Date   

Re: travel to Cocoa Beach

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Tony Thompson says:


I'd been planning to bring a group of model freight cars to
Cocoa but the recent news about airline security seems worrying. Has
anyone heard anything specific about searches of carry-on luggage? One
of those nightmare scenarios is the ham-fisted TSA guy wrenching
models out of boxes.
The easiest way to insure that models will not be tampered with is also more costly...probably. One never knows with airlines. Anyhow...too late this yr...but when I went to the NMRA National in Seattle in 2004, the security line consisted of three people...and my wife and I were two of them. How could this be? We went out of Melbourne, FL. Unfortunately, you also have to leave via another small airport on the way back to achieve the same effect. Leaving Seattle, someone had, apparently, decided that the best way to keep Osamma Hisself from boarding one of our planes was to check out every male of over 6'3". Presto! I was led into a private area and my shoes were searched with infinite care. Fortunately, I did not have one of my SC&F head end cars hidden in one of my shoes. Now, I had no problem with the search...but the security guys in Melbourne apparently heard me speak and determined I was not from the Middle East...Anyhow, the security line in Seattle was about 300 people...and we were 2 of them.

Good luck. I want to see the models.

Incidentally...I hope Judge Brock doesn't beat up on me too much for going out of scope...sorta [ I'm guessing he won't ], but I'll be bringing my UP 200,000 gal steel water tank and water treatment plant to Prototype Rails. Why is this significant? I just finished applying Archer rivets to it. It's not complete but has about 80% of the rivets needed. Maybe I'll find time to finish it. Anyhow, I used the double row for those in the upright position...as the photos show...and single row for parallel. I'm going to do a clinic on it on Thursday night at 9:30PM. I learned a few lessons regarding applying long decals of rivets which I'll share...if I'm still standing by then AND remotely coherent. This follows my op session earlier and various start up activities at the hotel. Should be fun.

Mike Brock


Re: NEWSPRINT

Paul <buygone@...>
 

Schuyler:



4" of reinforced concrete is all that was needed for the landing pads on the
intermodal trailers at the Southern Pacific ramps. When you consider that
some of the trailers grossed out at just under 60,000 lbs, the pressure
under the sand shoes was a lot greater than the forklift wheels even under
load. 5" was more than needed and 10" would be an overkill.



Paul C. Koehler



_____

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Schuyler Larrabee
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2009 6:29 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] NEWSPRINT





Several people have written in this thread something on the order of

Nothing special just a concrete dock
Well, actually I'd be pretty sure that the concrete dock is a little bit
special as it has to be
quite thick to withstand the shear pressures involved, particularly in a
warehouse where they may be
stacked two-high. There are also some extraordinary stresses when a forklift
carries these things
around. An ordinary concrete slab on a loading dock is likely 5" thick. I'd
guess that the
concrete slab for the loading dock designed for large paper in rolls would
be at least 10", maybe
12"

SGL

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Re: travel to Cocoa Beach

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

Tony,
As has been suggested in the past would mailing (or UPS/FedEx) them be better. It's kind of a crap shoot anyway it's tried. UPS/FedEx are usually good about the 5 working days. I have found that UPS you have to declare a value and pay for insurance but FedEx you just declare a value. I found this out by shipping some silver to a foundry. They (FedEx) insured it for over a thousand and didn't charge any extra.

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


travel to Cocoa Beach

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

I'd been planning to bring a group of model freight cars to Cocoa but the recent news about airline security seems worrying. Has anyone heard anything specific about searches of carry-on luggage? One of those nightmare scenarios is the ham-fisted TSA guy wrenching models out of boxes.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: NEWSPRINT

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Several people have written in this thread something on the order of

Nothing special just a concrete dock
Well, actually I'd be pretty sure that the concrete dock is a little bit special as it has to be
quite thick to withstand the shear pressures involved, particularly in a warehouse where they may be
stacked two-high. There are also some extraordinary stresses when a forklift carries these things
around. An ordinary concrete slab on a loading dock is likely 5" thick. I'd guess that the
concrete slab for the loading dock designed for large paper in rolls would be at least 10", maybe
12"

SGL






E-mail message checked by Spyware Doctor (7.0.0.508)
Database version: 6.14030
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Re: NEWSPRINT

Douglas Harding <dharding@...>
 

As a kid in the 60's, I carried papers for the local twice weekly, which had it's own printing press back then. Paperboys were
suppose to enter via the back loading dock to get our papers, not the front office entry, so I witnessed the unloading of paper
rolls. The loading dock was a raised open concrete affair. The paper rolls came in an enclosed back of a straight van body
delivery truck. I don't recall a forklift. The paper rolls were placed on a wheeled frame, similar to a barrel rack and rolled
into place to reload the printing press. The rack was at the right height to allow the paper to roll right into the press, once
the "axle" had been inserted into the roll. Extra rolls were stored near the loading dock, so delivery was not an every week
occurrence. It is quite possible they came standing on end (eye to the sky) and tipped over onto a tilted up rack, just like
handling a barrel, only larger round object.

I don't know where paper came from, the town was served by both the RI & the CB&Q, but neither had tracks anywhere near the
newspaper building. If paper came via boxcar I suspect the newspaper had a warehouse where paper was stored then the local truck
was sent every time they needed paper. Or more likely the paper was shipped to a warehouse in Des Moines and local paper sent a
truck to Des Moines each time it need a few rolls.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org


Was Wilson - NRHS

rdgbuff56
 

Rich,
This is a great site. I will have to look over it to see how to take the dates. It has for the Reading:
RDG NS 7/99 7/2000 Does that mean they only used the reporting marks for that period of time? Their is still a Reading covered hopper in original paint and reporting marks in my area. I saw it yesterday headed north through town.

Francis A. Pehowic, Jr. in Sunbury, Pa.




________________________________
From: "SUVCWORR@aol.com" <SUVCWORR@aol.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thu, December 31, 2009 1:28:02 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Wilson reefer (bogus?)



Tim,

According to the NRHS website TRAX was first added in 4/54 by ART.

http://www.nrhs. com/reporting_ marks/aar_ reporting_ marks.htm

Rich Orr

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@ comcast.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups. com
Sent: Thu, Dec 31, 2009 12:06 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Wilson reefer (bogus?)

Gene, you've made me wonder about the relative sizes of Swift,
Armour and Wilson. (To say nothing of Oscar Mayer, et al)

Looking at fleets, in 1953 there were

4000 SRLX (Swift) reefers
= 3747 ARLX (Armour) reefers
= 1469 WCLX (Wilson) reefers

However I'm not sure if there were other reporting marks used
by these companies. I have later 50's photos of Armour TRAX cars
for example. I can't pinpoint when they began using the TRAX mark.

Tim O'Connor

At 12/30/2009 11:01 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
Thanks to all who answered. Your answers were about what I expected but, since
I really didn't know, I thought I would ask. My layout would likely only see
the occasional Wilson reefer. Swift and Armour will be more frequent visitors.

Just received a new, unused Jack Sprat label which will be scanned for a sign
or two on Western Grocers in Marshalltown.

Again, thanks to all.
Gene Green
------------ --------- --------- ------

Yahoo! Groups Links


New Year

Marcelo Lordeiro <mrcustom@...>
 

A great NEW YEAR < on the tracks > to Everyone !



Marcelo Lordeiro

www.mrcustom.com.br

trens@mrcustom.com.br

Tel.: +55 21 2273-2758


Happy New Years

Dennis Williams
 

Happy New Years to Everyone!!!
Dennis
Dennis Williams
Munhall, Pa.
www.resinbuilders4u.com


Re: NEWSPRINT

Jim Lancaster
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "geodyssey" <riverob@...> wrote:

Isn't there a huge rail-served Times printing plant in Santa Ana or Costa Mesa, visible just north of the I-405?
Yes. I drove by it about two weeks ago and there were five or six boxcars spotted at the dock.

Jim Lancaster


Re: Coal: Pre-1900 list?

water.kresse@...
 

Is there a freight car list that specializes in post-Civil War to pre-WW1 coal rail operations?



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----
From: "David Allen" <dallen@nmu.edu>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2009 2:46:13 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [STMFC] Coal: Coos Bay and Vancouver Island

Esteemed colleagues:

I offer the following, hoping for the indulgence of the prosecutor,
judge (no jury) and jailer Mr. Brock.

Abdill, in This Was Railroading, pg 186, has a photo of the Beaver
Hill tipple. It is not particularly small. CBR&E $5 is spotting some
CBR&E coal cars for loading; a loaded car is in the foreground. It is
ToC era. (As a side note, does anybody know where I can find
additional information about these coal cars?) And on pg 186 is a
photo which has a ramp up to one of the bay-side coal dock. Obviously
a commercial venture at that time.

Austin and Dill, in The Southern Pacific in Oregon, have some
discussion about this mine as well. A photo on pg 234, taken in 1914,
shows a coal dock in Marshfield - a single-sided dock like the one in
Two Harbors, MN, but quite a bit shorter, with a covered top. And they
say: "In the summer of 1894 a two-mile branch had been extended west
from Beaver Hill Junction to the Beaver Hill coal mine by the Coos
Bay, Roseburg and Eastern Railroad & Navigation Company. Initially the
coal was hauled to Marshfield for loading onto ships. When the
Southern Pacific obtained control of the Coos Bay, Roseburg and
Eastern Railroad & Navigation Company they intended to use the coal
for locomotive fuel. However, the coal proved to be a poor grade,
unsuitable for locomotives, and the plan, which proved to be an
embarrassment for certain Southern Pacific officials, was dropped. The
Beaver Hill spur was abandoned in November of 1926."

And I do not believe that Vancouver Island Coal has been mentioned.
While initially mined by the original inhabitants of the island
commercial mining didn't start until a bit before 1850 at Fort Rupert
at the northern tip of the island. But the more southerly mines on the
east side of the island were the favored developments, initially by
Robert Dunsmuir in 1850. And these various mines continued in
operation through the steam era. Turner, in Vancouver Islands
Railroads, discusses this quite well.

Many thanks to the data provided by Nelson and the map provided by
Karig; these items present the "modern" (for a 1905 modeler) context
quite nicely.

Dave Allen


New Barber Lateral Motion Truck

brianleppert@att.net
 

A Barber Lateral Motion 50-Ton freight car truck is now available in HO scale from Tahoe Model Works.

The Barber Lateral Motion Device used steel rollers and a roller seat between the springs and special bolster to provide a little side-to-side movement of the car body to the truck, resulting in a smoother ride and reduced wear to wheel flanges, journals and couplers. John C. Barber invented this device and formed the Standard Car Truck Company in the late 1890s to market arch bar trucks with this feature. It was later applied to Andrews, T-Section Bettendorfs, Vulcans and eventually ARA trucks with one-piece U section sideframes--what our hobby has called a "bettendorf".

The spotting feature for trucks with the BLM device is the narrow horizontal roller seat casting located between the top of the springs and the truck bolster. Examples may be seen in Richard Hendrickson's truck article in Railway Prototype Cyclopedia #4, Figs. 1, 6, 7, 10, 12, 19 and 42. Fig. 23 is the BLM device adapted to a Barber S-1 truck, in this case with a modified spring package for NYC's LCL Pacemaker service. Fig. 15 is actually, I believe, a rare Symington Lateral Motion truck.

More photos of trucks with the BLM device can be found in Richard's truck article in the Feb. '90 issue of Railmodel Journal, #1, 6, 8, 11, 12, 14, 15, 17, 18, 21 and 22.

Drawings of trucks with The Barber Lateral Motion Device can be found in these Car Builders' Cyclopedias: 1922(pages 608, 609), 1925(pages 606,607), 1928(pages 776,777), 1931(pages 766, 768, 769), 1937(pages 912, 914), 1940(pages 1123, 1138) and 1943(page 1096).

U-section trucks with this feature were manufactured from the early 1920s to the late 1930s. Railroads that fully embraced this style of truck included ATSF, B&O, CB&Q, CP, C&NW, DL&W, IC, NP, RI, SL-SF, SP, T&NO, UP and WP. Also PFE and SFRD.

CN, CV, CogG, C&EI, Erie, GTW, MP and T&P all had some cars with Barber Lateral Motion trucks, as well as a few cars owned by C&O, Wabash and Western Maryland.

For most of these railroads, purchases of Barber Lateral Motion trucks ended with the Great Depression. However, B&O, CB&Q and CP continued buying them into the later parts of the 1930s.

The shape of sideframes varied greatly, as was typical of trucks of that period. The prototype trucks for TMW's offering have sideframes cast by American Steel Foundries in the 1940s for both SP and UP. These were actually replacement sideframes for older trucks, most likely T-section Bettendorfs.

Prototype research was conduted at the Nevada State Railroad Museum in Carson City, NV and at the Western Pacific Railroad Museum at Portola, CA.

Flyers for these new HO trucks are still available. Please contact me OFF-LIST at

brianleppert@att.net

Rob Adams should soon be posting the new flyer and order form on steamfreightcars.com . You can also find info of all of Tahoe Model Works trucks there, listed under Modeling, and then Detail Parts.

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV


Coal: Coos Bay and Vancouver Island

David Allen
 

Esteemed colleagues:

I offer the following, hoping for the indulgence of the prosecutor,
judge (no jury) and jailer Mr. Brock.

Abdill, in This Was Railroading, pg 186, has a photo of the Beaver
Hill tipple. It is not particularly small. CBR&E $5 is spotting some
CBR&E coal cars for loading; a loaded car is in the foreground. It is
ToC era. (As a side note, does anybody know where I can find
additional information about these coal cars?) And on pg 186 is a
photo which has a ramp up to one of the bay-side coal dock. Obviously
a commercial venture at that time.

Austin and Dill, in The Southern Pacific in Oregon, have some
discussion about this mine as well. A photo on pg 234, taken in 1914,
shows a coal dock in Marshfield - a single-sided dock like the one in
Two Harbors, MN, but quite a bit shorter, with a covered top. And they
say: "In the summer of 1894 a two-mile branch had been extended west
from Beaver Hill Junction to the Beaver Hill coal mine by the Coos
Bay, Roseburg and Eastern Railroad & Navigation Company. Initially the
coal was hauled to Marshfield for loading onto ships. When the
Southern Pacific obtained control of the Coos Bay, Roseburg and
Eastern Railroad & Navigation Company they intended to use the coal
for locomotive fuel. However, the coal proved to be a poor grade,
unsuitable for locomotives, and the plan, which proved to be an
embarrassment for certain Southern Pacific officials, was dropped. The
Beaver Hill spur was abandoned in November of 1926."

And I do not believe that Vancouver Island Coal has been mentioned.
While initially mined by the original inhabitants of the island
commercial mining didn't start until a bit before 1850 at Fort Rupert
at the northern tip of the island. But the more southerly mines on the
east side of the island were the favored developments, initially by
Robert Dunsmuir in 1850. And these various mines continued in
operation through the steam era. Turner, in Vancouver Islands
Railroads, discusses this quite well.

Many thanks to the data provided by Nelson and the map provided by
Karig; these items present the "modern" (for a 1905 modeler) context
quite nicely.

Dave Allen


Re: NEWSPRINT

Paul <buygone@...>
 

Paul:



LA Times owned Publishers Paper Co. in Portland OR. This is where their
newsprint came from by the trainload.



Paul C. Koehler



_____

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Paul
Catapano
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2009 9:54 AM
To: Steam_Era
Subject: [STMFC] NEWSPRINT





C. 1952

Was much newsprint produced in the US?
Or had it's production moved to Canada?

Paul Catapano


Re: NEWSPRINT

Greg Martin
 

Rob,

If memory serves me correct, it is the Herald Examiner plant. I can check tonight as I have an SP "Spins List" booklet for that area at home from the 80s.

Greg Martin

-----Original Message-----
From: geodyssey <riverob@gmail.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thu, Dec 31, 2009 7:12 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: NEWSPRINT




Isn't there a huge rail-served Times printing plant in Santa Ana or Costa Mesa, visible just north of the I-405?

When I was switching on the UP back in the late 70s-early 80s, a midnight job would take four 100-ton boxcars of paper three or four times a week to a Times printing plant via a switchback behind the DART warehouse. I think this plant printed phone books. An NW2 with a running start and sanding would not always be able to push two cars up the steep grade. Back up and take another run...

Rob Simpson

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Paul" <buygone@...> wrote:

Tim:



Not entirely true. The LA Times does not have a direct rail siding. Most
of the newsprint was received at the Southern Pacific's 8th Street paper
dock and trucked to the Times paper plant. They also received a portion via
water at the LA Harbor and that newsprint was also trucked to them.



Paul C. Koehler






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: NEWSPRINT

Dave Owens
 

My newspaper, The Hartford Courant, gets paper via the old CV and
sometimes at our siding on Amtrak's New Haven-Springfield line.

Most of the paper comes via the old CV and is transloaded at Monson,
Mass. into trucks for the final trip to the printing plant on the
first floor of our building in Hartford. Every once in a while,
though, I see a car or two on the siding.

I rarely see the NSC newsprint cars on the Hartford line so I don't
know what they're doing in New Haven. Maybe they're getting it by
truck too. The Waterbury Republican-American used to have regular
delivery of newsprint cars by Guilford (as regular as Guilford service
can be), although I don't know what the situation has been the past
few years.

What several folks have said about the importance of proper handling
is true. Although huge and heavy, rolls of newsprint are quite
fragile. And with the focus of using every bit of paper as can be used
in order to save money, divits in rolls and damaged ends are a huge
no-no.

Dave Owens
West Hartford, CT

.



--
2010 New England/Northeast Prototype Modelers Meet
June 4-5, 2010 (Always the weekend after Memorial Day)
Collinsville, Connecticut
www.neprototypemeet.com


Re: Wilson reefer (bogus?)

SUVCWORR@...
 

Tim,

According to the NRHS website TRAX was first added in 4/54 by ART.

http://www.nrhs.com/reporting_marks/aar_reporting_marks.htm

Rich Orr

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thu, Dec 31, 2009 12:06 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Wilson reefer (bogus?)


Gene, you've made me wonder about the relative sizes of Swift,
Armour and Wilson. (To say nothing of Oscar Mayer, et al)

Looking at fleets, in 1953 there were

4000 SRLX (Swift) reefers
= 3747 ARLX (Armour) reefers
= 1469 WCLX (Wilson) reefers

However I'm not sure if there were other reporting marks used
by these companies. I have later 50's photos of Armour TRAX cars
for example. I can't pinpoint when they began using the TRAX mark.

Tim O'Connor



At 12/30/2009 11:01 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
Thanks to all who answered. Your answers were about what I expected but, since
I really didn't know, I thought I would ask. My layout would likely only see
the occasional Wilson reefer. Swift and Armour will be more frequent visitors.

Just received a new, unused Jack Sprat label which will be scanned for a sign
or two on Western Grocers in Marshalltown.

Again, thanks to all.
Gene Green


------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: NEWSPRINT

cornbeltroute <cornbeltroute@...>
 

Joel,

Marty remarked on the Central Vermont's newsprint operation. For several years I have been reading the Boston & Maine list, too (BM_RR). If you search the archives there, can't imagine you won't find paper mill postings.

Model Railroad carried a detailed, two-part article on a New England paper mill. Perhaps Andy or Marty will correct me if needed, but I recall it centered on a B&M serviced industry at Berlin, N.H.:

* An industry you can model, part 1: Papermaking and the railroads
Model Railroader, October 1998 page 100
("MCGUIRK, MARTY", PAPER, PROTOTYPE)

* An industry you can model, part 2: Papermaking and the railroads today Model Railroader, November 1998 page 90
An industry with great kitbashing potential
("HEDIGER, JIM", PAPER, PROTOTYPE)

If my memory serves me well, Marty presented an N scale layout based on this mill, Jim an HO layout based on same. (I saved both articles, came across them recently, but think I can find them now? Nooooooo.)

I don't recall its name, but the printing plant just 10-12 miles north of Kalmbach's Waukesha offices is monstrously huge. Man, it's big, big, big. But, you're looking for a 1950s operation. I think the above MR articles would help you a lot.

Brian

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa


Re: Hopper train lines

bob_karig <karig@...>
 

I have just posted a copy of the brake arrangement drawing for the 50-ton, twin AAR Standard hopper car in the photo section. Unfortunately, I didn't copy the 70-ton version, but it should follow the 50-ton practice pretty closely.

Bob Karig

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Clark Propst" <cepropst@...> wrote:

Does the train line run along the outside of the frame on a AAR offset 3 bay hopper? (Like Stewart/Bowser and Accurail) If so, on which side of the car. I have a 3/4 photo of one car taken from the A end. It's not on that side of the car.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


NEWSPRINT

Paul Catapano
 

C. 1952
 
Was much newsprint produced in the US?
Or had it's production moved to Canada?

Paul Catapano

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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