Date   

Re: Train Schedules and the USRA

Allen Rueter
 

Richard,
Are there any notes on preferred routes for perishables to Detroit Union Produce Terminal?
(GTW went to Detroit, but it would of been a transfer run down to DUPT).


--
Allen Rueter
StLouis MO

______________________________
From: Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@opendoor.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Fri, April 2, 2010 6:54:31 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Train Schedules and the USRA

8<

I will add that written instructions have survived advising Santa Fe
agents to ship perishables east of Chicago via the Erie and GTW if
possible and to use the PRR only as a last resort. I don't know if I
have copies of them, but I've seen them, and I'm thoroughly persuaded
that SFRD thinking and policy in this matter was the same as that of
PFE. Why there are still those who doubt this, or what their
motivation might be, I can't imagine. In any event, the PRR's
atrocious loss rate on perishables is well documented in the ICC
archives, so it's small wonder that the western RRs didn't want the
PRR handling perishable shipments if there was an alternative. The
reluctance to understand and accept this well established history is
difficult to understand.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Digest Number 6208(LV Caboose)

Jedalberg
 

Re: LV caboose parts:
Ben,
You can use the steps off of a couple of the LL NE cabooses---you will have
to do the same thing as Dick Steinbrenner did years ago--I did the same
thing, upgrading the old Varney caboose bodies with there 3" rivets. Another
alternative, if you can find one is the ECW NE kit, which had a sprue with
just what you are looking for--steps--you are on your own with the
windows--I just drilled a hole and cut a frame from .010 styrene for the circular
frame.
Nice to see you at our RPM meet last weekend---we had 250 attendees!

Jim Dalberg
Paoli


Re: HO MILWAUKEE Rib Side Boxcar Special price

Staffan Ehnbom <staffan.ehnbom@...>
 

....and the S2 trucks, of course.

Staffan

----- Original Message -----
From: Andy Carlson
To: Steam Era
Sent: Saturday, April 03, 2010 5:23 PM
Subject: [STMFC] HO MILWAUKEE Rib Side Boxcar Special price



STMFC'ers, I have received from Frank at Intermountain Railway Co. several as delivered scheme 40' Rib Side Boxcars. These are the short rib, as built in 9-45 and are Mint, condition 10 new cars. MSRP is $30.00, your price is $18.00 each, the normal wholesale price.

I have 6 numbers for the as delivered, with weigh marks of 9-45. IntMt #48503-(1-6)
I have 6 numbers for the as delivered, with reweigh date of 1958. IntMt # 48503-(7-12)

These cars are "Route of the Hiawathas"
I can include a pair of Branchline Barber S2 trucks, which are the closest available trucks in HO, at no charge if requested at time of order.

Shipping prices will be added, and will be calculated at actual cost. If interested, contact me off-list (PLEASE) at <midcentury@sbcglobal.net>

Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: HO MILWAUKEE Rib Side Boxcar Special price

Staffan Ehnbom <staffan.ehnbom@...>
 

Andy,

May I buy one of those with the 1958 reweigh date?

Staffan

----- Original Message -----
From: Andy Carlson
To: Steam Era
Sent: Saturday, April 03, 2010 5:23 PM
Subject: [STMFC] HO MILWAUKEE Rib Side Boxcar Special price



STMFC'ers, I have received from Frank at Intermountain Railway Co. several as delivered scheme 40' Rib Side Boxcars. These are the short rib, as built in 9-45 and are Mint, condition 10 new cars. MSRP is $30.00, your price is $18.00 each, the normal wholesale price.

I have 6 numbers for the as delivered, with weigh marks of 9-45. IntMt #48503-(1-6)
I have 6 numbers for the as delivered, with reweigh date of 1958. IntMt # 48503-(7-12)

These cars are "Route of the Hiawathas"
I can include a pair of Branchline Barber S2 trucks, which are the closest available trucks in HO, at no charge if requested at time of order.

Shipping prices will be added, and will be calculated at actual cost. If interested, contact me off-list (PLEASE) at <midcentury@sbcglobal.net>

Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


HO MILWAUKEE Rib Side Boxcar Special price

Andy Carlson
 

STMFC'ers, I have received from Frank at Intermountain Railway Co. several as delivered scheme 40' Rib Side Boxcars. These are the short rib, as built in 9-45 and are Mint, condition 10 new cars. MSRP is $30.00, your price is $18.00 each, the normal wholesale price.

I have 6 numbers for the as delivered, with weigh marks of 9-45. IntMt #48503-(1-6)
I have 6 numbers for the as delivered, with reweigh date of 1958. IntMt # 48503-(7-12)

These cars are "Route of the Hiawathas"
I can include a pair of Branchline Barber S2 trucks, which are the closest available trucks in HO, at no charge if requested at time of order.

Shipping prices will be added, and will be calculated at actual cost. If interested, contact me off-list (PLEASE) at <midcentury@sbcglobal.net>

Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Cleaning Stock Cars (was Weathering Chalk)

Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

I don't know if the same principles apply to RR stock cars as apply to livestock semi-trailers but ...

My Dad drove for many years for a fellow who had triple-deck stock trailers. Iowa restricted semis to a shorter length than neighboring states to the west so sheep were hauled across Iowa from Nebraska and South Dakota to slaughter houses in Iowa, Wisconsin and Illinois by Iowa truckers.

Sheep were loaded 80 to a deck so that they were sufficiently "crowded" to hold each other on their feet in curves and sudden stops.

Hogs were loaded with more space so that they could all lie down. Until all or almost all were lying down Dad would stop periodically and prod those lying down onto their feet so they wouldn't get trampled. Eventually they would all lie down.

Beef cattle were docile and easy to handle. Dairy cattle, especially the bulls, had really mean dispositions. Any bulls were loaded first and had their heads tied to the trailer's side with baling wire. The bull's forehead would be pressed against the side and his horns were wired to a slat. Fortunately the bulls could be turned loose from outside the trailer. The bulls really didn't like being restrained and, once released, were looking for some human upon whom they could take revenge.

There were some occasions when cattle were transferred from stock cars on the Rock Island in Hampton, Iowa to semi-trailers (not the triple deck ones) for the trip to a feedlot but that must have been when I was really young 'cause I don't remember much about it.

Gene Green

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, steve.sandifer@... wrote:

The "recommendations" for double deck cars that I have seen have fewer in the upper deck than the lower. However, actual records that I have from rest stations indicate that both were loaded equally for sheep (which is where I have the most records.) I have 500+ records from San Bernardino 9n 1943-45 and a couple of hundered from Purcell, OK, 1939. 
 
Another factor is how manyhead a shipper wants to ship.  A rancher may only have 30 animals to ship so the car is "full" with his 30 while someone else may have 50 for the same size car. 
 
I think I have most of those record's posed on the Santa Fe Society website and I'll be doing a clinic on this at the East Coast Santa Fe modelers meet next weekend in Philadelphia.

--- On Fri, 4/2/10, Guy Wilber <guycwilber@...> wrote:


From: Guy Wilber <guycwilber@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Cleaning Stock Cars (was Weathering Chalk)
To: "STMFC@yahoogroups.com" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Friday, April 2, 2010, 11:26 AM


 



Kurt,

All quantities are based on the average weight per head of; cattle,
hogs, horses and sheep or lambs. Each type is listed as quantity per
36' or 40' car with further recommendations for double deck cars
generally being 8 to 10 head less loaded onto the upper deck.

The entire breakdown should be within the archives. I believe the
heading was something along the lines of "stockcar loads" as
originally asked by Mr. Phillip Dove of England back in the early days
of the list.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada

On Apr 1, 2010, at 7:59 PM, "Kurt Laughlin" <fleeta@verizon. net> wrote:

Steve, are the capacities listed on the site based on weight,
volume, or
common practice incorporating a bit of both?






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Cleaning Stock Cars (was Weathering Chalk)

Steve SANDIFER
 

The "recommendations" for double deck cars that I have seen have fewer in the upper deck than the lower. However, actual records that I have from rest stations indicate that both were loaded equally for sheep (which is where I have the most records.) I have 500+ records from San Bernardino 9n 1943-45 and a couple of hundered from Purcell, OK, 1939. 
 
Another factor is how manyhead a shipper wants to ship.  A rancher may only have 30 animals to ship so the car is "full" with his 30 while someone else may have 50 for the same size car. 
 
I think I have most of those record's posed on the Santa Fe Society website and I'll be doing a clinic on this at the East Coast Santa Fe modelers meet next weekend in Philadelphia.

--- On Fri, 4/2/10, Guy Wilber <guycwilber@aol.com> wrote:


From: Guy Wilber <guycwilber@aol.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Cleaning Stock Cars (was Weathering Chalk)
To: "STMFC@yahoogroups.com" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Friday, April 2, 2010, 11:26 AM


 



Kurt,

All quantities are based on the average weight per head of; cattle,
hogs, horses and sheep or lambs. Each type is listed as quantity per
36' or 40' car with further recommendations for double deck cars
generally being 8 to 10 head less loaded onto the upper deck.

The entire breakdown should be within the archives. I believe the
heading was something along the lines of "stockcar loads" as
originally asked by Mr. Phillip Dove of England back in the early days
of the list.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada

On Apr 1, 2010, at 7:59 PM, "Kurt Laughlin" <fleeta@verizon. net> wrote:

Steve, are the capacities listed on the site based on weight,
volume, or
common practice incorporating a bit of both?


LV Northeastern Caboose - HO Scale Part Availability

Benjamin Hom
 

Looking for a source for the following parts to model Lehigh Valley Northeastern cabooses in HO:

Detail Associates 6509 (rectangular end window)
Detail Associates 6510 (porthole end window)
LV 3-tread cast steps

As far as I can tell, the Detail Associates parts are out of production; Dick Steinbrenner's article in the August 1982 recommends modifying Quality Craft Reading cast steps to the LV steps, but these are out of production as well.

Thanks in advance!


Ben Hom


Northwest Santa Fe Mini-Meet on May 8

John Thompson
 

The 11th annual Mini-Meet of Santa Fe Railway fans and modelers in the Northwest will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, May 8, 2010, in a new location: Messiah Lutheran Church, 410 H Street NE, Auburn, WA 98002.

The current agenda, subject to change, looks like this:

9:00 -10:00 – Register, pick up handouts, meet other attendees
10:00 -- Bill Messecar on "ATSF Open Top Cars to 1960 and HO Models"
11:00 –Tim Repp slide show of "Visits to the Santa Fe"
12:00 – 1:30 -- No-host lunch break – no sandwich lunches for sale this year
1:30 -- Introductions of Attendees, Show & Tell, and Sales Tables open
2:00 – Richard Hendrickson on "Locomotives in My Life" (if weather permits him to fly in, otherwise a Santa Fe commercial slide show by John Thompson)
3:00 -- Break
3:15 – John Thompson on "Santa Fe's Postwar `Chief' and HO Models"
4:30 -- Discuss New Models, and Member Slide Show
5:00 -- End Mini-Meet

Cost for the event and handouts is $8.

To register, please contact John Thompson at jthomp1945@aol.com.

We're looking forward to seeing all you Santa Fe fans and modelers again.

Bill Messecar and John Thompson


Re: Train Schedules and the USRA

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Apr 2, 2010, at 12:42 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

Jim Dick wrote:
I cannot comment on Tony's assertion regarding the PRR, either one
way or the other, as there is nothing to confirm or deny that
statement. I did find comments on handing express fruit shipments
to the Erie.
Remember, this is not an assertion by ME, it is a report of
what I was told by PFE retirees. The transcript of my interviews has
been deposited a couple of places, including CSRM, if anyone would
like to read it for themselves. I should also repeat what I've said
earlier, that the PFE people did not think much of the NYC or B&O for
perishable dependability, either, only that PRR ranked even lower. To
them, the Erie really stood out. I have heard the same from Santa Fe
sources regarding SFRD shipments.
I will add that written instructions have survived advising Santa Fe
agents to ship perishables east of Chicago via the Erie and GTW if
possible and to use the PRR only as a last resort. I don't know if I
have copies of them, but I've seen them, and I'm thoroughly persuaded
that SFRD thinking and policy in this matter was the same as that of
PFE. Why there are still those who doubt this, or what their
motivation might be, I can't imagine. In any event, the PRR's
atrocious loss rate on perishables is well documented in the ICC
archives, so it's small wonder that the western RRs didn't want the
PRR handling perishable shipments if there was an alternative. The
reluctance to understand and accept this well established history is
difficult to understand.

Richard Hendrickson


UP 66070

Richard Townsend
 

What class of car would UP 66070 have been in 1904? Is there a photo of this class of cars on line somewhere? If you are interested it was carrying a 30,000 pound load of bagged plaster from Wild's Plaster Mill in Loveland, Colorado to Eaton, Colorado on September 30, 1904.


Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon


Re: Express Refrigerator Cars on the YVT, 1935 to 1963

Roger Hinman <rhinman@...>
 

Thanks for posting this

Roger Hinman
On Apr 2, 2010, at 2:37 PM, railsnw1 wrote:

Recently I have been working on more of the Yakima Valley Transportation Co. records and I have been going through the file on express shipments. From 1935 to 1963 the YVT shipped at least 157 express car loads of predominately cherries but in 1958 some prunes were also sent. The cars were mostly REX cars but cars also came from ACL, ATSF, GARX, GN, NP. NRC, PFE, PRR, SL-SF and WP. These were loaded at Ahtanum, Orchard, and Westbrook stations on the YVT and routed over the UP, the YVT parent company. These cars mostly went to the east coast and south.

In 1935 the 7 cars with routings were as follows:

PFE 791, 6-27-1935, Ahtanum to Yakima YVT, Yakima to Denver UP, Denver to El Paso AT&SF, El Paso to San Antonio T&NO

PRR 2691, 6-28-1935, Ahtanum to Yakima YVT, Yakima to Huntington OWR&N, Huntington to Granger OSL, Granger to Omaha UP, Omaha to Chicago C&NW, Chicago to Chicago Belt Ry., Chicago to New York Erie

SLSF 493, 6-29-1935, Ahtanum to Yakima YVT, Yakima to Huntington OWR&N, Huntington to Granger OSL, Granger to Omaha UP, Omaha to Chicago C&NW, Chicago to Chicago Belt Ry., Chicago to New York Erie

PRR 2762, 6-30-1935, Ahtanum to Yakima YVT, Yakima to Huntington OWR&N, Huntington to Granger OSL, Granger to Omaha UP, Omaha to Chicago C&NW, Chicago to Chicago Belt Ry., Chicago to New York Erie

PRR 2809, 7-3-1935, Ahtanum to Yakima YVT, Yakima to Omaha UP, Omaha to Chicago C&NW, Chicago to Chicago Belt Ry., Chicago to Scranton Erie

NP 3276, 7-5-1935, Ahtanum to Yakima YVT, Yakima to Huntington OWR&N, Huntington to Granger OSL, Granger to Omaha UP, Omaha to Chicago C&NW, Chicago to Chicago Belt Ry., Chicago to New York Erie

NP 3369, 7-6-1935, Ahtanum to Yakima YVT, Yakima to Huntington OWR&N, Huntington to Granger OSL, Granger to Omaha UP, Omaha to Chicago C&NW, Chicago to Chicago Belt Ry., Chicago to New York Erie

I have created an Excel spreadsheet of all the cars and placed it in the files section under a folder titled Express Reefers on the YVT.

Richard Wilkens



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Weathering Chalk

John Kellett
 

Hello Jack,
 
I usually use clearance artist chalks purchased from our local Michaels/Joann Fabrics store for my weathering.  But decided to try something new since the price was so cheap.  I am refilling some Smooth-On supplies from Dick Blick and saw the price of the Pentel 36-piece set was $5.00 and a 50-piece set was about $7.00.  So, I went with the 50-piece set to try out.  There were other sets available, but I thought more colors to define with, and for the small price, I am willing to try it.
 
I should receive my package around the 12th.
 
I think I will have some fun experimenting!
 
John K.

--- On Mon, 3/29/10, Jack Burgess <jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com> wrote:


From: Jack Burgess <jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com>
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Weathering Chalk
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, March 29, 2010, 10:57 AM


 



I've used pastel chalks (oil-based) for decades and never over-spray them
with Dullcote. However, I do my initial weathering with an airbrush, some
(such as sun-fading) when I initially air brush the model and the rest after
the decals have been applied and the car has been given a flat spray. I use
the pastels to provide additional color variations on the wheelsets and
trucks, on brake parts, and on other small details that I want to "pop" out
from the rest of the car. You can also use chalks to occasionally to
replicate lettering which has dissolved and starting to stain the side of
the car. I don't find a need to seal the car after applying this final
weathering since I don't handle my cars nor let anyone else do it and it is
limited to fine details. But, remember that most of the weathering (that
which would be most susceptible to handling) is done with an air brush.

A quick search on Amazon brought up a set of 36 Pentel oil-based chalks (the
same manufacturer of the set I use) which includes black, grey, white,
yellow, and rust (along with many others)...all the basic colors you need
for $10. Those chalks will give you and a friend enough chalk to last a
lifetime. I use a piece of sheet-rock metal sandpaper and scrape the chalks
onto it to create a pile of powder, saving each color of powder in a small
plastic 6-compartment storage box.

Bragdon Enterprises (www.bragdonent. com) sells some non-pastel materials
which a lot of modelers like. I have some but they are more expensive and I
like the fine control of the pastels better. But they might not be as
susceptible to coming off while handling.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyr r.com











[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Looking for good home: 1931 statement to ICC re: freight rate increase

pwkrueger <kruegerp@...>
 

I am trying to find a good home for the following booklet. Cost to you is postage, $1.75 within the US ($2.00 via PayPal). It has a top to bottom crease, but otherwise is in decent shape.

Thanks,
Paul
Seattle, WA

=======
Before the Interstate Commerce Commission:

IN THE MATTER OF INCREASES IN FREIGHT RATES AND CHARGES

Statement and application of the steam railroad carriers of the United States

Submitted by:

J.J. Pelley, Chairman, Special Committee of Presidents Representing the Eastern Group

H.A. Scandrett, Chairman, Special Committee of Presidents Representing the Western and Mountain-Pacific Groups

W.R. Cole, Chairman, Special Committee of Presidents Representing the Southern Group

June 16, 1931

20 pages

http://i257.photobucket.com/albums/hh230/pwkrueger/Misc/ICCrateapplication.jpg


Looking for good home: 1931 statement to ICC re: freight rate increase

pwkrueger <kruegerp@...>
 

I am trying to find a good home for the following booklet. Cost to you is postage, $1.75 within the US ($2.00 via PayPal). It has a top to bottom crease, but otherwise is in decent shape.

Thanks,
Paul
Seattle, WA

=======
Before the Interstate Commerce Commission:

IN THE MATTER OF INCREASES IN FREIGHT RATES AND CHARGES

Statement and application of the steam railroad carriers of the United States

Submitted by:

J.J. Pelley, Chairman, Special Committee of Presidents Representing the Eastern Group

H.A. Scandrett, Chairman, Special Committee of Presidents Representing the Western and Mountain-Pacific Groups

W.R. Cole, Chairman, Special Committee of Presidents Representing the Southern Group

June 16, 1931

20 pages

http://i257.photobucket.com/albums/hh230/pwkrueger/Misc/ICCrateapplication.jpg


Re: Train Schedules and the USRA

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Jim Dick wrote:
I cannot comment on Tony's assertion regarding the PRR, either one way or the other, as there is nothing to confirm or deny that statement. I did find comments on handing express fruit shipments to the Erie.
Remember, this is not an assertion by ME, it is a report of what I was told by PFE retirees. The transcript of my interviews has been deposited a couple of places, including CSRM, if anyone would like to read it for themselves. I should also repeat what I've said earlier, that the PFE people did not think much of the NYC or B&O for perishable dependability, either, only that PRR ranked even lower. To them, the Erie really stood out. I have heard the same from Santa Fe sources regarding SFRD shipments.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Express Refrigerator Cars on the YVT, 1935 to 1963

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Richard Wilkens wrote:
Recently I have been working on more of the Yakima Valley Transportation Co. records and I have been going through the file on express shipments. From 1935 to 1963 the YVT shipped at least 157 express car loads of predominately cherries but in 1958 some prunes were also sent. The cars were mostly REX cars but cars also came from ACL, ATSF, GARX, GN, NP. NRC, PFE, PRR, SL-SF and WP.
Most of these owners had their express cars in the Railway Express pool, and at least some others (NP for one) placed their cars in the RE pool seasonally. I listed the pool roads in the PFE book, page 101.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Train Schedules and the USRA

np328
 

Bill, finally found some time and I have been collecting paper, quite a bit of it on the topic that you and I had talked about. Some/much, covers the USRA period and should shine some light on your questions. Some of it covers schedules west coast to east coast and moving from 6th morning delivery to 5th morning.

I cannot comment on Tony's assertion regarding the PRR, either
one way or the other, as there is nothing to confirm or deny that statement. I did find comments on handing express fruit shipments
to the Erie.

Of info regarding the USRA, there were constant admonishments and petitions from the NP and others to the USRA to modify car edicts. And some pretty interesting reading.

Here is a statement regarding the shipping of cherries from the Yakima, WA area and the speeding up of fruit shipments circa 1946. This in applies to Mr. Paine of the REA who was pushing for forth morning delivery to Chicago markets with fifth morning New York delivery:

It is apparent that Mr. Paine has either overlooked or ignored the previous agreement reached with the Great Northern, Milwaukee, Union Pacific, and ourselves (NP) in connection with the handling of carload cherry shipments.

Bill, I will try to gather up the paperwork and get this out to you before the summer equinox. (Only partially kidding). Jim Dick – St. Paul

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:
The comments my message generated have been interesting and at times amusing, but except for a couple of points, I don't think I saw an answer to the question "Was this lack of regular schedules the cause (or a factor at least) of the RR's inability to get the job done moving freight in WWI resulting in the creation of the USRA? But it sounds like the answer may be "No."
Bill Welch


Express Refrigerator Cars on the YVT, 1935 to 1963

railsnw1 <railsnw@...>
 

Recently I have been working on more of the Yakima Valley Transportation Co. records and I have been going through the file on express shipments. From 1935 to 1963 the YVT shipped at least 157 express car loads of predominately cherries but in 1958 some prunes were also sent. The cars were mostly REX cars but cars also came from ACL, ATSF, GARX, GN, NP. NRC, PFE, PRR, SL-SF and WP. These were loaded at Ahtanum, Orchard, and Westbrook stations on the YVT and routed over the UP, the YVT parent company. These cars mostly went to the east coast and south.

In 1935 the 7 cars with routings were as follows:

PFE 791, 6-27-1935, Ahtanum to Yakima – YVT, Yakima to Denver – UP, Denver to El Paso – AT&SF, El Paso to San Antonio – T&NO

PRR 2691, 6-28-1935, Ahtanum to Yakima – YVT, Yakima to Huntington – OWR&N, Huntington to Granger – OSL, Granger to Omaha – UP, Omaha to Chicago – C&NW, Chicago to Chicago – Belt Ry., Chicago to New York – Erie

SLSF 493, 6-29-1935, Ahtanum to Yakima – YVT, Yakima to Huntington – OWR&N, Huntington to Granger – OSL, Granger to Omaha – UP, Omaha to Chicago – C&NW, Chicago to Chicago – Belt Ry., Chicago to New York – Erie

PRR 2762, 6-30-1935, Ahtanum to Yakima – YVT, Yakima to Huntington – OWR&N, Huntington to Granger – OSL, Granger to Omaha – UP, Omaha to Chicago – C&NW, Chicago to Chicago – Belt Ry., Chicago to New York – Erie

PRR 2809, 7-3-1935, Ahtanum to Yakima – YVT, Yakima to Omaha – UP, Omaha to Chicago – C&NW, Chicago to Chicago – Belt Ry., Chicago to Scranton – Erie

NP 3276, 7-5-1935, Ahtanum to Yakima – YVT, Yakima to Huntington – OWR&N, Huntington to Granger – OSL, Granger to Omaha – UP, Omaha to Chicago – C&NW, Chicago to Chicago – Belt Ry., Chicago to New York – Erie

NP 3369, 7-6-1935, Ahtanum to Yakima – YVT, Yakima to Huntington – OWR&N, Huntington to Granger – OSL, Granger to Omaha – UP, Omaha to Chicago – C&NW, Chicago to Chicago – Belt Ry., Chicago to New York – Erie

I have created an Excel spreadsheet of all the cars and placed it in the files section under a folder titled Express Reefers on the YVT.

Richard Wilkens


Re: Cleaning Stock Cars (was Weathering Chalk)

William Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Kurt & Group,

My understanding is that the capacity for number of animals shown is based upon the space that would take up within the given length stock car. Example: the number of calves is higher than the number of full grown cattle because they are smaller and thus more can be herded into the stock car.

It appears that stock cars loaded with stock tended to be relatively light loaded compared to their load capacity.

Bill Keene
Irvine, CA

On Apr 1, 2010, at 7:59 PM, Kurt Laughlin wrote:

Steve, are the capacities listed on the site based on weight, volume, or
common practice incorporating a bit of both? (Conceivably an animal load
could "cube out" because they can't be packed as densely as boxes. . .)

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Steve Sandifer

See also
http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/03.htm for the various
loads in stock cars.

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