Date   

Re: Photo: Poultry Car

Bob Webber
 

In theory at least, the information may possibly be found at the PA State Archives in Harrisburg, for the Standard Steel built cars, and the H&B cars *may* have information somewhere in the Pullman Library's files - though I haven't located yet.  Much of the freight car data for H&B, aside from the drawings themselves is MIA.  Same, as with many institutions. But we do have drawings and photos, that's more than nothing. 


At 12:21 PM 4/13/2020, Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:

Doug  Harding commented:

"That is the only known photo of the car Egg. Unfortunately we cannot make out the car number. It is a Live Poultry car, ie LPTC reporting marks. Most Live Poultry cars were named, but not all. They were named for people, places, or different kinds of fowl, or fowl related words, ie  Egg. By the late 20s there were over 2800 poultry cars on the nations railroads.

I have compiled a list of poultry cars, their numbers and their names, based on photos. Photos are the only record we have of these cars. The list has less than a 100 cars. There is no known list contain such information or records of the Live Poultry Transit Corporation or of the Palace Poultry Car Company. Eventually both companies were owned by North American Car Co."

Bob Webber


Re: Tamiya primer (was [RealSTMFC] Painting brass)

Ken Adams
 

I have been using the Tamiya light grey primer multiple on my current SP O-50-13 project to check detail removal from original shells and the fit of new domes and hand rails. The grey highlights any areas that need attention. 

I have used the Tamiya red oxide primer on several box car projects both as an undercoat and as a final coat with a brushed on Vallejo Model Color Cavalry brown wash to come very close to the SP "Metallic" color.
--
Ken Adams


Re: Photo: Poultry Car

Bob Chaparro
 

Doug  Harding commented:

"That is the only known photo of the car “Egg”. Unfortunately we cannot make out the car number. It is a Live Poultry car, ie LPTC reporting marks. Most Live Poultry cars were named, but not all. They were named for people, places, or different kinds of fowl, or fowl related words, ie  Egg. By the late 20’s there were over 2800 poultry cars on the nation’s railroads.

I have compiled a list of poultry cars, their numbers and their names, based on photos. Photos are the only record we have of these cars. The list has less than a 100 cars. There is no known list contain such information or records of the Live Poultry Transit Corporation or of the Palace Poultry Car Company. Eventually both companies were owned by North American Car Co."


Re: Riding the Rods Part 2 GN 9996

Douglas Harding
 

Bill did you change the lighting you shoot under? The photos look to have a purple cast to the body color. Does not look like the ModelFlex Maroon Tuscan Oxide Red that I have used.

 

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill Welch
Sent: Monday, April 13, 2020 11:54 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Riding the Rods Part 2 GN 9996

 

Here is a Great Northern truss rod boxcar inspired by a circa 1954 photo by the late Bruce Meyer built w/a Westerfield kit I ordered when Al announced he was retiring and selling his business. i ordered several kits "just in case" he did not find a buyer—Thank you Andrew Dahm! Pretty much out-of-the-box except for the scratch built Running Board system, and the brass wire and brass turnbuckles for the underframe. Decals are from the kit plus the GN medallion from a Microscale set as I wanted to exactly copy the reference photo I used. The only variance is the GN reweigh location because I could not find the "Q" I needed. Obviously need to install the brake wheel. Painted w/Badger's "Maroon Tuscan Oxide Red."

Bill Welch


Re: Riding the Rods Part 2 GN 9996

Paul Doggett
 

Bill 

Excellent as always 
Paul Doggett.   England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 13 Apr 2020, at 17:54, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

Here is a Great Northern truss rod boxcar inspired by a circa 1954 photo by the late Bruce Meyer built w/a Westerfield kit I ordered when Al announced he was retiring and selling his business. i ordered several kits "just in case" he did not find a buyer—Thank you Andrew Dahm! Pretty much out-of-the-box except for the scratch built Running Board system, and the brass wire and brass turnbuckles for the underframe. Decals are from the kit plus the GN medallion from a Microscale set as I wanted to exactly copy the reference photo I used. The only variance is the GN reweigh location because I could not find the "Q" I needed. Obviously need to install the brake wheel. Painted w/Badger's "Maroon Tuscan Oxide Red."

Bill Welch

Attachments:


Riding the Rods Part 2 GN 9996

Bill Welch
 

Here is a Great Northern truss rod boxcar inspired by a circa 1954 photo by the late Bruce Meyer built w/a Westerfield kit I ordered when Al announced he was retiring and selling his business. i ordered several kits "just in case" he did not find a buyer—Thank you Andrew Dahm! Pretty much out-of-the-box except for the scratch built Running Board system, and the brass wire and brass turnbuckles for the underframe. Decals are from the kit plus the GN medallion from a Microscale set as I wanted to exactly copy the reference photo I used. The only variance is the GN reweigh location because I could not find the "Q" I needed. Obviously need to install the brake wheel. Painted w/Badger's "Maroon Tuscan Oxide Red."

Bill Welch


Re: Tamiya primer (was [RealSTMFC] Painting brass)

Pete C
 

Folks,
Since we are talking about primers I want to mention the product that Badger makes, it’s called Stynylrez.
The primer comes in three colors, black, white and gray. It goes on very smoothly with brush or airbrush and is very fine and self leveling. There is also a line of Stynylrez paints in many colors.
I was looking for a product that will adhere to brass(metal) and plastics. When kit bashing or adding details to rolling stock or motive power there is inevitably going to be a mix of media used in the different manufacturers products. In testing, nothing I tried adhered as well as Stynylrez. Frankly I was skeptical when I was researching and found this stuff, but I was amazed at how well it worked.
I tried several of the Mr... products and two of Tamiya’s primers, and while they worked they were easy to scratch. Stynylrez has excellent scratch resistance and is very durable.
Sorry if this sounds like an “infomercial” but I no ties to the manufacture, just a really satisfied customer.
Pete Cesaro

On Apr 13, 2020, at 11:36 AM, Craig Zeni <clzeni@gmail.com> wrote:


On Apr 13, 2020, at 6:01 AM, main@RealSTMFC.groups.io wrote:

6a. Re: Tamiya primer (was [RealSTMFC] Painting brass)
From: Denny Anspach <danspachmd@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2020 01:26:29 EDT

I have gone back to always using a light colored primer (gray or white) on brass simply because I have found -convincingly so- that the utterly flat finish offers an opportunity to see clearly, iron out, sand out, and eliminate blemishes that are so often impossible to perceive until you see them on the terminal finish coat. I do the same on resin, styrene and wood. Like others reporting this change back has been eased by Tamiya after studying the raving reports of its use coming from the military and car modelers. If it interferes with detail, it is detail that -thankfully- I do not perceive.

Bill Welch, this is all your fault. You're the one that made me start considering paints besides Scalecoat... *shakes fist*

I have to say that my experience well mirrors Dr Denny's, this after not being a primer user for years. I just didn't use it. But when I started working on F units a couple of years ago with plugging horn holes and working on smoothing the parting lines found on the nose and sides of the nose, I decided to try a primer. I'd heard a LOT of good things about the Gunze product Mr Hobby "Mr Surfacer 1500". Sprayed with their "Mr Color" thinner, it is wonderful stuff. Goes down dead smooth, cleanly and easily. And it will show the results of filling holes and such. If I didn't get the hole filled perfectly, it will show. The Mr Hobby "Mr White Putty" is so superior to any of the regular hobby putties it's not even funny. Super fine grain, easy to sand, and reportedly not prone to shrinkage. I then have been painted with, yes, some of the Mr Hobby paints and their thinner "Mr Self Leveling Thinner"...and the paint is also wonderful to spray. The thinner works wonder, makes it all very forgiving. I've also been told that the Mr Self Leveling Thinner works well with the Tru Color paint; I've not tried it myself.

There's actually not a "Mr ____" product that I've tried that I didn't like. Their Mr Dissolved Putty is a styrene filler, not a putty - think of the old trick of dissolving sprue in Testors liquid cement and using it as filler...same thing. The coarser "Mr Surfacer" product (500 and 1000) are also light filler/sandable primers.

I've also had great results with Tamiya paints, MIG paints, and the Vallejo line tho' the latter primarily as weathering. There some great products used by other modelers in other realms. Hasegawa offers some chisel tools - if you heard my clinic at Cocoa Beach you heard me just rave about those...

Craig Zeni
Cary NC


Re: Question re: upcoming Rapido USRA DS box

Douglas Harding
 

Ed, it is possible the fascia boards were added to reinforce the tops of the siding boards. Vibrations tend to pop nails. Could it be that while the bottom of siding boards popped loose because of water damage and rot, that at the same time the top of the boards popped nails because of car movement and vibration?

 

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of spsalso via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 13, 2020 10:39 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Question re: upcoming Rapido USRA DS box

 

Bill,

Your statement about having to widen the model's roof to accept a fascia implies, to me, that that had to have been true for the prototype.  If so, it would seem to mean that the fascias were ONLY applied when new (wider) roofs were, also.

Or.  One could ask:  "Whatever would prompt someone to add a strip of wood at the top of a box car side?"


Ed

Edward Sutorik



On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 07:43 AM, Bill Welch wrote:

On Sun, Apr 12, 2020 at 08:36 PM, spsalso wrote:

I am not very knowledgeable about the variations on these cars.  I do think that for the price, Rapido should do the "easy-peasy" mods.  The fascia strip appears to be such a thing. 
Edward Sutorik

 To apply the facia, the roof needs to be widened to lap over it. Not sure how easy that will be w/the Rapido model. Easy to do w/the Westerfield kit.

Bill Welch


Re: Question re: upcoming Rapido USRA DS box

spsalso
 

Regarding the film of the PGE wreck:

First:  what fantastic quality--color looks near perfect, and picture quality is great

There are two GN cars in the film:  24804 (the one the crane was trying to right) and what could be 2XXX2.

Note that the wreck was being worked from both ends.  Early on, you can see a steam loco with a car equipped with a BIG winch.  They're working the CP car.

For the crane, I don't necessarily think the crane was too small for the job.  It did tip, after all, not "break".  I suspect the crane wasn't blocked adequately.  The ground looked pretty wet.  And squishy.  It appears the car might have been loaded.  There appears to be white material around the car door.  They COULD have emptied the car to make it lighter.  That would have taken a good bit of time, of course.  Judgement call.

The loaded car would have weighed about 120,000 pounds.  60 tons.  They had placed blocking under the car's drawbar, at the end farthest from the crane.  They would then appear to have been planning to lift the near end (to the crane) and swing it towards the track.  The lift would have been about 30 tons.  What's got me puzzled is that there's a cable that attaches to the blocked-up drawbar, travels up the end of the car and over to the crane boom.  I just don't get that.  NOT the crane operator's proudest moment!

Note also that the crane was righted using block and tackle.  Since I don't see a cable going over to the equipment behind the tipped crane, I do wonder if the winch at the other end of the wreck is supplying power.  Or perhaps they had a boat that could pull the cable.  It surely wasn't the four guys who had been pumping the hydraulic jack.


Ed

Edward Sutorik




On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 07:53 AM, Bruce Smith wrote:
Claus,
 
Correct. Indeed, I see no footage of the GN car being righted, but that wimpy little derrick was clearly not up to the task of lifting the car and remaining upright. It also looks like they may have been dealing with 2 different GN cars, or that they dragged the GN car clear of the cut and then rolled the derrick trying to get it back onto the rails.
 
Note that the PGE and its successor, BCRail, always had serious avalanche/rock fall problems on many of their lines.
 
Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
 
 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...>
Sent: Monday, April 13, 2020 8:57 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Question re: upcoming Rapido USRA DS box
 
Hi List Members,
 
Colin wrote: “A video from the Pacific Great Eastern of a GN USRA being righted after a wreck.  From the mid-fifties.”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdtnVk2M3YU&t=2s
 
Thanks Colin for the video link, it was fascinating to watch some of the process involved in fixing things up when a mess like that occurs.
 
It looked to me like at some point the wreck crane itself tipped over, and they had to right it again, am I interpreting this correctly?
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 
From: Kemal Mumcu via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 13, 2020 9:01 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Question re: upcoming Rapido USRA DS box
 
One thing about these Rapido cars that could be corrected is the incorrect ride height.  They ride high on the trucks.  This was the same problem with the NP cars.  I had to make a jig and sand down the excess bolster material to bring down the car to ride at the right height. 

A possible solution:  Make the cars with the correct bolster ride height and add a fitted washer to deliver the cars.  The toy train types will be happy and more discerning modelers can remove the washer to bring down the car to the right height. 

Colin Meikle

A video from the Pacific Great Eastern of a GN USRA being righted after a wreck.  From the mid-fifties.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdtnVk2M3YU&t=2s


Re: Utah Coal Route steel gons in log service

erieblt2
 

Logging continues, sometimes illegally. For example, stolen logs caused a landslide that destroyed a bridge on the former Milwaukee Main line (now a wonderful trail-with now a gap). I feel for the loggers. There is a sustainable lumber industry. It helps fund education in Washington State. Need to help those families, but there is no way to support modern mechanized lumbering. Trees can’t grow that fast. The old lumber railroads are fantastic. Be safe All Bill S.


On Apr 13, 2020, at 8:50 AM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



Someone may have corrected you already Tony.

This is my daughter in 2011 in front of a 300+ foot tall Sitka Spruce, not very far from Forks, WA.


On 4/12/2020 2:19 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:

Tim O'Connor wrote:


They look like Lodgepole pine logs. The Lodgepole grows like a weed in the northwestern
states and forms dense stands. It's not a Douglas Fir or one of the mighty Spruce trees
from the Olympic Peninsula (that grew well over 300 feet tall) or even Ponderosa pine,
but not all lumber needs to be high quality. :-)

      Tim has (probably unintentionally) garbled his statement a little. The 300-ft. trees on the Olympic Peninsula are Douglas fir, not spruce (for record spruce trees, visit Vancouver Island). Lodgepoles 100 feet tall would be a VERY tall tree of that species. As I said, this doesn't CONTRADICT what Tim said, hopefully clarifies it.

Tony Thompson


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts
<Katy largest SitkaSpruce in the HohValley OlympicNatlPark 08-16-2011.jpg>


Re: Utah Coal Route steel gons in log service

Tim O'Connor
 

Tony

Is the odor because of the sulfuric acid used in the production of kraft (brown) paper?
Or from some other chemicals, perhaps?

Tim O'Connor

On 4/12/2020 7:04 PM, espee4441 wrote:
Most likely for paper and pulp as you mention. The "Aroma of Tacoma" mainly is no longer evident due to the major cessation of the mills.

Port Townsend on the Olympic Peninsula has one too and they're on the last days of doing business if not outright closed. These mills always carry the distinctive smell and PT still has it. The MILW ran into and by this operation on its way to Port Angeles. As for logging the peninsula certain sections like the Duckabush must have been exceedingly challenging. I mtn bike the old roads and hillsides are incredibly steep.

Tony Pawley
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: Question re: upcoming Rapido USRA DS box

spsalso
 

Bill,

Your statement about having to widen the model's roof to accept a fascia implies, to me, that that had to have been true for the prototype.  If so, it would seem to mean that the fascias were ONLY applied when new (wider) roofs were, also.

Or.  One could ask:  "Whatever would prompt someone to add a strip of wood at the top of a box car side?"


Ed

Edward Sutorik



On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 07:43 AM, Bill Welch wrote:
On Sun, Apr 12, 2020 at 08:36 PM, spsalso wrote:
I am not very knowledgeable about the variations on these cars.  I do think that for the price, Rapido should do the "easy-peasy" mods.  The fascia strip appears to be such a thing. 
Edward Sutorik
 To apply the facia, the roof needs to be widened to lap over it. Not sure how easy that will be w/the Rapido model. Easy to do w/the Westerfield kit.

Bill Welch


Re: Utah Coal Route steel gons in log service

Tim O'Connor
 

When I drove down the Olympic Peninsula in 2011 we stopped in Astoria OR. There was a
large freighter (ocean vessel) being loaded with thousands of logs just about the same
size seen in the photo of the UCR gondolas. Even by the 1940's I suspect a high percentage
of the really giant stuff that was easily accessible to logging railroads had already been
harvested. Of course we didn't know then that cutting down so many would ruin the moist
cool microclimate of those coastal forests, and now they'll never grow back.

Tim O'Connor

On 4/12/2020 5:04 PM, Todd Sullivan via groups.io wrote:
What's interesting to me is that most of the logs in the log pond appear to be similar in size to the loads in these gons. Perhaps the mill was using them for lumber, but maybe for chips or pulp for paper?  And there's that interesting tall building in the background which almost looks like it is connected to the log pond operation by a conveyor.

Also a thought about the crane at the far end of the gons.  It certainly looks like it is unloading the logs into the pond (notice the man on the log load dealing with the steel strapping).  If it is self-propelled, it could simply switch each empty gon out of the way and work on the next.  This was 1946 when processes like this were not always efficient as in later years.  On a model railroad, this could add some interesting activity!

Todd Sullivan
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: Tamiya primer (was [RealSTMFC] Painting brass)

Craig Zeni
 

On Apr 13, 2020, at 6:01 AM, main@RealSTMFC.groups.io wrote:

6a. Re: Tamiya primer (was [RealSTMFC] Painting brass)
From: Denny Anspach <danspachmd@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Apr 2020 01:26:29 EDT

I have gone back to always using a light colored primer (gray or white) on brass simply because I have found -convincingly so- that the utterly flat finish offers an opportunity to see clearly, iron out, sand out, and eliminate blemishes that are so often impossible to perceive until you see them on the terminal finish coat. I do the same on resin, styrene and wood. Like others reporting this change back has been eased by Tamiya after studying the raving reports of its use coming from the military and car modelers. If it interferes with detail, it is detail that -thankfully- I do not perceive.

Bill Welch, this is all your fault. You're the one that made me start considering paints besides Scalecoat... *shakes fist*

I have to say that my experience well mirrors Dr Denny's, this after not being a primer user for years. I just didn't use it. But when I started working on F units a couple of years ago with plugging horn holes and working on smoothing the parting lines found on the nose and sides of the nose, I decided to try a primer. I'd heard a LOT of good things about the Gunze product Mr Hobby "Mr Surfacer 1500". Sprayed with their "Mr Color" thinner, it is wonderful stuff. Goes down dead smooth, cleanly and easily. And it will show the results of filling holes and such. If I didn't get the hole filled perfectly, it will show. The Mr Hobby "Mr White Putty" is so superior to any of the regular hobby putties it's not even funny. Super fine grain, easy to sand, and reportedly not prone to shrinkage. I then have been painted with, yes, some of the Mr Hobby paints and their thinner "Mr Self Leveling Thinner"...and the paint is also wonderful to spray. The thinner works wonder, makes it all very forgiving. I've also been told that the Mr Self Leveling Thinner works well with the Tru Color paint; I've not tried it myself.

There's actually not a "Mr ____" product that I've tried that I didn't like. Their Mr Dissolved Putty is a styrene filler, not a putty - think of the old trick of dissolving sprue in Testors liquid cement and using it as filler...same thing. The coarser "Mr Surfacer" product (500 and 1000) are also light filler/sandable primers.

I've also had great results with Tamiya paints, MIG paints, and the Vallejo line tho' the latter primarily as weathering. There some great products used by other modelers in other realms. Hasegawa offers some chisel tools - if you heard my clinic at Cocoa Beach you heard me just rave about those...

Craig Zeni
Cary NC


Re: Utah Coal Route steel gons in log service

Tim O'Connor
 


Someone may have corrected you already Tony.

This is my daughter in 2011 in front of a 300+ foot tall Sitka Spruce, not very far from Forks, WA.


On 4/12/2020 2:19 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Tim O'Connor wrote:


They look like Lodgepole pine logs. The Lodgepole grows like a weed in the northwestern
states and forms dense stands. It's not a Douglas Fir or one of the mighty Spruce trees
from the Olympic Peninsula (that grew well over 300 feet tall) or even Ponderosa pine,
but not all lumber needs to be high quality. :-)

      Tim has (probably unintentionally) garbled his statement a little. The 300-ft. trees on the Olympic Peninsula are Douglas fir, not spruce (for record spruce trees, visit Vancouver Island). Lodgepoles 100 feet tall would be a VERY tall tree of that species. As I said, this doesn't CONTRADICT what Tim said, hopefully clarifies it.

Tony Thompson


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Question re: upcoming Rapido USRA DS box

Bruce Smith
 

Claus,

Correct. Indeed, I see no footage of the GN car being righted, but that wimpy little derrick was clearly not up to the task of lifting the car and remaining upright. It also looks like they may have been dealing with 2 different GN cars, or that they dragged the GN car clear of the cut and then rolled the derrick trying to get it back onto the rails.

Note that the PGE and its successor, BCRail, always had serious avalanche/rock fall problems on many of their lines.

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...>
Sent: Monday, April 13, 2020 8:57 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Question re: upcoming Rapido USRA DS box
 
Hi List Members,
 
Colin wrote: “A video from the Pacific Great Eastern of a GN USRA being righted after a wreck.  From the mid-fifties.”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdtnVk2M3YU&t=2s
 
Thanks Colin for the video link, it was fascinating to watch some of the process involved in fixing things up when a mess like that occurs.
 
It looked to me like at some point the wreck crane itself tipped over, and they had to right it again, am I interpreting this correctly?
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 
From: Kemal Mumcu via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 13, 2020 9:01 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Question re: upcoming Rapido USRA DS box
 
One thing about these Rapido cars that could be corrected is the incorrect ride height.  They ride high on the trucks.  This was the same problem with the NP cars.  I had to make a jig and sand down the excess bolster material to bring down the car to ride at the right height. 

A possible solution:  Make the cars with the correct bolster ride height and add a fitted washer to deliver the cars.  The toy train types will be happy and more discerning modelers can remove the washer to bring down the car to the right height. 

Colin Meikle

A video from the Pacific Great Eastern of a GN USRA being righted after a wreck.  From the mid-fifties.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdtnVk2M3YU&t=2s


Re: Question re: upcoming Rapido USRA DS box

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Colin wrote: “A video from the Pacific Great Eastern of a GN USRA being righted after a wreck.  From the mid-fifties.”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdtnVk2M3YU&t=2s
 
Thanks Colin for the video link, it was fascinating to watch some of the process involved in fixing things up when a mess like that occurs.
 
It looked to me like at some point the wreck crane itself tipped over, and they had to right it again, am I interpreting this correctly?
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 

From: Kemal Mumcu via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 13, 2020 9:01 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Question re: upcoming Rapido USRA DS box
 
One thing about these Rapido cars that could be corrected is the incorrect ride height.  They ride high on the trucks.  This was the same problem with the NP cars.  I had to make a jig and sand down the excess bolster material to bring down the car to ride at the right height. 

A possible solution:  Make the cars with the correct bolster ride height and add a fitted washer to deliver the cars.  The toy train types will be happy and more discerning modelers can remove the washer to bring down the car to the right height. 

Colin Meikle

A video from the Pacific Great Eastern of a GN USRA being righted after a wreck.  From the mid-fifties.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdtnVk2M3YU&t=2s


Re: Question re: upcoming Rapido USRA DS box

Bill Welch
 

On Sun, Apr 12, 2020 at 08:36 PM, spsalso wrote:
I am not very knowledgeable about the variations on these cars.  I do think that for the price, Rapido should do the "easy-peasy" mods.  The fascia strip appears to be such a thing. 
Edward Sutorik
 To apply the facia, the roof needs to be widened to lap over it. Not sure how easy that will be w/the Rapido model. Easy to do w/the Westerfield kit.

Bill Welch


Re: Photo: Poultry Car

Ray Breyer
 

I think that the change from C to X did happen right around 1926; I have photos of LPTC cars as late as 1925, and LPTX cars as early as 1928.
Still, the company operated as LPTC for 35 years, and as LPTX for nine. I'll always consider LPTC to be the proper name.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL



On Sunday, April 12, 2020, 03:48:44 PM CDT, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:


Ed Sutorik wrote:

The statement by Ray Breyer:  "LPTC, please.  The X didn't come until after 1926." conflicts with my November 1926 ORER . . .My suspicion is that it was around 1926 when the "X" became required.  

      The (strong) recommendation for the "X" suffix was in about 1915. Certainly in my 1923 ORER issue there are a huge number of "…X" reporting marks. I don't know that 1926 was a notable year, but maybe someone on the list knows specifics. 

Tony Thompson




Re: Rocket Express Stock Car

Paul Doggett
 

Clark 

That’s a great looking addition to your already fine fleet of resin freight cars.
Paul Doggett.    England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 13 Apr 2020, at 14:15, Clark Propst <cepropst@q.com> wrote:

Just finished the Rocket Express stock car kit. Beautiful castings, very complete kit. Everything needed except couplers for obvious reasons. Even had a length of chain for the brake rigging and formed cut levers. I mixed Scalecoat box car red and Oxide red ~50/50. Weathering is mostly colored pencils with Pan Pastels to blend. My only issue with the kit was the laser cut running boards are very fragile. I ended up replacing the laterals with other resin kit leftovers.
CW Propst

Attachments:

9561 - 9580 of 181139