Date   

Re: Galvanized roofs

John Sykes III
 

Yes.  Some did and some didn't.  Some paints would not stick to galvanized steel at first, so early roofs almost always had their paint peeling off, sometimes dramatically.  Eventually steel manufacturers came up with galvanizing processes that were more "friendly" to paint and paint manufacturers came up with paints that stuck to galvanized panels better.  Eventually, many carbuilders just left the galvanized roofs unpainted.

-- John


Galvanized roofs

Brian Shumaker
 

A recent post on another forum discussed weathering of steel boxcar roofs and I queried if all cars had galvanized roofs. Why, does it seem, some cars shed their roof top paint and others didn't?  Did some car makers use galvanized panels while others did not?
Brian


Re: Photo: SFRD 13000 - Stainless Steel Reefer (1946)

Fred Jansz
 

Impressive car.
Would love one in my reefer collection.
Is there a model?


Ignore, please delete

Schuyler Larrabee
 

 


Re: a little help from the ACL experts

Benjamin Scanlon
 

I have a fair number of ACL photos harvested from all over, tho not including this type of DS boxcar, but I can see no freight car with this version of ACL logo and it's just the thing a toy train company would put on a model. 
--
Ben Scanlon
Tottenham, England


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] inexpensive kit-bash

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Keep them coming!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rene LaVoise
Sent: Thursday, August 13, 2020 9:37 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] inexpensive kit-bash

 

Thanks Elden.  The Monon gon was a pretty easy project using the spiral ends from Shapeways. 

I have two other kit-bashes of USRA gons waiting for their trip through the paint shop, Ted Culotta's Litchfield & Madison from the St Louis 2018 RPM and a W&LE with replacement steel sides.

--
René LaVoise
Kirkwood, MO


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] inexpensive kit-bash

Rene LaVoise
 

Thanks Elden.  The Monon gon was a pretty easy project using the spiral ends from Shapeways. 

I have two other kit-bashes of USRA gons waiting for their trip through the paint shop, Ted Culotta's Litchfield & Madison from the St Louis 2018 RPM and a W&LE with replacement steel sides.

--
René LaVoise
Kirkwood, MO


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] inexpensive kit-bash

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Chuck;

 

That was one of the most difficult resin kits I’ve ever built.  Unbelievable fit problems.

 

I had no idea Tichy did decals for EJ&E!

 

Thanks for sharing!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chuck Cover
Sent: Wednesday, August 12, 2020 3:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] inexpensive kit-bash

 

Thanks for the kind words Elden.  The EJ&E boxcar is indeed an ancient Sunshine #11.1.  I love the way it looks next to the larger boxcars that dominate most 1950s layouts.  I think the kit came without decals, so I used the Tichy.

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM


Re: a little help from the ACL experts

David Wiggs
 

Agreed, on rolling stock I don't think the herald was ever used on any freight car or MOW equipment, but was used on observation car placards.  It was used on diesel engines from onset of cab units and on hood units starting with GP7s and also on TOFC trailers.  Letter coloring was either silver or purple and shifted to white when car bodies became black.  TOFC heralds were yellow with black lettering.  When used on their steamers, they used the ACL monogram on the tenders and occasionally on the engine front.  Way more info than needed, but hey....


Re: Photo: SFRD 13000 - Stainless Steel Reefer (1946)

Bob Chaparro
 

Not really, Andy.

In the late 1880 Southern California citrus nurserymen went north of the Tehachapi Mountains to market nursery stock.

Tulare County Genealogy Trails tells us that "In 1892 there were boosters a-plenty for the new [citrus] industry. It was deemed desirable to show the world that a new citrus district, producing fruit unequaled, had been discovered. The World's Fair at St. Louis was to open January 1, 1904. Above all things it behooved growers here to make a big showing. P. M. Baier was selected to prepare such an exhibit. The first full carload to leave the county was the fruit for this display and it required practically all grown in the county lo fill it."

This source goes on to say, "In 1893 there were four carloads at the Frost orchard, and in the next season the Exchange and the Earl Fruit Companies entered the field, getting out a pack of sixteen cars. This fruit reached the eastern market in time for the Thanksgiving and Christmas markets and sold for extra high prices. As this period of ripening is several weeks in advance of Southern California a great deal of attention was attracted to this locality and many southern growers came, saw the results accomplished, and invested."

Finally, the crop report for 1945 from the Tulare County Agricultural Commissioner/Sealer shows that there were nearly 36,000 acres of bearing Valencia and navel oranges in the county. That same report shows over eight million boxes of oranges were produced in the county.

So the photo caption unquestionably is wrong.

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: SFRD 13000 - Stainless Steel Reefer (1946)

Brian Termunde
 

Not that I disagree with what you or anyone else says, it does show Bob C. is correct, it IS a poorly written caption to leave so much to the imagination.

My comment was strictly meant to a *possibility*, as I have no way to actually know, so I speculated. Nothing more.

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, Utah


Re: Photo: Grain Sack On Flat Car (Undated)

Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Aug 12, 2020 at 01:04 PM, Douglas Harding wrote:

Don that is not a normal size flatcar. The group of people to the right are standing next to a similar car. The deck is about at the lady’s knee, ie 18” high. Those rails may be 36” apart, making the deck about 5’ wide. So those may be grain sacks.

We forget, in this day and age, how common tramways were in the past. One shouldn't automatically assume that rails mean railroad. The motive power for this operation appears to be that team of mules, and from the looks of the deck they've been up and down it many, many times.

Cutest tramway I recall was in the print shop of the Chicago Transit Authority, used to print bus transfers and dating back to streetcar days. In the floor was a little 16" gauge tramway, still in use in the eighties to bring rolls of paper to the presses.

Dennis Storzek


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] inexpensive kit-bash

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Chuck;

 

My kit, build, which was cruelly stolen, but originally gifted to me by Ed Hawkins, had decals.  Given the commentary on how flawed that kit was, and the challenges of assembling that kit, I am amazed you also put that SOB together.

 

Given the wanderings of these “Steel Road” box cars in tin plate, steel sheet, etc., I m astounded more people have not got onboard the necessity of having these cars and others on their roads.

 

Great job!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chuck Cover
Sent: Wednesday, August 12, 2020 3:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] inexpensive kit-bash

 

Thanks for the kind words Elden.  The EJ&E boxcar is indeed an ancient Sunshine #11.1.  I love the way it looks next to the larger boxcars that dominate most 1950s layouts.  I think the kit came without decals, so I used the Tichy.

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM


Re: Photo: Grain Sack On Flat Car (Undated)

Douglas Harding
 

Don that is not a normal size flatcar. The group of people to the right are standing next to a similar car. The deck is about at the lady’s knee, ie 18” high. Those rails may be 36” apart, making the deck about 5’ wide. So those may be grain sacks.

 

The other possibility is sacks of cotton. Think of those photos of people picking cotton by hand, dragging large gunny sacks behind them as they pick.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Donald B. Valentine via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2020 8:25 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Grain Sack On Flat Car (Undated)

 

   Given that the nominal width of a flat car deck even at this early era was at least 9 ft. I’m going to suggest that anyone who thinks those are “grain sacks” on the flat car is badly mistaken. The sacks in the photo are a minimum of 4 ft. long being laid horizontally. That’s considerably longer than a normal 100 ib. grain sack, and

also thicker, was before the US Govt. began talking out of two sides of its mouth at once, on one hand promoting

better physical education programs because Americans were so out of shape while on the other hand seeking a

reduction of the standard grain bag weight to 50 lbs. to reduce back problems. Working with my son’s late uncle we used to get two boxcar loads of Blue Seal grain out of Richford, VT onto to the team track at Waterbury every other Tuesday for delivery over two afternoons. Out normal way of handling the bags was to take a 100 lb. bag on each shoulder from the boxcar to the truck and then from the truck to the farmer’s grain room. I also has sheep for nearly 20 years, purchasing and hauling the Blue Seal feed for them in 100 ln. bags. Thus I think I know what a 100 lb. bag of grain looks like and have never heard of grain being bagged in any heavier bags. I’m open to suggestions as to what is in the bags seen on the photos but am darn sure it is not grain.

 

Cordially, Don Valentime


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] inexpensive kit-bash

Chuck Cover
 

Thanks for the kind words Elden.  The EJ&E boxcar is indeed an ancient Sunshine #11.1.  I love the way it looks next to the larger boxcars that dominate most 1950s layouts.  I think the kit came without decals, so I used the Tichy.

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM


Re: Photo: Grain Sack On Flat Car (Undated)

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

   Given that the nominal width of a flat car deck even at this early era was at least 9 ft. I’m going to suggest that anyone who thinks those are “grain sacks” on the flat car is badly mistaken. The sacks in the photo are a minimum of 4 ft. long being laid horizontally. That’s considerably longer than a normal 100 ib. grain sack, and

also thicker, was before the US Govt. began talking out of two sides of its mouth at once, on one hand promoting

better physical education programs because Americans were so out of shape while on the other hand seeking a

reduction of the standard grain bag weight to 50 lbs. to reduce back problems. Working with my son’s late uncle we used to get two boxcar loads of Blue Seal grain out of Richford, VT onto to the team track at Waterbury every other Tuesday for delivery over two afternoons. Out normal way of handling the bags was to take a 100 lb. bag on each shoulder from the boxcar to the truck and then from the truck to the farmer’s grain room. I also has sheep for nearly 20 years, purchasing and hauling the Blue Seal feed for them in 100 ln. bags. Thus I think I know what a 100 lb. bag of grain looks like and have never heard of grain being bagged in any heavier bags. I’m open to suggestions as to what is in the bags seen on the photos but am darn sure it is not grain.

 

Cordially, Don Valentime


Re: PRR Freighy Car Paint Mix

Tony Thompson
 

Proving once again that time travel is possible. The simple explanation is when you dropped the etching, it bounced into the future, and you just had to wait to catch up with it.

Dennis Storzek

This explanation certainly fits all the facts <g>. It is definitely what one of my colleagues used to call "A" theory.

Tony Thompson




Airbrush masking

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

    I got some Tichy #3080 roller bearings.  I use a plastic holder for wheelsets and tried these on the axle ends.  They work perfectly to keep paint off the axle ends.  Just a thought for those who might want to try this.  HO only!

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Image with partial view of PFE 12765 - Undated

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,,
 
Image with partial view of PFE 12765. Undated, but the locomotive was scrapped 1/1929, so the photo if from before that date.
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] inexpensive kit-bash

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Really nice cars, Chuck!

 

Is that EJ&E car the ancient Sunshine kit?

 

Thanks!

 

Elden

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chuck Cover
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2020 11:31 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] inexpensive kit-bash

 

Group:  Thanks for all the positive comments.

 

Jim Brewer asked:  How were the Tichy decals to work with?

 

I know that Tichy decals have been discussed previously on this list and some have said that they are too thick and hard to work with.  However, I have used Tichy decals for a number of projects when the kit does not come with decals or I want to letter for a different road.  I have found them to be easy to work with and they look fine to me on the finished models.  I use the same process as with other decal products.  Attached are a few photos of models for which I used Tichy decals.

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM

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