Date   

Re: Bieber 1947 4th quarter *02 cars

Dave Nelson
 

Tim, I made several mistakes: not finding the HH Copeland report, a
definiative source, was #1. Typing w/o first refreshing my memory was
clearly #2. My bad.

Dave Nelson

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tim
O'Connor
Sent: Saturday, November 21, 2009 1:00 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Bieber 1947 4th quarter *02 cars


Dave Nelson, I hope you're paying attention! :-) The list below is 247 cars,
just 1/100 of the numbers (00-99). If the distribution of numbers is uniform
(I know, fat chance) that would be 247*100 or 24,700 cars through Bieber in
3 months -- My original guess was 20,000 to 30,000 cars. Your estimate was
4,000 cars, IIRC.

Tim O'Connor


Re: tools (was Re: Molded-on Grab Irons)

Tim O'Connor
 

One of my favorite tools is this "seam scraper" from MicroMark.
Actually, I use it as a REAMER. It is very sharp and pointed, and
it can ream out very small holes and cuts through Delrin etc
beautifully. It's probably good for seam scraping too. :-)

http://www.micromark.com/SEAM-SCRAPER,7547.html

Tim O'Connor

At 11/21/2009 03:25 PM Saturday, you wrote:
The flush end-nippers that Klein once made, and that PPE still
supplies are the handiest off all tools for removing the bulk of cast-
on molded detailing. By removing most of the "overburden" with these
flush-cutters, this then allows the use of a sharp chisel blade to
finish the work with minimal chance of collateral damage. My " sharp
chisel blade" is one of several X-acto blades that have been ground to
shape, i.e. to a narrower profile, and have the corners rounded off.

IMHO, the most important issue with the good use of these blades is to
keep them SHARP! My small Arkansas whet stone is out on the bench
along with a piece of scrap leather as a strop, and I will commonly
whet and strop the blade several times during a sitting or session. I
do the same with razor blades, and in this regard, both X-acto and
good razor blades will last an entire season; and they are sharper and
smoother in doing so than when they were first removed from their
packaging. When the blades become nicked or the profiles are no longer
level -and will no longer hold an edge-, only then do they get the
heave-ho.

I have the Micro Mark chisel, and although I do like it, its use has
not yet persuaded me to give up my handy-dandy razor and X-acto blades.

Denny


Re: Bieber 1947 4th quarter *02 cars

Tim O'Connor
 

Dave Nelson, I hope you're paying attention! :-) The list below
is 247 cars, just 1/100 of the numbers (00-99). If the distribution
of numbers is uniform (I know, fat chance) that would be 247*100
or 24,700 cars through Bieber in 3 months -- My original guess
was 20,000 to 30,000 cars. Your estimate was 4,000 cars, IIRC.

Tim O'Connor

At 11/21/2009 01:46 PM Saturday, you wrote:
Cars through Bieber 1947 4th quarter ending 02
GN - 35
ATSF - 27
PFE - 23
DRGW - 21
WP - 13
SP - 12
UP - 10
PRR - 10
Milw - 10
NYC - 7
NP - 6
IC - 6
CRIP - 6
WFE - 5
MDT - 5
ART - 5
FGE - 5
Wab - 3
UCR - 3
Sou - 3
NW - 3
strays Soo,SLSF,SCCX,SAL,LN,GMO,CSVX,CBQ,BRE,BO,
WLE, UTLX, SFRD, RDY, RDG, PE, NRC, MP,MOP,LV,LA,ITC,CRP CNJ,CN, CMO, CG, CA, BLE, ACL

not sure about a few of these like CRP 1902, RDY 1902

Allen Rueter


Re: Molded-on Grab Irons and grab iron bending device

Tim O'Connor
 

I believe AMB makes an acrylic grab iron bending jig with
multiple sizes. Also Tichy includes jigs of various kinds
in their kits such as ladder drilling jigs. My workspace is
littered with jigs of all kinds, some of them homemade.

Tim O'Connor


Re: Molded-on Grab Irons (was: Heap Shields)

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

The flush end-nippers that Klein once made, and that PPE still supplies are the handiest off all tools for removing the bulk of cast- on molded detailing. By removing most of the "overburden" with these flush-cutters, this then allows the use of a sharp chisel blade to finish the work with minimal chance of collateral damage. My " sharp chisel blade" is one of several X-acto blades that have been ground to shape, i.e. to a narrower profile, and have the corners rounded off.

IMHO, the most important issue with the good use of these blades is to keep them SHARP! My small Arkansas whet stone is out on the bench along with a piece of scrap leather as a strop, and I will commonly whet and strop the blade several times during a sitting or session. I do the same with razor blades, and in this regard, both X-acto and good razor blades will last an entire season; and they are sharper and smoother in doing so than when they were first removed from their packaging. When the blades become nicked or the profiles are no longer level -and will no longer hold an edge-, only then do they get the heave-ho.

I have the Micro Mark chisel, and although I do like it, its use has not yet persuaded me to give up my handy-dandy razor and X-acto blades.

Denny


Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento


Re: Bieber 1947 4th quarter *02 cars

Frank Valoczy <destron@...>
 


not sure about a few of these like CRP 1902, RDY 1902
I don't know what RDY is, but CRP is Central of Pennsylvania, which was a
subsidiary of Central of New Jersey for tax purposes. IIRC it was a court
order in 1952(?) that forced CNJ to abolish the CRP.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC


Re: Bieber 1947 4th quarter *01 cars (title correction)

Allen Rueter
 

Just one CN 47902

--
Allen Rueter StLouis MO


Re: Bieber 1947 4th quarter *01 cars (title correction)

Robert kirkham
 

So not a single Canadian car moving on this line with a car number ending with either 01 or 02?

Rob Kirkham

--------------------------------------------------
From: "allen_282" <allen_282@yahoo.com>
Sent: Saturday, November 21, 2009 10:26 AM
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Bieber 1947 4th quarter *01 cars (title correction)

Well craps, these are the *01 cars, not *02

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "allen_282" <allen_282@...> wrote:

cars numbers ending with 02 at Bieber 4th quarter out of 259
GN - 40 - tho 2 cars make up 30 entries, with 2-5 day cycle times.
ATsf - 29
Rg/DRG - 28
SP - 17
PFE - 14
Pa/PRR - 12
BO - 8
CBQ - 7
NYC - 7
UTLX -7
IC - 5
RI - 5
Sou - 5
UP - 5
WP - 5
TCX -4
CO - 3
CSVX - 3 (all same car)
DLW - 3
FGE - 3
GATX - 3
LN - 3
Milw - 3
REX - 3
SCCX - 3
strays - ACL,ART,BLE,CGW,CEI,CNW,CRP,CRR, Erie, HTCX, MP, NH, NKP,
NP, NS, NW, PM, Pmcky (SF)Rd , SAL, SLSF, UCR, Wab, WLE

Allen Rueter
while watching the Packers win :)



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Bieber 1947 4th quarter *02 cars

Allen Rueter
 

Cars through Bieber 1947 4th quarter ending 02
GN - 35
ATSF - 27
PFE - 23
DRGW - 21
WP - 13
SP - 12
UP - 10
PRR - 10
Milw - 10
NYC - 7
NP - 6
IC - 6
CRIP - 6
WFE - 5
MDT - 5
ART - 5
FGE - 5
Wab - 3
UCR - 3
Sou - 3
NW - 3
strays Soo,SLSF,SCCX,SAL,LN,GMO,CSVX,CBQ,BRE,BO,
WLE, UTLX, SFRD, RDY, RDG, PE, NRC, MP,MOP,LV,LA,ITC,CRP CNJ,CN, CMO, CG, CA, BLE, ACL

not sure about a few of these like CRP 1902, RDY 1902

Allen Rueter


Bieber 1947 4th quarter *01 cars (title correction)

Allen Rueter
 

Well craps, these are the *01 cars, not *02

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "allen_282" <allen_282@...> wrote:

cars numbers ending with 02 at Bieber 4th quarter out of 259
GN - 40 - tho 2 cars make up 30 entries, with 2-5 day cycle times.
ATsf - 29
Rg/DRG - 28
SP - 17
PFE - 14
Pa/PRR - 12
BO - 8
CBQ - 7
NYC - 7
UTLX -7
IC - 5
RI - 5
Sou - 5
UP - 5
WP - 5
TCX -4
CO - 3
CSVX - 3 (all same car)
DLW - 3
FGE - 3
GATX - 3
LN - 3
Milw - 3
REX - 3
SCCX - 3
strays - ACL,ART,BLE,CGW,CEI,CNW,CRP,CRR, Erie, HTCX, MP, NH, NKP,
NP, NS, NW, PM, Pmcky (SF)Rd , SAL, SLSF, UCR, Wab, WLE

Allen Rueter
while watching the Packers win :)


Re: Molded-on Grab Irons and grab iron bending device

Dennis Williams
 

I have one of these benders and would like to sell it. Just don't need it.  Dennis
Dennis Williams
Munhall, Pa.
www.resinbuilders4u.com

--- On Sat, 11/21/09, cobrapsl@aol.com <cobrapsl@aol.com> wrote:


From: cobrapsl@aol.com <cobrapsl@aol.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Molded-on Grab Irons and grab iron bending device
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Saturday, November 21, 2009, 8:05 AM


 




Schuyler,

You need to buy the tool and you will see what I am talking about! It is not anywhere as simple as putting a piece of tape on a tapered nose pliers--which I also have in my toolbox.

Paul Lyons
Laguna Niguel, CA

-----Original Message-----
From: Schuyler Larrabee <schuyler.larrabee@ verizon.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups. com
Sent: Sat, Nov 21, 2009 7:28 am
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Molded-on Grab Irons and grab iron bending device

What is "misleading? " If you're making grabs with it, you need to know what the width is in full-size inch or metric measure, which isn't too terribly much to ask, or you can use your scale rule to find the right width. The world doesn't owe HO modelers (and I am one) everything marked to HO scale. I was (and still am) thinking that could be a very useful tool. I confess to being a toolaholic, however. I generally find the right place on my tapered-jaw needlenose pliers to place the wire to bend grabs to the right width. Mark it with a bit of tape, and I get repeatable results.

SGL

Ken,

Your post is a bit mis-leading regarding the the Mission Models M10-06 "Grabhandler" . It is a fanastic tool, but the
manufactured "spacings" are not HO scale and of little use unless you customize the tool as I have done.

Paul Lyons
Laguna NIguel, CA

-----Original Message-----
From: va661midlo@comcast. net <mailto:va661midlo% 40comcast. net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups. com <mailto:STMFC% 40yahoogroups. com>
Sent: Sat, Nov 21, 2009 5:46 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Molded-on Grab Irons and grab iron bending device

1. Grab iron removal:

I have used the #18 chisel blade from X-acto after rounding off the corners to avoid gouging. I started doing so in the
1980's, and presented several clinics at NMRA regional and national conventions on this process. I did not have any
problems with the blade being too flexible. It can be re-sharpened with a whetstone.

In addition to the Micro-Mark chisel, a very nice (and very sharp) chisel is made by Mission Models (M10-09). The
Mission Models chisel would be my first choice -- sharper replaceable blade with a smaller chisel face, and lighter
weight than Micro-Mark chisel.

For me, the trick to removing cast-on grab irons, ladders, etc., is not to try to remove every bit of the cast-on item by
using the chisel. After removing all but a fine layer of the cast-on item, I then used increasingly fine grades of
"sandpaper" to remove the remaining part of the cast-on item. Then, as another participant in this group suggested, use
0000 (4 zeros) grade steel wool to finish off any trace of the former cast-on item.

2. Grab irons.

Mission Models also makes a device for creating grabirons with varying widths between the ends. The part number is
M10-06.

Mission Models also has other tools for bending frets, etc. of etched brass. Their line of tools is impressive.

Mission Models website is: www.missionmodels. com. The company appears to cater to mililtary modelers as well as
model railroaders.

Ken Montero

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








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Re: Molded-on Grab Irons and grab iron bending device

Paul Lyons
 

Schuyler,

You need to buy the tool and you will see what I am talking about! It is not anywhere as simple as putting a piece of tape on a tapered nose pliers--which I also have in my toolbox.

Paul Lyons
Laguna Niguel, CA

-----Original Message-----
From: Schuyler Larrabee <schuyler.larrabee@verizon.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sat, Nov 21, 2009 7:28 am
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Molded-on Grab Irons and grab iron bending device





What is "misleading?" If you're making grabs with it, you need to know what the width is in full-size inch or metric measure, which isn't too terribly much to ask, or you can use your scale rule to find the right width. The world doesn't owe HO modelers (and I am one) everything marked to HO scale. I was (and still am) thinking that could be a very useful tool. I confess to being a toolaholic, however. I generally find the right place on my tapered-jaw needlenose pliers to place the wire to bend grabs to the right width. Mark it with a bit of tape, and I get repeatable results.

SGL

Ken,

Your post is a bit mis-leading regarding the the Mission Models M10-06 "Grabhandler". It is a fanastic tool, but the
manufactured "spacings" are not HO scale and of little use unless you customize the tool as I have done.

Paul Lyons
Laguna NIguel, CA

-----Original Message-----
From: va661midlo@comcast.net <mailto:va661midlo%40comcast.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sat, Nov 21, 2009 5:46 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Molded-on Grab Irons and grab iron bending device

1. Grab iron removal:

I have used the #18 chisel blade from X-acto after rounding off the corners to avoid gouging. I started doing so in the
1980's, and presented several clinics at NMRA regional and national conventions on this process. I did not have any
problems with the blade being too flexible. It can be re-sharpened with a whetstone.

In addition to the Micro-Mark chisel, a very nice (and very sharp) chisel is made by Mission Models (M10-09). The
Mission Models chisel would be my first choice -- sharper replaceable blade with a smaller chisel face, and lighter
weight than Micro-Mark chisel.

For me, the trick to removing cast-on grab irons, ladders, etc., is not to try to remove every bit of the cast-on item by
using the chisel. After removing all but a fine layer of the cast-on item, I then used increasingly fine grades of
"sandpaper" to remove the remaining part of the cast-on item. Then, as another participant in this group suggested, use
0000 (4 zeros) grade steel wool to finish off any trace of the former cast-on item.

2. Grab irons.

Mission Models also makes a device for creating grabirons with varying widths between the ends. The part number is
M10-06.

Mission Models also has other tools for bending frets, etc. of etched brass. Their line of tools is impressive.

Mission Models website is: www.missionmodels.com. The company appears to cater to mililtary modelers as well as
model railroaders.

Ken Montero



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








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Re: Molded-on Grab Irons and grab iron bending device

Schuyler Larrabee
 

What is "misleading?" If you're making grabs with it, you need to know what the width is in full-size inch or metric measure, which isn't too terribly much to ask, or you can use your scale rule to find the right width. The world doesn't owe HO modelers (and I am one) everything marked to HO scale. I was (and still am) thinking that could be a very useful tool. I confess to being a toolaholic, however. I generally find the right place on my tapered-jaw needlenose pliers to place the wire to bend grabs to the right width. Mark it with a bit of tape, and I get repeatable results.

SGL

Ken,

Your post is a bit mis-leading regarding the the Mission Models M10-06 "Grabhandler". It is a fanastic tool, but the
manufactured "spacings" are not HO scale and of little use unless you customize the tool as I have done.

Paul Lyons
Laguna NIguel, CA

-----Original Message-----
From: va661midlo@comcast.net <mailto:va661midlo%40comcast.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sat, Nov 21, 2009 5:46 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Molded-on Grab Irons and grab iron bending device

1. Grab iron removal:

I have used the #18 chisel blade from X-acto after rounding off the corners to avoid gouging. I started doing so in the
1980's, and presented several clinics at NMRA regional and national conventions on this process. I did not have any
problems with the blade being too flexible. It can be re-sharpened with a whetstone.

In addition to the Micro-Mark chisel, a very nice (and very sharp) chisel is made by Mission Models (M10-09). The
Mission Models chisel would be my first choice -- sharper replaceable blade with a smaller chisel face, and lighter
weight than Micro-Mark chisel.

For me, the trick to removing cast-on grab irons, ladders, etc., is not to try to remove every bit of the cast-on item by
using the chisel. After removing all but a fine layer of the cast-on item, I then used increasingly fine grades of
"sandpaper" to remove the remaining part of the cast-on item. Then, as another participant in this group suggested, use
0000 (4 zeros) grade steel wool to finish off any trace of the former cast-on item.

2. Grab irons.

Mission Models also makes a device for creating grabirons with varying widths between the ends. The part number is
M10-06.

Mission Models also has other tools for bending frets, etc. of etched brass. Their line of tools is impressive.

Mission Models website is: www.missionmodels.com. The company appears to cater to mililtary modelers as well as
model railroaders.

Ken Montero












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Re: Molded-on Grab Irons and grab iron bending device

Paul Lyons
 

Ken,

Your post is a bit mis-leading regarding the the Mission Models M10-06 "Grabhandler". It is a fanastic tool, but the manufactured "spacings" are not HO scale and of little use unless you customize the tool as I have done.

Paul Lyons
Laguna NIguel, CA

-----Original Message-----
From: va661midlo@comcast.net
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sat, Nov 21, 2009 5:46 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Molded-on Grab Irons and grab iron bending device






1. Grab iron removal:

I have used the #18 chisel blade from X-acto after rounding off the corners to avoid gouging. I started doing so in the 1980's, and presented several clinics at NMRA regional and national conventions on this process. I did not have any problems with the blade being too flexible. It can be re-sharpened with a whetstone.

In addition to the Micro-Mark chisel, a very nice (and very sharp) chisel is made by Mission Models (M10-09). The Mission Models chisel would be my first choice -- sharper replaceable blade with a smaller chisel face, and lighter weight than Micro-Mark chisel.

For me, the trick to removing cast-on grab irons, ladders, etc., is not to try to remove every bit of the cast-on item by using the chisel. After removing all but a fine layer of the cast-on item, I then used increasingly fine grades of "sandpaper" to remove the remaining part of the cast-on item. Then, as another participant in this group suggested, use 0000 (4 zeros) grade steel wool to finish off any trace of the former cast-on item.

2. Grab irons.

Mission Models also makes a device for creating grabirons with varying widths between the ends. The part number is M10-06.

Mission Models also has other tools for bending frets, etc. of etched brass. Their line of tools is impressive.

Mission Models website is: www.missionmodels.com. The company appears to cater to mililtary modelers as well as model railroaders.

Ken Montero

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Molded-on Grab Irons (was: Heap Shields)

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Thanks, Bill, for the product numbers. They seem pretty thick, and one advantage of the Xacto
blades (if you knock off the corners) is that they are thin. Do you not find these tools sort of
bottom out on adjacent, um, "stuff?"

SGL

I agree with Tom. It's a great tool. None of the collateral damamge that comes with Xacto chisel
blades.

You will need to keep your whetstone handy for continued good performance. It does need periodic
sharpening.

Bill McCoy
Jax. FL

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , <tmolsen@...> wrote:

Al,

Micro-Mark makes a tool that you can use to remove cast-on ladders, grabs and other offending
items without
damaging the car bodies. I have the standard sized model and really does work!

It is a stainless steel chisel, 6-1/2" long and 4mm wide. The catalog description and part
number is: #80893 Plastic
Modeler's Chisel @ $18.95.

It also comes in a smaller version. The catalog description and part number is: #82709 Special
Narrow Version with
2mm wide cutting edge @ $18.95.

You can order on-line at: http://www.micromark.com/ <http://www.micromark.com/>;

The tool is listed in the Holiday Catalog on page 33.

Best regards,
Tom Olsen

Thomas M. Olsen




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Re: Molded-on Grab Irons and grab iron bending device

Kenneth Montero
 

1. Grab iron removal:

I have used the #18 chisel blade from X-acto after rounding off the corners to avoid gouging. I started doing so in the 1980's, and presented several clinics at NMRA regional and national conventions on this process. I did not have any problems with the blade being too flexible. It can be re-sharpened with a whetstone.

In addition to the Micro-Mark chisel, a very nice (and very sharp) chisel is made by Mission Models (M10-09). The Mission Models chisel would be my first choice -- sharper replaceable blade with a smaller chisel face, and lighter weight than Micro-Mark chisel.

For me, the trick to removing cast-on grab irons, ladders, etc., is not to try to remove every bit of the cast-on item by using the chisel. After removing all but a fine layer of the cast-on item, I then used increasingly fine grades of "sandpaper" to remove the remaining part of the cast-on item. Then, as another participant in this group suggested, use 0000 (4 zeros) grade steel wool to finish off any trace of the former cast-on item.

2. Grab irons.

Mission Models also makes a device for creating grabirons with varying widths between the ends. The part number is M10-06.

Mission Models also has other tools for bending frets, etc. of etched brass. Their line of tools is impressive.

Mission Models website is: www.missionmodels.com. The company appears to cater to mililtary modelers as well as model railroaders.

Ken Montero


Re: Molded-on Grab Irons (was: Heap Shields)

Bill McCoy
 

I agree with Tom. It's a great tool. None of the collateral damamge that comes with Xacto chisel blades.

You will need to keep your whetstone handy for continued good performance. It does need periodic sharpening.

Bill McCoy
Jax. FL

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, <tmolsen@...> wrote:

Al,

Micro-Mark makes a tool that you can use to remove cast-on ladders, grabs and other offending items without damaging the car bodies. I have the standard sized model and really does work!

It is a stainless steel chisel, 6-1/2" long and 4mm wide. The catalog description and part number is: #80893 Plastic Modeler's Chisel @ $18.95.

It also comes in a smaller version. The catalog description and part number is: #82709 Special Narrow Version with 2mm wide cutting edge @ $18.95.

You can order on-line at: http://www.micromark.com/

The tool is listed in the Holiday Catalog on page 33.

Best regards,
Tom Olsen

Thomas M. Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@...


UP Gondola

roblmclear <rob.mclear2@...>
 

Hi to all

This message was posted on the Union Pacific list can anyone help out??

Rob

Union Pacific has donated GS gondola UP 61078 to the Pacific Locomotive Association. It has been moved recently to the PLA's Niles Canyon Railway in Sunol, CA. This car had sat for a number of years in Eugene, OR. I'm new to the list so I hope you guys can help me. I maintain the roster for the PLA and I'm looking for any information you can give on this car. I need the following info:

UP class:
Year built:

If any extra info such as what year it was upgraded with roller bearing trucks or operational history is available, I can include that info too. The little bit of info I have found on-line shows two different paint schemes. One with a small UNION PACIFIC over the reporting marks (see the Red Caboose HO scale model) and as it is painted today with a big UNION PACIFIC centered on the side. When did UP go to the big lettering? I also saw a model where the ends
were black and the sides boxcar red (or whatever UP calls their standard freight car color). Was this a standard and if so when was it used? The reason I would like to know about paint history is that our museum covers the period of 1930 to 1960 so when we repaint equipment we try to match the way it would have looked
within that period.

Thanks for any help you can give.

Joe Mann
Pacific Locmotive Assn.


Re: Heap Shields was Re: Re: Accurail Offset Twin

CJ Riley
 

-


Can a limited run set of resin-cast parts be easily made off of
soft tooling made off these brass model ends?


If CJR wants to make the brass ends available for that, yes.>

Despite having once been in the resin casting business, I'm not inclined to do it, but I would be cooperative if someone else wanted to.
CJ Riley
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Re: Need help identifying a tank car

Frank Greene
 

Tony, Richard, and Mike, thanks. We can always count on y'all for useful information.

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Frank Greene
Memphis, TN

94541 - 94560 of 181087