Date   

Re: Wilson reefer (bogus?)

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

Gene,
Quit wasting your time looking at toy trains on ebay and start building some of the prototype models you have : )))

Clark


Re: Modifying Con-Cor USRA Box Car

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

I know nothing about this old kit. Why not just buy and build the Westerfield model? If they make one for your road.

There is a problem with the doors. I just finished modifying several Ertl models for various M&StL cars. I noticed that the original door was top hung with 5 or 6 guide brackets along the frame. Other cars, maybe clones, had a bottom door track with two (roller?) brackets attached the door at the bottom,

The angle brace across the door is in different positions on the two doors. The USRA door has is 2/3 to 3/4 the way down, while the other door, like Tichy's is in the middle.

To complicate things, some cars had the angle brace low like the USRA design, but had the lower door track and door rollers.

Bottom line: You need to have a photo of the prototype and use whatever parts are available to build a model that matches. Back to my question, "Why not just use the Westerfield car?"

Clark Propst


Re: Wilson reefer (bogus?)

Tim O'Connor
 

Gene

I think Richard is being too kind... it looks like a piece of
fantasy junk to me. However, it did lead me to find out that Wilson
also started Wilson's sporting goods company, and both companies were
enormously successful...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_E._Wilson

Tim O'Connor

Please see eBay item #290293823411 HO Wilson Car Lines WCLX 8350
Box Car Item #509 j.

Is the paint scheme bogus or is there some basis in reality?
Gene, it's hard to say with certainty that it's bogus, but I have 20
or so photos of Wilson cars dating from the 1920s through the 1960s,
and none show a car that looks remotely like that.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Wilson reefer (bogus?)

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Dec 29, 2009, at 5:45 PM, Gene wrote:

Please see eBay item #290293823411 HO Wilson Car Lines WCLX 8350
Box Car Item #509 j.

Is the paint scheme bogus or is there some basis in reality?
Gene, it's hard to say with certainty that it's bogus, but I have 20
or so photos of Wilson cars dating from the 1920s through the 1960s,
and none show a car that looks remotely like that.

Richard Hendrickson


Western Fruit Express Paint Scheme Variation

gary laakso
 

Great Northern Railway in the Pacific Northwest on page 78 has an overhead view of the GN yard at Whitefish, Montana (in the early 1940s) that includes 2 nearby WFEX wood reefers. Only the last 4 digits on one of the cars is visible: 2238; my guess would be that the car is the 60001-63910 series. Both reefers have black ice hatches and the curved bars that the hatches fall back upon when open are similarly black. I can now do an additional WFEX painting scheme.
An additional variation in the picture is an insulated tank car with a valve hose connection at the top of the tank next to the dome. Lastly, there is a very worn looking B&O M-15 boxcar in the yard. The only coal in the picture is contained in a CB&Q gondola.


gary laakso
south of Mike Brock
vasa0vasa@earthlink.net


Wilson reefer (bogus?)

Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

Please see eBay item #290293823411 HO Wilson Car Lines WCLX 8350 Box Car Item #509 j.

Is the paint scheme bogus or is there some basis in reality?

Gene Green
New Mexico


Re: Arch bar trucks.....

D. Scott Chatfield
 

I'd have two questions: when were arch bar trucks banned from
interchange in the US . . .
and Mind-Like-A-Steel-Trap Thompson wrote:

I've finally memorized this one, since we cover it every six
months or so: 1941.
And I tracked down the AAR Field Guides to Interchange Rules for 1941 and 1942, and after several deferments the final date was August 1941.


Re: express reefers loading/unloading

Tim O'Connor
 

Thanks, this is all very interesting. So where were the StLB&M express
reefers out of the Rio Grande Valley handed over to passenger trains? Or
did passenger trains stop and pick them up directly, like at Fullerton CA?

I remember open produce sheds in Texas... was born in San Antonio and have
been back many times since. There were some large galvanized steel sheds in
town too.

Tim O'Connor

Tim -

In the limited example of shipping of grapefruit baskets from the Rio Grande Valley of south Texas to the New York area at Christmas, the express reefers were loaded at dedicated produce shipping sheds and handled in freight trains with other freight reefers. The express reefers were only used for the fruit baskets - they were not shipped in freight reefers. Most of this traffic was handled by ART over the MoPac (StLB&M). Ralph H. Carlson, a prolific steam-era photographer and railfan, told me this on a visit to Harlingen back in 1983. We visited several of the area shipping sheds that remained - they were all open-air, since the weather is very mild there (unlike here in San Antonio today).

Happy New Year!

A.T. Kott

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

For unloading, that makes sense. What about loading? I've seen
photos/videos of trains with many express reefers. Were they
handled by local passenger trains like the cream/butter business,
or by freights, and then later consolidated for long haul on
mail/passenger trains?

Tim O'Connor


Re: Modifying Con-Cor USRA Box Car

Tim O'Connor
 

Has anyone applied these ends to the Accurail USRA DS box car?
I'm curious if it matches the dimensions of that kit... Might be
useful as an upgrade.

Tim O'Connor

Jerry Glow wrote:
"NOT TRUE if you get the right ones. Bill Gould made the 5-5-5 ends for a DS car long before the SS car came around. The ends ARE different."

Good point; however, it would have helped out the original poster more if you had noted the specific part to avoid confusion.

BTW, the end for the USRA DS boxcar is Tichy #3001:
http://tinyurl.com/yhnekhe

To clarify, there are two options for Riley's project - Tichy #3001, or Westerfield #3822.


Ben Hom


Re: Coal in the Pacific Northwest

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Dec 28, 2009, at 7:56 PM, leakinmywaders wrote:

I too was content to let this pass, but since you took one more
kick at this: My post was not incorrect (nor so car as I can tell
were most of the others on list). Though irrelevant to the
original question, it was certainly relevant to a sweeping
statement you made about commercial mining of coal in Oregon.
My statement was a response to another post, and in that context it
was specifically about the late steam/early diesel era. For that
era, my "sweeping statement" was entirely correct. I have no quarrel
with those who, as you did, wanted to point out that there was, in
fact, small scale coal mining in Oregon at an earlier period.

It was not my intent to nitpick, but only to ensure one small
historical fact was not forgotten in the rush to generalize.....
Any implication that my post contradicted the main thrust of your
original message was a long stretch meant to be tongue in cheek. I
thought I made that fairly plain, but if not, let it be plain now.
That was my take on it, and my negative remarks were not directed at
you. Apart from the flak I got on the list, I also received a couple
of really rude off-list messages to the effect that as I obviously
didn't know the first thing about coal in the Pacific Northwest, I
should shut up about that topic (and, by implication, other topics in
general). So perhaps you can understand why I was pleased when the
data posted by Dave Nelson largely confirmed what I had written in
what was an offhand response to someone else's post about coal
traffic to/from Oregon. It was never my intention to stir up an
anthill.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: express reefers loading/unloading

Mark
 

Hello
Lived in San Antonio as a kid(when pres K was shot), what is the weather like down there? We have 3" of snow with 25 degrees and wind from the north. Missed the trains down there but remember the ACL E-6 my dad raced to beat!
Sincerely, Mark Morgan

--- On Tue, 12/29/09, proto48er <atkott@swbell.net> wrote:

From: proto48er <atkott@swbell.net>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: express reefers loading/unloading
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, December 29, 2009, 4:19 PM
















 









Tim -



In the limited example of shipping of grapefruit baskets from the Rio Grande Valley of south Texas to the New York area at Christmas, the express reefers were loaded at dedicated produce shipping sheds and handled in freight trains with other freight reefers. The express reefers were only used for the fruit baskets - they were not shipped in freight reefers. Most of this traffic was handled by ART over the MoPac (StLB&M). Ralph H. Carlson, a prolific steam-era photographer and railfan, told me this on a visit to Harlingen back in 1983. We visited several of the area shipping sheds that remained - they were all open-air, since the weather is very mild there (unlike here in San Antonio today).



Happy New Year!



A.T. Kott



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@ ...> wrote:

For unloading, that makes sense. What about loading? I've seen
photos/videos of trains with many express reefers. Were they
handled by local passenger trains like the cream/butter business,
or by freights, and then later consolidated for long haul on
mail/passenger trains?
Tim O'Connor


Re: express reefers loading/unloading

proto48er
 

Tim -

In the limited example of shipping of grapefruit baskets from the Rio Grande Valley of south Texas to the New York area at Christmas, the express reefers were loaded at dedicated produce shipping sheds and handled in freight trains with other freight reefers. The express reefers were only used for the fruit baskets - they were not shipped in freight reefers. Most of this traffic was handled by ART over the MoPac (StLB&M). Ralph H. Carlson, a prolific steam-era photographer and railfan, told me this on a visit to Harlingen back in 1983. We visited several of the area shipping sheds that remained - they were all open-air, since the weather is very mild there (unlike here in San Antonio today).

Happy New Year!

A.T. Kott

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

For unloading, that makes sense. What about loading? I've seen
photos/videos of trains with many express reefers. Were they
handled by local passenger trains like the cream/butter business,
or by freights, and then later consolidated for long haul on
mail/passenger trains?

Tim O'Connor


Re: B&O Wagon Tob Boxcars

proto48er
 

Gary -

The car you mentioned is a B&O Class M-53, but is totally devoid of its underframe. It has been on the ground in Macdona for at least 35 years. If you search this list, there have been several posts and links to a series of excellent underframe photos for this class of cars. The excellent article in the RPC is a good starting point. I have not been to the site for several years, but it used to have an older ART steel reefer and an AT&SF rebuilt USRA boxcar for company. Are they still there?

A.T. Kott


Re: Wilson reefer (bogus?)

Charles Hladik
 

Gene,
It's not one that I have seen or am aware of. Car looks like a Tyco or
maybe Mehano or such. Cast grabs etc.
Chuck Hladik

In a message dated 12/29/2009 8:45:44 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
bierglaeser@yahoo.com writes:




Please see eBay item #290293823411 HO Wilson Car Lines WCLX 8350 Box Car
Item #509 j.

Is the paint scheme bogus or is there some basis in reality?

Gene Green
New Mexico





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Airbrush Help

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Dec 28, 2009, at 8:12 PM, leakinmywaders wrote:

Richard: I have a very basic, first-generation Aztek that I've
painted with for about ten years. I'm fine with it-- it does what
I need it too, and with easy cleanup and minimum fuss. I very
seldom get clogs with acrylic paints if I use a metal mesh filter
in the intake tube, and keep the nozzle wet with a shot of Windex
any time I set the bush down for a few minutes. But I do keep a
second acrylic nozzle on hand for those occasions when clogs
happen. In the event of persistent clogs, I have always been able
to unclog the nozzles with a simple overnight solvent soak.

I can't recall getting a clog more than once or twice with slower-
drying laquer-based paints like Scalecoat. I'm still painting
those with the original nozzle.
Thanks, Chris. That's very helpful, as I have now been offered an
older but little used Aztek for free. I'm obviously going to have to
learn some somewhat different procedures than with my Badger. I'll
see how it goes.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: express reefers loading/unloading

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Dec 29, 2009, at 12:26 AM, michael bishop wrote:

I have been told by some older Santa Fe men (and this was thirty years ago) that the East bound Grand Canyon would pick up two or three REA reefers in Fullerton, Ca during the Strawberry season for back east. I have seen photos of the Grand Canyon during the strawberry season with REA reefers, if they were picked up in Fullerton I do not know. I have had fun doing this move over the years with my east bound Grand Canyon.
This was a well established routine at the beginning of the strawberry season, and I saw it done in the late 1940s. A local freight would spot the cars, already iced, on the Fullerton house track for loading. The eastbound Grand Canyon had a station stop at Fullerton anyway, so they would back the entire train into the house track to collect the loaded express reefers on the tail end and take them to San Bernardino, where a longer station stop provided time for the San Berdo switcher to shift them to the head end. That way, they didn't have to mess with the steam heat connections at Fullerton, just hook up the air and go. The backing move to pick up the cars with a long train and a big 4-8-2 or 4-8-4 passenger locomotive was not popular with engine and train crews, but it was done that way for years with, so far as I know, no mishaps.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: express reefers loading/unloading

railwayman <stevelucas3@...>
 

Many local passenger trains lifted and set off express cars behind the coaches. It's easier to move the markers back and do up an air hose than to disconnect and re-connect steam pipe and air signal lines as well. Especially when wearing a passenger trainman's uniform and trying not to soil it.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Tim O'Connor wrote:
For unloading, that makes sense. What about loading? I've seen
photos/videos of trains with many express reefers. Were they handled
by local passenger trains like the cream/butter business,or by
freights, and then later consolidated for long haul on mail/
passenger trains?
Good point. I'd guess it would depend on the local
circumstances, for example how easy a pickup by a passenger train
would be. Certainly no one is going to park a passenger while the
locomotive wanders off to an industrial siding somewhere. There's an
example cited in the PFE book of strawberries in express reefers, with
cars timed to complete loading and be picked up and taken straight to
the main line by the normal local freight, to meet a passenger train.
Other situations would require other solutions.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Steel Mill Railroads from Morning Side Books

Norman+Laraine Larkin <lono@...>
 

I spoke with Morning Sun Books today about the book. It is primarily a photo essay on the industry from the 1960s-1980s with emphasis on the 70s. The main subject is motive power, but there is a lot of background physical plant info and a lot of rolling stock pics. Unfortunately, it is more modern than the List's time frame. However, I would guess that the plant, mill rolling stock and some motive power photos relate back to the 50s.
Norm Larkin

----- Original Message -----
From: "Allen Cain" <allencain@tampabay.rr.com>
To: "Steam Era Freight Car Discussion Group" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, December 28, 2009 11:56 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Steel Mill Railroads from Morning Side Books


Would anyone who has this recently published book comment on coverage of
steam era or transition era freight cars, operations and roads?



I am interested in it but only if it has a decent amount of material for the
period covered by this group and in particular the early 1950s.



Thanks,



Allen Cain






------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: Modifying Con-Cor USRA Box Car

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Jerry Glow wrote:
"NOT TRUE if you get the right ones. Bill Gould made the 5-5-5 ends for a DS car long before the SS car came around. The ends ARE different."

Good point; however, it would have helped out the original poster more if you had noted the specific part to avoid confusion.

BTW, the end for the USRA DS boxcar is Tichy #3001:
http://tinyurl.com/yhnekhe

To clarify, there are two options for Riley's project - Tichy #3001, or Westerfield #3822.


Ben Hom


Re: Modifying Con-Cor USRA Box Car

jerryglow2
 

NOT TRUE if you get the right ones. Bill Gould made the 5-5-5 ends for a DS car long before the SS car came around. The ends ARE different.

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "benjaminfrank_hom" <b.hom@...> wrote:

Jerry Glow responded:
"Good choice for the doors and I'd use their ends also. I'm familiar with the kit (might still have an unbuilt one) and scratch built one using the new Gould (at the time) ends following a Bob Hundman article in Mainline Modeler."

Be advised that the Tichy ends are from their USRA SS boxcar kit, which if used as is will be too narrow for the DS boxcar. You'll need to splice two ends together and rework the roof pitch to get the correct width.

A better alternative would be to use Westerfield #3822, which IS intended for the USRA DS boxcar:
http://www.westerfield.biz/detail_parts_80318.htm

Scroll down 3/4 of the way down the page for the part in question.


Ben Hom

94581 - 94600 of 182100