Date   

Re: Santa Fe Bx3/6 Brake wheels & gear

Al and Patricia Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

Rick - Yes, That's our kit 3651. - Al Westerfield

----- Original Message -----
From: rdietrichson
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, January 05, 2010 4:32 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Santa Fe Bx3/6 Brake wheels & gear



Hey everyone,
Did any of the Santa Fe's Bx-3/6's get modernized with AB brake systems, and horizontal brake wheels, or did they remain as built .
with vertical brake shafts?
Thanks for any help.
Rick Dietrichson
Wilmington, NC


Santa Fe Bx3/6 Brake wheels & gear

rdietrichson
 

Hey everyone,
Did any of the Santa Fe's Bx-3/6's get modernized with AB brake systems, and horizontal brake wheels, or did they remain as built .
with vertical brake shafts?
Thanks for any help.
Rick Dietrichson
Wilmington, NC


Re: Barrel Crates - How Common Were These?

Bill Welch
 

Yes, I plan to thoroughly overwhelm and bore people with information about the produce shipping containers, various methods of loading them into freight refrigerator cars, and the colourful labels applied to most crates to seduce/attract the buyers at the various terminal markets.

One of the things people will find interesting, I think, will be that while there were standard containers used, these containers varied across the different regions of the country. For example oranges shipped from California were in a crate somewhat different from oranges shipped from Florida. I am not sure about Texas as yet. Some items shipped in bags from one part of the country and in barrels from another.

Also things changed over time as a result of materials, research and experiments. The USDA was very involved in research to minimize damage and maximize the viability of perishables in transit to the wholesale markets.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, water.kresse@... wrote:



Bill,



Hopefully, these various types of crates and their produce shipped in them will find their way into your box also?  I'm so ready to leave this "wonderful warm weather" up here in Michigan . . . if I could.



Al Kresse


----- Original Message -----
From: "feddersenmark" <feddersenmark@...>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, January 4, 2010 11:23:13 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Barrel Crates - How Common Were These?

In addition to working for DuPont in Clinton, Iowa, my father ran a one man insurance agency out of a desk in our dining room for Union Insurance Co. of Lincoln, Nebraska. Every summer for several years in the early 50's, the president of the company would send a gift of about a dozen cantaloupe, presumedly grown near Lincoln, boxed in a crate made of slats about 5" x 1/4" nailed to a 3/4" x whatever top and bottom and re-enforced with wire. They were delivered to our door by the REA and arrived in good condition. I don't know how they were routed from Lincoln to Clinton, but I assume (I know) it was via passenger train (UP/C&NW) in an express car. I always looked forward to their arrival as they were the best. Mark Feddersen




--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "lnbill" <fgexbill@> wrote:

Although the caption characterizes these as barrels, they are really more like cylindrical crates with slates to promote contact with cool air. I have accumulated several resources related to various forms of shipping containers for produce related to researching the FGE/WFE/BRE companies. What most of us would call and recognize as barrels were used to ship potatoes and apples. Most citrus was shipped in rectangular crates which one publication called simply "Orange and Grapefruit boxes."

Many crops required specifically designed shipping containers while potatoes, for example was also loaded in bulk into reefers and in paper or burlap bags. Peaches moved in specially designed baskets while asparagus were shipped in a box that was shaped like a trapezoid the given vegetables  shape once they were bundled and tied together.

Attendees at Cocoa Beach will get a little taste of containers in my presentation there (shameless self-promotion).

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Nolan Hinshaw <cearnog@> wrote:

On Jan 3, 2010, at 12:15 PM, Bob C wrote:

This image is from the Tampa-Hillsborough County Public Library's  
Burgert Brothers Photographic Archives.  The caption reads, "Barrel  
crates of Pinellas County citrus fruit loaded in boxcar for  
shipment: Elfers, Fla. The date is 1931.  (I believe the "boxcar"  
is actually a reefer.)

http://digital.hcplc.org/burgert/archive09/8263.jpg

I have never seen barrel crates before.  Were these very common?
Idunno, but I really appreciated an image illustrating hexagonal
closest packing of circles. Meanwhile the imagination runs rampant
with possibilities for a project I'm working on.
--
Nolan Hinshaw, native Californian since 1944
"[Vista is] about as stable as a one-legged elephant on a skateboard"
C. Daniels





Re: Barrel Crates - How Common Were These?

water.kresse@...
 

Bill,



Hopefully, these various types of crates and their produce shipped in them will find their way into your box also?  I'm so ready to leave this "wonderful warm weather" up here in Michigan . . . if I could.



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----
From: "feddersenmark" <feddersenmark@yahoo.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, January 4, 2010 11:23:13 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Barrel Crates - How Common Were These?

In addition to working for DuPont in Clinton, Iowa, my father ran a one man insurance agency out of a desk in our dining room for Union Insurance Co. of Lincoln, Nebraska. Every summer for several years in the early 50's, the president of the company would send a gift of about a dozen cantaloupe, presumedly grown near Lincoln, boxed in a crate made of slats about 5" x 1/4" nailed to a 3/4" x whatever top and bottom and re-enforced with wire. They were delivered to our door by the REA and arrived in good condition. I don't know how they were routed from Lincoln to Clinton, but I assume (I know) it was via passenger train (UP/C&NW) in an express car. I always looked forward to their arrival as they were the best. Mark Feddersen




--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

Although the caption characterizes these as barrels, they are really more like cylindrical crates with slates to promote contact with cool air. I have accumulated several resources related to various forms of shipping containers for produce related to researching the FGE/WFE/BRE companies. What most of us would call and recognize as barrels were used to ship potatoes and apples. Most citrus was shipped in rectangular crates which one publication called simply "Orange and Grapefruit boxes."

Many crops required specifically designed shipping containers while potatoes, for example was also loaded in bulk into reefers and in paper or burlap bags. Peaches moved in specially designed baskets while asparagus were shipped in a box that was shaped like a trapezoid the given vegetables  shape once they were bundled and tied together.

Attendees at Cocoa Beach will get a little taste of containers in my presentation there (shameless self-promotion).

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Nolan Hinshaw <cearnog@> wrote:

On Jan 3, 2010, at 12:15 PM, Bob C wrote:

This image is from the Tampa-Hillsborough County Public Library's  
Burgert Brothers Photographic Archives.  The caption reads, "Barrel  
crates of Pinellas County citrus fruit loaded in boxcar for  
shipment: Elfers, Fla. The date is 1931.  (I believe the "boxcar"  
is actually a reefer.)

http://digital.hcplc.org/burgert/archive09/8263.jpg

I have never seen barrel crates before.  Were these very common?
Idunno, but I really appreciated an image illustrating hexagonal
closest packing of circles. Meanwhile the imagination runs rampant
with possibilities for a project I'm working on.
--
Nolan Hinshaw, native Californian since 1944
"[Vista is] about as stable as a one-legged elephant on a skateboard"
C. Daniels



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Barrel Crates - How Common Were These?

water.kresse@...
 

I believe a "reefer" is an insulated refrig'd box car?



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----
From: "feddersenmark" <feddersenmark@yahoo.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, January 4, 2010 11:23:13 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Barrel Crates - How Common Were These?

In addition to working for DuPont in Clinton, Iowa, my father ran a one man insurance agency out of a desk in our dining room for Union Insurance Co. of Lincoln, Nebraska. Every summer for several years in the early 50's, the president of the company would send a gift of about a dozen cantaloupe, presumedly grown near Lincoln, boxed in a crate made of slats about 5" x 1/4" nailed to a 3/4" x whatever top and bottom and re-enforced with wire. They were delivered to our door by the REA and arrived in good condition. I don't know how they were routed from Lincoln to Clinton, but I assume (I know) it was via passenger train (UP/C&NW) in an express car. I always looked forward to their arrival as they were the best. Mark Feddersen




--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

Although the caption characterizes these as barrels, they are really more like cylindrical crates with slates to promote contact with cool air. I have accumulated several resources related to various forms of shipping containers for produce related to researching the FGE/WFE/BRE companies. What most of us would call and recognize as barrels were used to ship potatoes and apples. Most citrus was shipped in rectangular crates which one publication called simply "Orange and Grapefruit boxes."

Many crops required specifically designed shipping containers while potatoes, for example was also loaded in bulk into reefers and in paper or burlap bags. Peaches moved in specially designed baskets while asparagus were shipped in a box that was shaped like a trapezoid the given vegetables  shape once they were bundled and tied together.

Attendees at Cocoa Beach will get a little taste of containers in my presentation there (shameless self-promotion).

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Nolan Hinshaw <cearnog@> wrote:

On Jan 3, 2010, at 12:15 PM, Bob C wrote:

This image is from the Tampa-Hillsborough County Public Library's  
Burgert Brothers Photographic Archives.  The caption reads, "Barrel  
crates of Pinellas County citrus fruit loaded in boxcar for  
shipment: Elfers, Fla. The date is 1931.  (I believe the "boxcar"  
is actually a reefer.)

http://digital.hcplc.org/burgert/archive09/8263.jpg

I have never seen barrel crates before.  Were these very common?
Idunno, but I really appreciated an image illustrating hexagonal
closest packing of circles. Meanwhile the imagination runs rampant
with possibilities for a project I'm working on.
--
Nolan Hinshaw, native Californian since 1944
"[Vista is] about as stable as a one-legged elephant on a skateboard"
C. Daniels



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Martin Lofton Status

Rhbale@...
 

In an update last night I learned that Martin's doctors have delayed the
surgery originally scheduled for late December. No firm date has been set
but presumably it will be within the next several days. Meanwhile, Martin is
resting at home and is brainstorming with Tricia on ways to get some
production started without his involvement.

Martin's illness is serious and should serve as a reminder to all of us to
put the macho-man attitude aside and see a doctor regularly.

Richard Bale
Carlsbad CA

In a message dated 1/5/2010 1:40:57 A.M. Pacific Standard Time,
tmolsen@UDel.Edu writes:




Ed and Group,

Has anyone heard how Martin has fared since Ed's last report?

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
_tmolsen@udel.tmo_ (mailto:tmolsen@udel.edu)

P.S. Sorry about the previous post, got my fingers crossed up on the
keyboard when attempting to send this post!






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: CNW/CMO Slogan Boxcars

jerryglow2
 

My friend is a CNW modeler convert from narrow gauge interests so to encourage him, I've done artwork for decals for CNW cars for the late steam/early diesel era (although many survived much later in original paint and lettering). You can see 3 on my site at:
<http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/modeling/>

inquiries and info off line please
Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "fltenwheeler" <floridatenwheeler@...> wrote:

Hi

I am looking for information on CNW/CMO slogan boxcars. So far this is what I have found.

April 1976 North Western Lines

April 1981 North Western Lines by Fred Hartwig

Summer 1983 North Western Lines by Clem Devine

December 1986 Prototype Modeler by Lloyd Rinehart

Fall 1996 North Western Lines by Jeff Koeller

Railway Prototype Cyclopedia volume 1 by Pat Wider and Ed Hawkins
_____________________________________________________

The early 1937 slogans. From what I can tell theses slogans were used on both sides of the car.

CMO's ROUTE OF THE 400

CNW's ROUTE OF THE 400 AND THE STREAMLINERS and later changed to just ROUTE OF THE 400
_____________________________________________________

And 5 slogans that started in 1944

THE OVERLAND ROUTE

ROUTE OF THE 400 FLEET

ROUTE OF THE 400 STREAMLINERS

ROUTE OF THE CHALLENGERS

ROUTE OF THE STREAMLINERS
_____________________________________________________


Thanks for any help.

Tim


Re: Martin Lofton Status

tmolsen@...
 

Ed and Group,

Has anyone heard how Martin has fared since Ed's last report?

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@udel.edu

P.S. Sorry about the previous post, got my fingers crossed up on the keyboard when attempting to send this post!


Re: Martin Lofton Status

tmolsen@...
 


Re: Barrel Crates - How Common Were These?

feddersenmark
 

In addition to working for DuPont in Clinton, Iowa, my father ran a one man insurance agency out of a desk in our dining room for Union Insurance Co. of Lincoln, Nebraska. Every summer for several years in the early 50's, the president of the company would send a gift of about a dozen cantaloupe, presumedly grown near Lincoln, boxed in a crate made of slats about 5" x 1/4" nailed to a 3/4" x whatever top and bottom and re-enforced with wire. They were delivered to our door by the REA and arrived in good condition. I don't know how they were routed from Lincoln to Clinton, but I assume (I know) it was via passenger train (UP/C&NW) in an express car. I always looked forward to their arrival as they were the best. Mark Feddersen

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

Although the caption characterizes these as barrels, they are really more like cylindrical crates with slates to promote contact with cool air. I have accumulated several resources related to various forms of shipping containers for produce related to researching the FGE/WFE/BRE companies. What most of us would call and recognize as barrels were used to ship potatoes and apples. Most citrus was shipped in rectangular crates which one publication called simply "Orange and Grapefruit boxes."

Many crops required specifically designed shipping containers while potatoes, for example was also loaded in bulk into reefers and in paper or burlap bags. Peaches moved in specially designed baskets while asparagus were shipped in a box that was shaped like a trapezoid the given vegetables shape once they were bundled and tied together.

Attendees at Cocoa Beach will get a little taste of containers in my presentation there (shameless self-promotion).

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Nolan Hinshaw <cearnog@> wrote:

On Jan 3, 2010, at 12:15 PM, Bob C wrote:

This image is from the Tampa-Hillsborough County Public Library's
Burgert Brothers Photographic Archives. The caption reads, "Barrel
crates of Pinellas County citrus fruit loaded in boxcar for
shipment: Elfers, Fla. The date is 1931. (I believe the "boxcar"
is actually a reefer.)

http://digital.hcplc.org/burgert/archive09/8263.jpg

I have never seen barrel crates before. Were these very common?
Idunno, but I really appreciated an image illustrating hexagonal
closest packing of circles. Meanwhile the imagination runs rampant
with possibilities for a project I'm working on.
--
Nolan Hinshaw, native Californian since 1944
"[Vista is] about as stable as a one-legged elephant on a skateboard"
C. Daniels


Re: Arch bar trucks.....

bob_karig <karig@...>
 

With the help of Bill Kelly, I've put together the following sequence of events regarding the prohibition of arch bar trucks in interchange. This information is assembled Rule 3, Section (t) of the Code of Rules Governing the Condition of, and Repairs to, Freight and Passenger Cars for the Interchange of Traffic adopted by the Association of American Railroads for the years indicated.

1931: 3 (t) (3) "Trucks, with arch bars, prohibited, effective January 1, 1936, under all cars. From owners."

1936: 3 (t) (4) "Trucks, with arch bars, prohibited, effective January 1, 1938, under all cars. From owners."

1938, Supplement 2, 3 (t) (4): Effective date of prohibition extended to January 1, 1939

1939: 3 (t) (4) "Trucks, with arch bars, prohibited, effective July 1, 1939, under all cars. From owners."

1940: 3 (t) (4) "Trucks, with arch bars, prohibited, on and after January 1, 1940. From owners."

1940, Supplement 1: Effective July 1, 1940, "(t) (4) Trucks, with arch bars, prohibited under all cars. In
interchange."

1940, Supplement 2, dated July 1940: 3 (t) (4) "Trucks, with arch bars, prohibited under all cars. In interchange."

Note—The movement of cars equipped with arch bar trucks must be confined to owner's rails, except that they are acceptable in interchange from owner for loading or for unloading within the same terminal switching district in which the interchange occurs, providing that no road haul is involved in such movement, and providing that cars so interchanged will be immediately returned to owner's rails when loading or unloading is accomplished.
Cars equipped with arch bar trucks are acceptable for movement between plants located in the same switching district, providing no road haul is involved.
Locomotive cranes, locomotive tenders and derricks, built prior to January 1, 1940 and equipped with arch bar trucks, may be accepted in interchange or from owners prior to January 1, 1941, and moved under such controlled speeds as may be required by handling railroad. Effective January 1, 1941, such equipment will be prohibited in interchange. (This paragraph does not apply to contractors' work equipment other than mentioned above.)

1941: 3 (t) (4) "Trucks, with arch bars, prohibited under all cars, locomotive cranes, locomotive tenders and derricks. In interchange."

Note: The movement of cars equipped with arch bar trucks must be confined to owner's rails, except that they are acceptable in interchange form owner for loading or for unloading within the same terminal switching district in which the interchange occurs, providing that no road haul is involved in such movement, and providing that cars so interchanges will be immediately returned to owners rails when loading or unloading is accomplished.
Cars equipped with arch bar trucks are acceptable for movement between plants located in the same switching district, providing no road haul is involved.

1942-1960: 3 (t) (4) "Trucks, with arch bars, prohibited under all cars, locomotive cranes, locomotive tenders and derricks. In interchange." Minor changes in note with regard to handling cars within switching districts at international border points..

I have also posted this information as a pdf in the file section under the title "Arch Bar History."

Bob Karig


Re: Barrel Crates - How Common Were These?

Bill Welch
 

Although the caption characterizes these as barrels, they are really more like cylindrical crates with slates to promote contact with cool air. I have accumulated several resources related to various forms of shipping containers for produce related to researching the FGE/WFE/BRE companies. What most of us would call and recognize as barrels were used to ship potatoes and apples. Most citrus was shipped in rectangular crates which one publication called simply "Orange and Grapefruit boxes."

Many crops required specifically designed shipping containers while potatoes, for example was also loaded in bulk into reefers and in paper or burlap bags. Peaches moved in specially designed baskets while asparagus were shipped in a box that was shaped like a trapezoid the given vegetables shape once they were bundled and tied together.

Attendees at Cocoa Beach will get a little taste of containers in my presentation there (shameless self-promotion).

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Nolan Hinshaw <cearnog@...> wrote:

On Jan 3, 2010, at 12:15 PM, Bob C wrote:

This image is from the Tampa-Hillsborough County Public Library's
Burgert Brothers Photographic Archives. The caption reads, "Barrel
crates of Pinellas County citrus fruit loaded in boxcar for
shipment: Elfers, Fla. The date is 1931. (I believe the "boxcar"
is actually a reefer.)

http://digital.hcplc.org/burgert/archive09/8263.jpg

I have never seen barrel crates before. Were these very common?
Idunno, but I really appreciated an image illustrating hexagonal
closest packing of circles. Meanwhile the imagination runs rampant
with possibilities for a project I'm working on.
--
Nolan Hinshaw, native Californian since 1944
"[Vista is] about as stable as a one-legged elephant on a skateboard"
C. Daniels


CNW/CMO Slogan Boxcars

Tim Meyer
 

Hi

I am looking for information on CNW/CMO slogan boxcars. So far this is what I have found.

April 1976 North Western Lines

April 1981 North Western Lines by Fred Hartwig

Summer 1983 North Western Lines by Clem Devine

December 1986 Prototype Modeler by Lloyd Rinehart

Fall 1996 North Western Lines by Jeff Koeller

Railway Prototype Cyclopedia volume 1 by Pat Wider and Ed Hawkins
_____________________________________________________

The early 1937 slogans. From what I can tell theses slogans were used on both sides of the car.

CMO's ROUTE OF THE 400

CNW's ROUTE OF THE 400 AND THE STREAMLINERS and later changed to just ROUTE OF THE 400
_____________________________________________________

And 5 slogans that started in 1944

THE OVERLAND ROUTE

ROUTE OF THE 400 FLEET

ROUTE OF THE 400 STREAMLINERS

ROUTE OF THE CHALLENGERS

ROUTE OF THE STREAMLINERS
_____________________________________________________


Thanks for any help.

Tim


Re: Barrel Crates - How Common Were These?

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Jan 3, 2010, at 12:15 PM, Bob C wrote:

This image is from the Tampa-Hillsborough County Public Library's Burgert Brothers Photographic Archives. The caption reads, "Barrel crates of Pinellas County citrus fruit loaded in boxcar for shipment: Elfers, Fla. The date is 1931. (I believe the "boxcar" is actually a reefer.)

http://digital.hcplc.org/burgert/archive09/8263.jpg

I have never seen barrel crates before. Were these very common?
Idunno, but I really appreciated an image illustrating hexagonal
closest packing of circles. Meanwhile the imagination runs rampant
with possibilities for a project I'm working on.
--
Nolan Hinshaw, native Californian since 1944
"[Vista is] about as stable as a one-legged elephant on a skateboard"
C. Daniels


For Sale: S scale steam era freight cars

Rob Sarberenyi <espeef5@...>
 

I'm selling some S scale (real 1/64 scale, NOT American Flyer stuff) rolling
stock for a friend that includes several 1937 AAR 40' box cars in various
roadnames, along with other steam era freight cars also in a variety of
roadnames. The listings end later tonight

http://stores.ebay.com/Espee-F-5

Thanks for looking!


Rob Sarberenyi


Re: Precision Scale parts

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

gary laakso wrote:
Which part number did you order? I have their catalogues and have a list of parts to order and the project today is to find which one to order! TIA
PSC 32110. Beautiful parts.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: ATSF raised--roof BX-12

railwayman <stevelucas3@...>
 

Brian--

I'll get a pair of the #202 trucks and finish the car as a Bx-11. Good thing that you now have Canadian suppliers. I picked your trucks up at Terry Link's booth at a train show 100 miles west of Toronto yesterday.

Very nice work. I'd read much about them, but not seen any until yesterday. By the way, it's been pointed out to me that the #201 trucks are a good match for the trucks used on CN car orders from 1929 to at least the mid-1930's.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "brianleppert@..." <brianleppert@...> wrote:



Or use the TMW-202 trucks and number the car as a Bx-11. There's only a slight difference in the ends and a couple correctable grab irons, and the trucks will be correct. That's what I'm going to do <g>.

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@> wrote:

On Jan 3, 2010, at 3:09 PM, railwayman wrote:

Are the TMW 201 "50 ton Dalman 2-level trucks" suitable for this
car as modelled by the Westerfield kit?
Steve, the Santa Fe Dalman trucks had Barber Lateral Motion devices,
so what you need are the TMW #202 trucks. Actually, the Bx-11s had
Dalman 2-level trucks, for which the TMW HO scale trucks are dead
on. The Bx-12s, built a year later, had Dalman 1-level trucks, which
were made only briefly ca. 1930-'32, and have never been modeled in
HO. However, the TMW #202s are quite close - as close as you're
going to get.

Richard Hendrickson





Re: Precision Scale parts

gary laakso
 

Which part number did you order? I have their catalogues and have a list of parts to order and the project today is to find which one to order! TIA

gary laakso
south of Mike Brock where its 62 degrees n sunny
vasa0vasa@earthlink.net

----- Original Message -----
From: Denny Anspach
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: 1/4/2010 12:39:30 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Precision Scale parts



Very recently, PSC filled my phone order for tank car stanchions in a
matter of days (they had them packaged and in stock). My more usual
experience over the year is that one has to wait some weeks while the
parts are cast to order.

They did comment to me that there had been considerable interest in
the stanchions recently.

They ARE pretty nice!

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Precision Scale Angle Cock Bracket

golden1014
 

Tony, Schuyler and All,

Thanks for the advice. I'll give 'em a call today. Have fun at Cocoa!

John Golden
Bloomington, IN

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Schuyler Larrabee wrote:
Many years ago, I was looking desperately for some PSC GP handrail
brackets. I ordered them from Walthers and kept getting an answer
"Out of stock at the manufacturer." This went on for months.
Finally, I realized that PSC was essentially up the road a ways - I
lived in San Francisco then, and at that time PSC was located in
Woodland CA, just up Interstate 80 a few miles. So, I called
information and got their phone number, called them up and asked
when they would be making more of the particular part I wanted. I
was greeted with laughter, not mean laughter, but laughter
nonetheless. When he regained his composure, he asked "How many
pounds of them would you like?"
That little story is to suggest that you should call PSC
directly. I suspect you could get several pounds of the "Brass
Angle Cock Brackets" if you do so.
Exactly. Walthers is like a lot of hobby shops. When they say "out
of stock," it may easily just mean "not convenient for us to order
right now," as Signature Press has learned also with MANY hobby shops
regarding our books.
I recently arranged a bulk order of PSC parts with little trouble
and a nice discount. DO call them.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: ATSF raised--roof BX-12

railwayman <stevelucas3@...>
 

Richard--

Thanks! I'll get a pair of the TMW 202's for this car, and number/detail it as a Bx-11. I'll have to read the Westerfield instructions a bit more closely.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On Jan 3, 2010, at 3:09 PM, railwayman wrote:

Are the TMW 201 "50 ton Dalman 2-level trucks" suitable for this
car as modelled by the Westerfield kit?
Steve, the Santa Fe Dalman trucks had Barber Lateral Motion devices,
so what you need are the TMW #202 trucks. Actually, the Bx-11s had
Dalman 2-level trucks, for which the TMW HO scale trucks are dead
on. The Bx-12s, built a year later, had Dalman 1-level trucks, which
were made only briefly ca. 1930-'32, and have never been modeled in
HO. However, the TMW #202s are quite close - as close as you're
going to get.

Richard Hendrickson




94661 - 94680 of 182364