Greg Martin uses. Are these darker or lighter than tarnished black (or grimy black which is very close)?

Thank you,

Ned Carey


Re: Branchline reefer rolling resistance

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

But you can pay less than P-B-L
wants for it. Look around.<
Some time ago I did some extensive searching for this stuff. Thirty years ago I had a spray can of it but the only use appear to be the AEC. You can find a site (at least then I did) but a 55 gal drum was a little excessive for me. I would like to know of any other place I can get it. On the net would be best.

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Branchline reefer rolling resistance

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Schuyler Larrabee

Neolube is great stuff. I've painted locomotive wheels with it. But you can pay less than P-B-L
wants for it. Look around.

KL> We use Neolube in Naval nuclear plants. It's merely graphite dispersed within isopropanol. I would argue about it's greatness as a lubricant, however . . .

KL


AIR HOSES AND BRACKETS

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

JOHN:

I WILL BE MAKING UP SOME AIR HOSE AND BRACKET ASSEMBLIES FOR SOME
CURRENT PROJECTS. RATHER THEN WAIT UNTIL MY PHOTOGRAPHIC SKILLS
IMPROVE IF YOU SEN ME YOUR MAILING ADDRESS
I'LL SEND SOME ALONG.

BILL PARDIE

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.


Re: Steam Era Freight Cars web site

Schuyler Larrabee
 

My experience was the same as Brian's. I mean, the girl's cute, but she's no PS-1!

SGL

Brian,
I just tried it and it's there!

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS




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8th Annual NE Proto Meet -- heads up and call for presenters

Dave Owens
 

Greetings all:

The 2010 New England/Northeast Prototype Modelers Meet will soon be
upon us. This year's meet is Friday and Saturday, June 4 and 5, at the
Canton Community Center in Collinsville, Connecticut. (We're always
the weekend after Memorial Day.) Layout open houses are scheduled for
Sunday, June 6.

We've been the beneficiaries in past years of great clinics from
top-notch presenters. We're always open to suggestions and new ideas
to make the meet better and welcome any suggestions for presenters and
clinic topics.

A key part of the meet is the model display, and we again have a large
room set aside for models. All models, finished and in-process, are
welcome.

We also have several manufacturers and vendors attending, including
Bob's Photo, Funaro & Camerlengo, Rapido, Branchline, Sheepscot Scale,
Stella Scale Models, Speedwitch Models, Reboxx and others.

If you have an idea, would like to present a clinic, would be willing
to open your layout to visitors, or have a
question or comment, please contact me at daowens@gmail.com.

Please check our www.neprototypemeet.com for updates.

Admission is $25 in advance and $30 at the door.

Thanks very much.

Dave Owens

P.S. -- I've tried to hit several email lists, but no doubt have
missed some I should be posting to. Please crosspost this to lists you
believe are appropriate.

--
2010 New England/Northeast Prototype Modelers Meet
June 4-5, 2010 (Always the weekend after Memorial Day)
Collinsville, Connecticut
www.neprototypemeet.com

94401 - 94420 of 182364