Date   

Re: Canadian tank cars south of 49; also, Coutts, Montana

Ross McLeod <cdnrailmarine@...>
 

Frank - Try Glenbow Archives:
 
NA-2849-22
 
Construction of Imperial Oil Calgary Refinery, Ogden, Alberta - 1923
 
First shipment of crude from Coutts, originating in Montana, United States.
 
Ross McLeod Calgary
 


 


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WAYNE'S FEED hoppers

Fred Mullins
 

Folks,
I'm trying to figure out what type of hoppers this company used and painted for there company service. Did they have 2 bay or 3 bay hoppers and what color did they paint the cars yellow or red? If any one can direct me to photos of these cars that would be helpfull as well.
thanks
Fred Mullins


ADMIN: Christmas

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

OK, Guys,

As Tony Thompson says...the issue about being politically correct is WAY out of bounds for the STMFC.

On the STMFC, any name of a United States holiday is completely permissable IF it is associated with steam era frt cars....as would any other name not normally associated with steam era frt cars. Certainly Christmas was a national holiday during the steam era and the name is definitely usable on the STMFC IF it is associated with steam era frt cars. How some people view the name Christmas and other holidays such as Columbus Day { I mean...did he really discover the new world? } now is up to them and, while such views are their own business, any comments about the politically correctness of the term is completely out of scope on the STMFC and will be interpreted as a political statement [ not good ]. Reference to any other day of significance...say, my birthday...is also permitted IF it has an association with steam era frt cars.

Consider this message to be a warning of imminent jail time if ignored. The STMFC is NOT going to be a forum for discussing political issues.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: Another Gentle Abrasive Material

Charlie Vlk
 

For those of you who are thinking, "Great, but where the hell am I going to get walnut shells and what can I use to grind them into a uniform, small size?".......

They are sold in any fine Hobby Shop under the stealth label of "Woodland Scenics Ballast". Large (O Scale), Medium (HO) and Fine (N).

I don't know if the "Fine" size is small enough to work in blaster heads but at least it will give you a base material to use in your wife's (probably soon to be ex-) coffee grinder
or food processor.

Charlie Vlk


Re: Canadian tank cars south of 49; also, Coutts, Montana

bnsd45
 

Tim is correct that Coutts is in Alberta. It is on the Canadian Pacific side of the border with GN's route off of the "transcontinental" mainline from Shelby MT. It was - and still is - an active interchange between GN-CP (now BNSF-CP).

I'd bet that the tankcars were passing through Coutts enroute to US rails, coming from the Northern oilfields closer to Edmonton.

David Lehlbach

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Coutts is in Alberta; Sweetgrass MT is the other side of the border.
The route is Great Falls-->Shelby-->Calgary (GN+?) via Coutts/Sweetgrass.


Speaking of Coutts, MT, what road was that on, was it the GN? I'm not
clear on whether the photo I found of a whole string of Imperial Oil tank
cars there was delivering product or picking up crude, though I'd suspect
the latter.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC


Re: Grab Iron tool

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

John Stokes wrote:
It is really important to some people and not to others, which is one of those things great about America . . .
John, you are wandering WAY off list topic territory.


Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Grab Iron tool

Stokes John
 

It is really important to some people and not to others, which is one of those things great about America. You many be offended by something that I find amusing or inconsequential. Just remember in this context we are talking about an ancient pagan custom, not something invented by a new religion, and it was not even thought of by the new religion folks until a couple of hundred or so years ago, and not in the US first.

Putting up a Menorah at this time of year is still not an exactly popular proposition, or any other symbols of the non-"official" version of religion favored here.

What I miss is the multicolored lights, the trend to all white is boring.

John Stokes
Bellevue

To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
From: kpratt1937@msn.com
Date: Mon, 23 Nov 2009 13:51:44 -0700
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Grab Iron tool
































" The first you cut in the shape of a (politically incorrect term coming)

Christmas tree."

Reading this brought to mind Christmas of 1958, my new wife and I had just

moved to

Loa Angeles, CA in Sept. With Christmas coming up my cousin and her husband

asked

us if we wanted to ride along to the railroad yards to pick out each of us a

"Chanukah

Bush", that was the first time I heard that term.



K. Pratt



















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Re: Another Gentle Abrasive Material

jerryglow2
 

A friend in SoCal was an ammo reloader and used walnut shell in a vibrator to clean his brass (probably not recommended for our brass)

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

Another gentle abrasive material are pulverized walnut shells. I remember seeing a show about repairing and upgrading Army and Marine HUMVEE's and they were using this material to remove paint. I have seen them advertised or carried by someone, maybe Harbor Freight.

Interestingly such things as fountain pens nibs are polished by being tumbled in walnut shells.

Bill Welch


Re: NYC freight car lettering

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Nov 23, 2009, at 6:21 AM, Brian J Carlson wrote:

Al: I wasn't sure of the date the reporting marks changed so I
didn't want
to assume anything. Hopefully someone on here knows for sure.
Brian, the earliest photos I have of NYC cars with the extended
Gothic stenciling show two box cars with reweigh/repaint dates of BG
(Beech Grove) 6-55. They were taken by Will Whittaker on the West
Coast and George Sisk in Kansas City, and it's a good guess that what
prompted both photos of otherwise very ordinary NYC cars was that it
was the first time the photographers had seen the new lettering style.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Grab Iron tool

KP <kpratt1937@...>
 

" The first you cut in the shape of a (politically incorrect term coming) Christmas tree."
Reading this brought to mind Christmas of 1958, my new wife and I had just moved to
Loa Angeles, CA in Sept. With Christmas coming up my cousin and her husband asked
us if we wanted to ride along to the railroad yards to pick out each of us a "Chanukah
Bush", that was the first time I heard that term.

K. Pratt


Re: Grab Iron tool

Allen Cain <allencain@...>
 

I now recall that I used "V-Groove" siding to make my "branches" and did not
have to do any additional scribing but now that I think of it, it might not
be a bad idea for the most common sizes. Speaking of which, I ran a fine
point permanent marker running it through the most common sizes to make
them. You will have MANY more slots than you would typically use so some
trial and error is necessary to "zero in" on the "standard" sizes the first
time, or you can cheat and just lay a preformed grab in the slots until you
hit the right one.



I would recommend making this a "narrow and tall tree" which will give you
smaller increments in width as you go from slot to slot. You can add to the
number of increments by using the smaller slot spacing.



I just checked Walthers' site and a sheet of .020 V-Groove siding costs only
$5.49 versus $90 for a CNC manufactured tool and I know that you will have
more increments with the homemade tool.



Allen Cain


Re: Canadian tank cars south of 49; also, Coutts, Montana

Frank Valoczy <destron@...>
 

Thanks all for the clarification of the location of Coutts; I guess it`s
too much to expect of an Albertan archive to know what towns are in
Alberta. The photo shows the cars in a siding that appears to be a
loading-unloading dock; does anyone know where I might find more info
about Coutts-Sweetwater? (I`d have put a slash between the town names but
my laptop decided to change the keyboard layout...)

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

Tim O'Connor wrote:


Coutts is in Alberta; Sweetgrass MT is the other side of the border.
The route is Great Falls-->Shelby-->Calgary (GN+?) via Coutts/Sweetgrass.


Speaking of Coutts, MT, what road was that on, was it the GN? I'm not
clear on whether the photo I found of a whole string of Imperial Oil tank
cars there was delivering product or picking up crude, though I'd suspect
the latter.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC


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Another Gentle Abrasive Material

Bill Welch
 

Another gentle abrasive material are pulverized walnut shells. I remember seeing a show about repairing and upgrading Army and Marine HUMVEE's and they were using this material to remove paint. I have seen them advertised or carried by someone, maybe Harbor Freight.

Interestingly such things as fountain pens nibs are polished by being tumbled in walnut shells.

Bill Welch


Re: Canadian tank cars south of 49; also, Coutts, Montana

Tim O'Connor
 

Coutts is in Alberta; Sweetgrass MT is the other side of the border.
The route is Great Falls-->Shelby-->Calgary (GN+?) via Coutts/Sweetgrass.

Speaking of Coutts, MT, what road was that on, was it the GN? I'm not
clear on whether the photo I found of a whole string of Imperial Oil tank
cars there was delivering product or picking up crude, though I'd suspect
the latter.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC


Small Screws was IM 70T Flat

rdgbuff56
 

The best place I found for small screws is Micro-Fasteners.com
Check out their on-line catalog.

I have two of their original kits for this car. I remember I put them back in storage because I didn't know exactly where and which way to place the tie-downs. I think that what they were called. I couldn't find a drawing in the instructions I had. Does someone have a good photo?

Francis A. Pehowic, Jr. in Sunbury, Pa.




________________________________
From: Andy <eandyjr1@verizon.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Mon, November 23, 2009 9:37:40 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: InterMountain 70 ton flat car kits




--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@ ...> wrote:

On Nov 22, 2009, at 10:05 AM, William Keene wrote:

I have not seen the 70-ton flat cars yet. What is the method of
installing the couplers on these cars. The experience I had with the
IM reefers with the press fit coupler box cover resulted in removal
of the entire box and installation of new boxes to install the
Sergent couplers. Hopefully the flat car uses some other method than
the press fit coupler box cover.
Bill, the coupler box covers on the IM flat cars are neatly held in
place by small flat head screws.


Richard Hendrickson
Have been using a countersink to make 2-56 flat head screws fit flush on the cover. Also tap the old pin hole for 2-56s. BTW McMaster-Carr & others are a good source for small screws at much better prices than your LHS.



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Christmas tree shipments - was Grab Iron tool

Robert kirkham
 

They were also shipped in box car loads. Around here, the arrival of the first load of the year was even announced in the press as heralding the Christmas season. I've occasionally thought it would be fun to model one of those events at the station in wet Vancouver with Christmas decor starting to show in the town, but the technological challenges of doing so in HO make it difficult, and the quirky unusualness about such a scene make it something I wouldn't touch except as a diorama.

Rob Kirkham
Surrey, B.C.

--------------------------------------------------
From: "steve l" <stevelucas3@yahoo.ca>
Sent: Monday, November 23, 2009 7:53 AM
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re:Grab Iron tool
[snip] in STMFC days, shipped in gondola cars to major cities. An interesting load to model, indeed!
[snip]

Steve Lucas.


Re: Coutts, Alberta (was: Canadian tank cars south of 49)

Ross McLeod <cdnrailmarine@...>
 

Frank - what you may find interesting is that inaddition to CPR traffic interchanged to GN at Coutts/Sweetgrass you will also find CNR traffic (Edmonton...) traffic interchanged to CPR Calgary for GN Sweetgrass.Ross McLeod Calgary

Speaking of Coutts, MT, what road was that on, was it the GN? I'm not
clear on whether the photo I found of a whole string of Imperial Oil tank
cars there was delivering product or picking up crude, though I'd suspect
the latter.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC












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Re: Grab Iron tool

steve l <stevelucas3@...>
 

Jerry--

He's taking a litle poke at poltical correctness. Even Ben Stein has opined on "Christmas" trees in a well-put article. Christmas trees, BTW, were, in STMFC days, shipped in gondola cars to major cities. An interesting load to model, indeed!

As for the grab iron tool, seems to me that Bob Hundman described it in a Mainline article on scratchbuilding an ATSF stock car.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, asychis@... wrote:

"The first you cut in the shape of a (politically incorrect term coming)
Christmas
tree."

Do we really need these sort of comments?

Jerry Michels


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Coutts, Alberta (was: Canadian tank cars south of 49)

al_brown03
 

Coutts, Alberta, is a twin town with Sweetgrass, Montana. It's a significant port of entry to this day. The local railroad is a GN branch that comes up from Virden, just west of Shelby; I don't know where it goes on the Canadian side.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Valoczy" <destron@...> wrote:

<snip>
Speaking of Coutts, MT, what road was that on, was it the GN? I'm not
clear on whether the photo I found of a whole string of Imperial Oil tank
cars there was delivering product or picking up crude, though I'd suspect
the latter.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC


Re: IC Box Car Color

Rich C
 

I know a late reply, cleaning up my Yahoo folder, but anyhow the RPC #1 by Ed Hawkins suggests Floquil #110179 Mineral Brown. Underframe and Trucks were black.
 
Rich C

--- On Sat, 5/9/09, John Golden <golden1014@yahoo.com> wrote:


From: John Golden <golden1014@yahoo.com>
Subject: [STMFC] IC Box Car Color
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Saturday, May 9, 2009, 9:13 PM








Gentlemen,

I'm finishing one of the F&C HO scale IC single sheathed box cars, and I could use some help on the color. Does anyone have any suggestions? Brown? Oxide? Red? A mix? Color of underframe and trucks? Thanks.

John

John Golden
Bloomington, IN



















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