Date   
Re: PMcK&Y (was Fascinated by the Obscure)

Tim O'Connor
 

Rats! I guess I will have to reletter my Tichy box car. Were any
of the rebuilt cars (as represented by the Tichy model) relettered
and renumbered for P&LE? And if so, in what series?

Tim O'Connor

Just happen to have an April 1952 ORER laying here on the desk. P&LE still
lists 3270 cars with PMcKY reporting marks. Of the 1500 original 53000 -
54499 number series 1470 remain lettered for PMcKY. This is the largest group
of cars remaining in these reporting marks. The break down by car type is 1
XM 36' boxcar, 1496 HT hoppers, 184 HM hoppers, 1586 GB gons
Rich Orr

Re: "Fascinated by the obscure"

Bruce Smith
 

On Sat, February 7, 2009 3:09 pm, Mike Brock wrote:

That opens the door, BTW, for
various eastern RRs to have Big Boys or ATSF 2-10-4's in the
consist....among others. Incidentally, Pennsy worked the Challengers
headed to the Clinchfield so Pennsy modelers could have 6 really odd
ball locos.
And, of course, how could a Pennsy modeler pass on the ATSF 2-10-4's
working north of Columbus?
Mike,

Funny you should mention the ATSF 2-10-4s... Baldwin built 2-10-4s... in
fact, built in 1944. Unlike the challenges, as best I can tell they were
not "worked west", but rather traveled dead-in-tow. New locos shipped
from Baldwin were dropped at Columbia PA to have the bearings inspected by
a "Baldwin man". I have a stand-in (Botchman) that is on the bench
waiting for some added details, but really, I am waiting for those locos
to come out in nice plastic <G>. I'll gut the electronics, pull off the
main rods, crate them and some other parts to ride on the tender deck,
board up the windows and light and now I have an interesting operationally
significant addition.. and you know, it was pointed out to me that
Baldwin also shipped some SP ACs in the summer of 1944 too! I have two
VO1000s that will show up in that traffic as well, one NP and the other US
Army. These will likely show up once a year each, so say one new loco
load every 3-4 ops sessions.

Speaking of US ARMY, I'm still trying to justify the price, but DJH makes
a USA/TC S160 2-8-0 that could also show up as dead in tow (with adapter
cars for european couplers) or as a flat car load (especially if gauged
for Russia). If I don't put too many identifying marks on it, like
numbers, it can show up repeatedly within a limited number of ops sessions
as a different loco.

Oddball loads? Well... kinda like the gun barrels, digging shows that
they showed up somewhere on the average of once a week. Not so odd!

Regards
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

another film

Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

A friend sent me a copy of The Little Rascals in Railroadin', a shrt circa 1930 with the kids inadvertantly starting an ATSF loco and their adventures. Plenty of steam, lots of trackage, some freight. Worth a watch. - Al Westerfield

Re: "Fascinated by the obscure"

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Tom Madden writes:

"The car and load are extremely interesting and
completely atypical - a Jersey Central flat car carrying a large
sailboat through the Sierras. But it was there, and I photographed it
because it was interesting. The train is eastbound, waiting for a
soon-to-arrive westbound to clear. The car and load may well have
traversed Sherman Hill a couple of days later, but Mike would no
doubt catch a lot of grief if he included such a Lionel-looking car
in one of his freights."

Well...in the video The Big Boy Collection, there is a train westbound from Cheyenne with a mobile home of some sort on a flat car. It never has appealed to me though. That video...which, BTW, is one of the few places where you can view entire trains in 1953 [ hence X4005 with all those SP box cars ] seems to show trains with some odd ball somewhere in the consist. The long frt leaving Cheyenne with one IC hopper, another one about to enter Hermosa Tunnel with a C&EI hopper. Perhaps more interesting is the video Steam Over Sherman which shows trains operating between Denver and Cheyenne...if I recall correctly...one with a diesel switcher in the consist [ that might have been in Nebraska ]. Hmmm. That opens the door, BTW, for various eastern RRs to have Big Boys or ATSF 2-10-4's in the consist....among others. Incidentally, Pennsy worked the Challengers headed to the Clinchfield so Pennsy modelers could have 6 really odd ball locos. And, of course, how could a Pennsy modeler pass on the ATSF 2-10-4's working north of Columbus?

Mike Brock

Kits now shipping

Jim King
 

The Southern and C&O pulpwood rack kits started shipping to dealers
yesterday. Mail orders will start shipping Tuesday. If you still want one
or more, it's not too late but once the initial batch of kits are cast and
packaged (plus a few spares), I'm moving on to the next project full-force,
so expect some delay in receiving kits from this "second batch".



Contact me off list to place your order. I'm still offering a 10% discount
if you order ANY road name combination of 3 kits ($199 including shipping).



Jim King

Smoky Mountain Model Works, Inc.

<http://www.smokymountainmodelworks.com>

Re: "Fascinated by the obscure"

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tom Madden wrote:
The car and load are extremely interesting and completely atypical - a Jersey Central flat car carrying a large sailboat through the Sierras. But it was there, and I photographed it
because it was interesting. The train is eastbound . . . the car and load may well have
traversed Sherman Hill a couple of days later, but Mike would no doubt catch a lot of grief if he included such a Lionel-looking car in one of his freights.
Same story as the photo of the cabin cruiser on an SP flat, reproduced in my Vol. 3 on SP freight cars, page 264--just like the Athearn model.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

Re: "Fascinated by the obscure"

Tom Madden <tgmadden@...>
 

Dave Evans:
Good story, and one wonders why the blue B&M was in such a consist,
but your rational for taking the picture illustrates why so many
photographs are suspect for doing population studies. Wide yard
shots and distant train shots are good, but pictures of a few cars
in the train - why did the photographer take a picture at THAT
instant....
Another case in point:

http://home.att.net/~pullmanproject/Colfax_02.jpg

Those of you who attended my "Accidental Railfan" clinic a few years
ago have seen this photo. I took it in February 1959 at Colfax CA, on
the Espee's Donner Pass line. For the record, that beautiful sailboat
is sitting on CRP #170, a 70-ton flat that Sunshine and Protowest
have done in resin, and InterMountain will shortly release in
plastic. Note the prominent trust plate. I took the photo, and
several others from various angles, because of the fantastic load and
the scruffy passenger sharing the car. That's him on the right. The
clean-cut fellow to the left is an Air Force buddy who owned the car
that took three of us on a rambling ride through the Sierra foothills
that Sunday. The car and load are extremely interesting and
completely atypical - a Jersey Central flat car carrying a large
sailboat through the Sierras. But it was there, and I photographed it
because it was interesting. The train is eastbound, waiting for a
soon-to-arrive westbound to clear. The car and load may well have
traversed Sherman Hill a couple of days later, but Mike would no
doubt catch a lot of grief if he included such a Lionel-looking car
in one of his freights.

Tom Madden

wheel painting tool

Ned Carey <nedspam@...>
 

The photos I uploaded of my wheel painting tools have been approved and are now in the photos section

Hopefully this link will work
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/20463649/pic/list

Ned Carey

Re: "Fascinated by the obscure"

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Chet French wrote:
A few cars that show on the "On Hand" reports during 1952 at Forrest IL on the Wabash.

SDAE 7002 mty for brick loading (B-50-16) 1 of 3 cars.
This one is interesting because SD&AE only had three of these cars. Talk about finding a tiny needly in your haystack--er, national freight car fleet.

PMcKY 53144 mty HT
Hadn't the PMcKY been absorbed by P&LE more than ten years earlier? But there are other examples of "P-Mickey" (as it's called) cars keeping their old lettering for YEARS after it was officially obsolete. That wasn't always true of absorbed railroads, of course.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

Re: "Fascinated by the obscure"

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

I love Delano's yard photos. A little too early and out of area for
me, but appearing to show a typical day on the railroad. Colour seems
to be accurate, no doubt a function of the known stability of the
Kodachrome film that Delano used.

Then we get to that blue B&M boxcar on Sherman Hill. Why does it
stick out? Colour. Were it a 'boxcar red' car, it might become, to
the eye, part of an amorphous mass of freight cars. Consider the
appearance of a silver Georgia RR USRA steel rebuild boxcar, or a
silver D&RGW 'cookie box' in a train. Unless you are modelling the
Georgia RR or D&RGW and have many of these cars, these cars stand out
in a hurry. To a lesser extent, so would a NC&StL boxcar with a
yellow stripe running along the car side.

My wife gave me the Tichy kit for the Georgia RR USRA steel rebuild
years ago. I'm sure the LHS owner was glad to get rid of it.
Luckily, I found that circa 1954, the Georgia Railroad re-painted
these cars in 'boxcar red'. And I model 1956. Problem solved, sort
of. Remember our continual discussion of freight car distribution, to
be concluded sometime in the future.....????

The most 'obscure' car that I have is a TLT CN aluminum sided 40'
boxcar. One of only three aluminum-sided cars in the roughly
40,000-car CN steel 40' boxcar fleet in 1956, it can't be justified
being seen on a layout too often, even on a quasi-CN line in Eastern
Ontario, Canada. One operating session out of twenty, perhaps??

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "devansprr" <devans1@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., "Tom Madden" <tgmadden@> wrote:


Not the obscure - just the unusual. And "unusual" can be a very
ordinary car completely out of context. Like Mike's N&W hopper on
Sherman Hill. It catches your eye. I just went through some of my old
slides and came upon three taken in sequence from the Sacramento
depot platform in the Fall of 1959. Eastbound SP freight of
indeterminate length led by a trio of notch-nose Alco something-or-
other diesels in the 3800 series. With one exception all the cars
visible in the photos are company service cars, mostly gons,
including a UP ballast hopper and two SP tanks. The exception is a
bright blue 50' B&M boxcar just ahead of the caboose. First photo
shows the engines, second shows the two SP tanks (the second & third
cars behind the diesels, with the UP hopper immediately following),
and the third shows the B&M boxcar. Ahead of the B&M car stretches a
long string of dirty red GS gondolas which I remember paying no
attention to once I spotted the blue car approaching in the distance.
I was young, operating on an enlisted man's wages, and film (plus
developing) was relatively costly. So I rationed my film and shot the
unusual, the things that caught my eye. I suspect I wasn't alone in
this.


Tom Madden
Tom,

Good story, and one wonders why the blue B&M was in such a consist,
but your rational for taking the picture illustrates why so many
photographs are suspect for doing population studies. Wide yard shots
and distant train shots are good, but pictures of a few cars in the
train - why did the photographer take a picture at THAT instant....

Another reason why Delano's yard photos are so valuable (compared to
others).

Dave Evans

Re: "Fascinated by the obscure"

Tim O'Connor
 

Mike, you can definitely deploy one on Sherman Hill!!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MGR-1_Honest_John

At 2/7/2009 11:55 AM Saturday, you wrote:
Spen,

You're not off topic - the Honest John Rocket (M31) was first deployed
in 1954 and was certainly small enough to be mounted on a flat car.

Bert

Re: "Fascinated by the obscure"

Tim O'Connor
 

I'm pretty sure this is the model I owned as a child
at the end of the steam era... (SP had only recently
discontinued steam operations)

http://www.postwarv2.com/honestJohn/models/roco_kit_113.jpg

At 2/7/2009 11:55 AM Saturday, you wrote:
Spen,

You're not off topic - the Honest John Rocket (M31) was first deployed
in 1954 and was certainly small enough to be mounted on a flat car.

Bert

Spen Kellogg wrote:

Mike Brock wrote:


Wait 'til you see my rocket launching car next Jan.


Mike,
Are you sure you have the background to design a rocket launching car?
<VBG> Oh wait, we didn't have rocket launching cars during the STMFC
time period. Sorry, I guess I'm off topic.

Spen Kellogg

Re: "Fascinated by the obscure"

Tim O'Connor
 

I had an HO model of a rocket on a trailer (I think it was
one of the original Mini-Tank models) in 1958 when I lived
in San Bernadino. I remember even though I was only 5 because
I took it outside to play and it got broken... traumatic! (snif)

Tim O'Connor

At 2/7/2009 11:55 AM Saturday, you wrote:
Spen,
You're not off topic - the Honest John Rocket (M31) was first deployed
in 1954 and was certainly small enough to be mounted on a flat car.
Bert

Re: "Fascinated by the obscure"

Bert Decker
 

Spen,

You're not off topic - the Honest John Rocket (M31) was first deployed in 1954 and was certainly small enough to be mounted on a flat car.

Bert

Spen Kellogg wrote:

Mike Brock wrote:


Wait 'til you see my rocket launching car next Jan.


Mike,
Are you sure you have the background to design a rocket launching car?
<VBG> Oh wait, we didn't have rocket launching cars during the STMFC
time period. Sorry, I guess I'm off topic.

Spen Kellogg



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Re: AMB Wheels Masks

Tim O'Connor
 

Steve

It ain't dirty enuf, but it does eliminate the problem of
lubrication of the needle point axles!

I am now using PBL's Neolube, but think it a bit unnatural looking for
these wheel faces. Here's a photo of a truck containing wheelsets
treated with Neolube--
http://www.p-b-l.com/Rolling-Stock/WebTrucks/TK-1.html
And the product itself--I also use it for lubing switch points--
http://www.p-b-l.com/pbl2000/Neolube.html
Steve Lucas.

Re: "Fascinated by the obscure"

Chet French <cfrench@...>
 

A few cars that show on the "On Hand" reports during
1952 at Forrest IL on the Wabash.

SDAE 7002 mty for brick loading (B-50-16) 1 of 3 cars.

WFS 6068 mty (Wichita Falls & Southern 40' box)

Rut 8101 Mdse (lcl)

Rut 8005 mty for brick loading

GaFla 7485 mty

IHCX 524 Coal going to a CO-OP in a town of 300.
(Internation Harvester Co. car)

PMcKY 53144 mty HT

CASO 138106 Flour Mitchell, IL

If a car has flanged wheels, it can go anywhere.

Chet French
Dixon, IL

Re: AMB Wheels Masks

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

I've used a few methods over the years to model oily wheel faces on
STMFC's fitted with plain bearing trucks. The first was the old
modeller's standby, Floquil Grimy Black. I then used Polly-S Oily
Black. This I was most satisfied with, when Floquil discontinued this
colour. If only they'd bring it back!!!!

I am now using PBL's Neolube, but think it a bit unnatural looking for
these wheel faces. Here's a photo of a truck containing wheelsets
treated with Neolube--

http://www.p-b-l.com/Rolling-Stock/WebTrucks/TK-1.html

And the product itself--I also use it for lubing switch points--

http://www.p-b-l.com/pbl2000/Neolube.html

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...>
wrote:

Tim makes a most important point here, especially since the photos on
the AMB website show the wheels in their jig painted a uniform rust
color. Okay for wheels in roller bearing trucks, but definitely NOT
okay on steam era freight cars with solid bearings. Oil leaking past
the primitive seals at the back of the journal boxes ran out onto the
wheel faces, which distributed it all over the underside of the car
and, in stripes, up the ends of adjacent cars. The oil, of course,
collected grime, with the result that the wheel faces were a dirty
dark gray. Wheel backs and axles, on the other hand were a dirty
rust color. Though there is an abundance of photographic evidence
for this, I repeatedly see models of steam era freight cars at RPM
meets or in photos with rusty wheels, though I suppose that's better
than shiny metal wheels popped into the trucks just as they come out
of the box.


Richard Hendrickson




Re: AMB Wheels Masks

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

If you look at photos of mainline track in our timeframe, you'll see
that the rails are often oily black to the outside of the track, and
rusty on the inside. This was a result of oil sprayed off wheelsets.
And yes, this oil had leaked from plain bearing journal boxes.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "devansprr" <devans1@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@>
wrote:

Tim makes a most important point here, especially since the photos
on
the AMB website show the wheels in their jig painted a uniform rust
color. Okay for wheels in roller bearing trucks, but definitely NOT
okay on steam era freight cars with solid bearings. Oil leaking past
the primitive seals at the back of the journal boxes ran out onto
the
wheel faces, which distributed it all over the underside of the car
and, in stripes, up the ends of adjacent cars. The oil, of course,
collected grime, with the result that the wheel faces were a dirty
dark gray. Wheel backs and axles, on the other hand were a dirty
rust color. Though there is an abundance of photographic evidence
for this, I repeatedly see models of steam era freight cars at RPM
meets or in photos with rusty wheels, though I suppose that's better
than shiny metal wheels popped into the trucks just as they come out
of the box.


Richard Hendrickson
Richard & Tim,

Pardon the interuption - perhaps a little off-topic. Does this mean
that rails should be grimy on the outside surfaces, but rusty on the
sides facing each other? Stands to reason that oil running off the
face of the wheel ends up on the outside corner of the rail where it
would be squeezed over the outside corner. Not much of the oil would
make it to the inside edge. Ballast dust would quickly glom onto this
oil and kind of set it permanently.

Might the ties and ballast reflect a similar effect? More greasy/grimy
outboard of the rails, and more indicative of other materials on the
inside - e.g. brake shoe dust on down grades, sand on upgrades,
cinders everywhere else?

Good color photos of WWII track work (mainline, not yards) seem to be
rare. Many are below grade, pointed up towards equipment, and the
rails and ties are often in the shadows.

Stands to reason that the appearance of post-journal bearing, post
steam, and post passenger track could be quite different.

Dave Evans

Re: "Fascinated by the obscure"

Spen Kellogg <spenkellogg@...>
 

Mike Brock wrote:


Wait 'til you see my rocket launching car next Jan.


Mike,
Are you sure you have the background to design a rocket launching car? <VBG> Oh wait, we didn't have rocket launching cars during the STMFC time period. Sorry, I guess I'm off topic.

Spen Kellogg

Re: "Fascinated by the obscure"

Bruce Smith
 

On Sat, February 7, 2009 8:15 am, A. Premo wrote:
Well,maybe not so obscure,but seeing an IC stock car,a Southern and
CBQ
hopper in northern New England left me scratching my head .Armand Premo
Armand,

The hoppers are a puzzle someone else might address, but coming up with a
plausible story for the stock car is relatively easy. Clearly, it came
from the west, most likely the Chicago area. I don't know how much
finished beef ended up being shipped for slaughter to New England from
Chicago but that is definitely one possibility. Large amounts certainly
traveled as far as New York. This car would simply have been an available
empty at the point of loading. Headed in the "wrong direction" according
to car service rules, but hey, they needed an empty (and we all know by
now that car service rules were often ignored at the local level)!
Another option would be the transfer of breeding cattle (most likely
dairy) from a location on the IC to the location in New England. After
all, it is doubtful that the IC had an empty Rutland car on hand to load
<VBG>.


Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL