Date   

Re: Orange & Lemons Shipped West

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Stan (not signing his name) wrote:
Bananas
Don't need to be refrigerated much but can't freeze.
Nope. There were banana docks in both LA and San Francisco, and in any case N'Awlins is closer to California than the East Coast (and was America's biggest banana port).

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: USRA hoppers questions

FRANK PEACOCK
 

Steve, sorry for the slight delay in responding to your question about USRA Hopper Cars. By now you probably know this, but the R&LHS has a publication (Railroad History No. 128, Spring 1973) that had a article by J. E. Lane that is the best single source of USRA freight car info that I know of, it is 29 pp and has charts, photos, etc. I think that back issues are available from the R&LHS. If you have trouble eMail me and I'll see if I can find a copy for you. USRA Spec. 1005-B is the 2-bay hop. car, by the way. FHP (Frank H. Peacock)

To: stmfc@yahoogroups.com
From: shed999@hotmail.com
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 2009 13:28:53 -0800
Subject: [STMFC] USRA hoppers questions























I'm just curious to know if someone besides Westerfield makes a USRA 3-bay open hopper.



I love Westerfield kits, and I have a lot of them, but I'm just curious to know what someone does if they need 100 of these cars and doesn't have the time to make one from a Westerfield kit. It seems to me that NYC and subs plus the C&O had a lot of these cars.



Another question is whether the Accurail or Tichy has the most accurate USRA 2-bay open hopper.



My last question is if anyone has compiled a list of USRA 2-bay and 3-bay open hoppers.



- Steve H.



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Re: Orange & Lemons Shipped West

jonespwr
 

Bananas

Don't need to be refrigerated much but can't freeze.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, LOUIS WHITELEY <octoraro1@...> wrote:

I took Harcove to be a contraction of Harsimus Cove on the PRR in/near Jersey City, NJ.  I don't know the details, but the 1953 PRR Through Freight Schedule shows (via carfloat and lighter, I believe) that it served "New York and Brooklyn piers and stations"; New York "Piers 27-28"; and several car forwarding companies including  Clipper Carloading, P&A Shippers Assn., and National Carloading -- Piers 49-50; and Terminal Freight and Springmeier -- 37th St. Yard.

I would have thought Harsimus Cove was a destination for fruit, not an origin.  Might this suggest that it was out-of-season imports from South America?

Lou Whiteley
Lawrenceville, NJ




________________________________
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sat, December 19, 2009 3:45:40 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Orange & Lemons Shipped West

 

You don't say where Harcove is (I can't find any such place on a map)
but am I right to assume this is somewhere EAST of St Louis/Chicago/ etc?

Anywho, I strongly doubt any unspoiled citrus would be travelling west
through Enola PA to the west coast. Makes no sense at all.


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Re: Orange & Lemons Shipped West

LOUIS WHITELEY <octoraro1@...>
 

I took Harcove to be a contraction of Harsimus Cove on the PRR in/near Jersey City, NJ.  I don't know the details, but the 1953 PRR Through Freight Schedule shows (via carfloat and lighter, I believe) that it served "New York and Brooklyn piers and stations"; New York "Piers 27-28"; and several car forwarding companies including  Clipper Carloading, P&A Shippers Assn., and National Carloading -- Piers 49-50; and Terminal Freight and Springmeier -- 37th St. Yard.

I would have thought Harsimus Cove was a destination for fruit, not an origin.  Might this suggest that it was out-of-season imports from South America?

Lou Whiteley
Lawrenceville, NJ




________________________________
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sat, December 19, 2009 3:45:40 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Orange & Lemons Shipped West

 

You don't say where Harcove is (I can't find any such place on a map)
but am I right to assume this is somewhere EAST of St Louis/Chicago/ etc?

Anywho, I strongly doubt any unspoiled citrus would be travelling west
through Enola PA to the west coast. Makes no sense at all.


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Re: Railway Gazette and Railway Age

Douglas Harding <dharding@...>
 

Rich if you did the index in Lotus123, then it is digitized. Quattro Pro can open old Lotus123 files, and then save them as Excel
or other spreadsheet formats. Do you still have the file? If so it would be easy to convert it to a format many could enjoy.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org


Union Pacific PS-1 box car a bit of a "celebrity"

Scott Pitzer
 

The book "Celebrity Stew" is by Leo Pearlstein, who did a lot of P.R. work for food- and cooking-related clients in the 1950s-1970s. There are photos from his work with Steve Allen, Bob Hope, Jayne Mansfield, Phyllis Diller, and many others.
And then there's U.P. box car 126410, being tugged along by a blonde in a swimsuit, who's using a roll of Alcoa aluminum foil as part of her "rope," to prove how durable the product is.
Scott Pitzer


Re: Orange & Lemons Shipped West

Tim O'Connor
 

You don't say where Harcove is (I can't find any such place on a map)
but am I right to assume this is somewhere EAST of St Louis/Chicago/etc?

Anywho, I strongly doubt any unspoiled citrus would be travelling west
through Enola PA to the west coast. Makes no sense at all.

Jerry Stewart had a funny story at Naperville about receiving a reefer
from the east that had not been fully unloaded even though it was "empty".
He re-consigned the car to the receiver who had failed to unload it, and
the receiver was billed for the now "loaded" car and had to empty the
rotten produce. He said the receiver never made that mistake again.

On the other hand, produce travelled West all the time on the SP. Every
train from Salinas towards Roseville and the Overland Route began as a
Westbound movement, since it had to move in the direction of San Francisco
before it became Eastbound (away from San Francisco).

Tim O'connor

I have some mid-1960s wheel reports from various trains. I have one wheel report of train SWC1 eastbound from "Harcove" to Enola with about 70 reefers of various fruits. Lots of PFE, SFRD, and other reefers on this train, Most of the PFE and Santa Fe cars are loaded with lemons, oranges and melons.
All of the Santa Fe cars are marked for Los Angeles, while the PFE cars are split for St Louis, Chicago, and L.A.
Dave Hopson


Re: Railway Gazette and Railway Age

leakinmywaders
 

My wife is a librarian, and if she wasn't I would probably not be aware of EBSCO (poke around at ebsco.com), a firm that offers both subscription services, searchable indexes and electronic accession of a vast field of periodicals. At least some of their indexes include Railway Age and other Simmons-Boardman pubs, though I haven't been able to confirm how far back in time those might go. EBSCO provides professional services to libraries, but some librarians grant patrons direct or supported access to the EBSCO research services they subscribe to. The specialized indexes like those that would include Railway Age (business, engineering, transportation) might only be subscribed by some academic and well-endowed reference libraries (like OSU's). And EBSCO subscriptions do get dropped when library budgets are cut, so it's harder to get to it every year.

So ask around. There's no doubt that Railway Age, like virtually all durable periodical journals, has been indexed in searchable format-- but getting to that index might take some doing. If you're really lucky you'll locate a hot reference librarian who's been around the block and is fluent in EBSCO and will do the hard work for you. Best,

Chris Frissell
Polson, MT

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Al and Patricia Westerfield" <westerfield@...> wrote:

Richard - I did that to see CBCs at the Crerar Library in Chicago. By mistake I showed up at the distribution center where I saw troglodytes heaving priceless volumes off a truck in the most careless way, spilling books, tearing bindings, etc. Good luck.... - Al Westerfield
----- Original Message -----
From: richtownsend@...
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, December 18, 2009 5:03 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Railway Gazette and Railway Age



Thanks to all who have replied so far on this matter. The only "local" library of which I am aware that carries any of these is the Oregon State University library, and they have the issues from 1918-1948 in off-site storage. You have to request them to bring them to the library. Since the library is about a two-hour drive away and you have to ask for items in storage in person the day before you want to use them I was hoping to avoid having to ask for all 31 volumes just on the hope that something relevant exists.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon

-----Original Message-----
From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Fri, Dec 18, 2009 11:14 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Railway Gazette and Railway Age

Richard Townsend wrote:
> Here's what I suspect is a forlorn hope: is there a comprehensive
> index to these publications? If not, other than by going through
> each issue, how does one find anything about, say, a steam era
> freight car? If there are annual indices, and they collected
> somewhere?

I"m not aware of a comprehensive index. The publications
themselves prepared quite good and detailed annual indices, and these
have usually been bound into the front of annual bound volumes at
libraries. I have used them quite successfully over the years, and
have found them accurate and complete.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Orange & Lemons Shipped West (Lemons From Yuma)

Douglas Harding <dharding@...>
 

Ed from the photo referenced, it appears the car is sitting on wood blocks placed under the journal boxes. Further it appears a
permanent jacking device is trackside opposite the loading door. The procedure would be lift up one side of the car, tilting it
toward the dock, place wood blocks under the journal boxes. Very similar to using a floor jack to lift up a car, then placing jack
stands to ensure the car does not fall if the jack fails.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: Railway Gazette and Railway Age

Tim O'Connor
 

Rich, once a publication has been converted to a PDF (typically
by OCR software) then indexing can be done automatically by dozens
of available tools including Google Desktop -- you can point your
personal Google Desktop at a PDF collection in an offline archive
for example, and it will read and index the documents for you.
Of course, the worldwide Google search engine will do the same,
but the data you want will be buried much deeper... The only
current limitation of these indexers is poor recognition of
image files (JPEG etc) but in another 10-15 years I think that
automatic recognition and indexing of railroad images (as well
as all other images) will be very common.

There's an interesting article on the "Fourth Paradigm" in today's
New York Times, how science and analysis are being transformed by
data mining software tools. Someone is bound to develop "brilliant"
software that can read a magazine and recognize ads and distinguish
between different types of content and produce specialized indexes.

Tim O'Connor

At 12/18/2009 08:38 PM Friday, you wrote:
Friends,
Such an index would be a really nice addition to our knowledge base,
but to do it would be very time consuming.
Back in the 1980's I did an index like this in Lotus 123, but it only
dealt with every PRR entry for Railway Age, Railroad Gazette, and Railway
Age Gazette (as it was called for a few years after they merged). It took
up over 80 pages. I've never digitized it, but still today refer to it
often. There was a limited publication of it (i.e. about 6 copies). The
PRRT&HS archives have one, as does the U of M transportation library. A similar
index of every freight car article would be wonderful, but I can't imagine
anyone having the time to do it all. It took me over two years collecting
the PRR data and organizing it. Maybe today in the age of fast computers
someone will figure out a way? I recall it took my desktop all afternoon to
sort the pages out back then. I'd like to eventually update the index to
include advertisements that were PRR oriented.
Lacking access to a PDF copy machine I can't offer the index online,
but if anyone wants to pay the cost of a hard copy I would gladly go to the
copy shop and produce one.
A side light of this was that Railroad Gazette was the more advanced
magazine of the day (early 20th century), but Railway Age had began in
Chicago a number of years earlier and had the "bragging rights" as the oldest
such magazine in publication. Once merged, the name became Railroad Age
Gazette, but morphed back to Railway Age, so that it could claim such an early
date as it's first issue. A third magazine, Railway Review, also existed,
and merged into Railway Age around 1926. This all began in 1908 with the
initial merger of Railway Age, and Railroad Gazette, to become Railroad Age
Gazette, which soon became Railway Age Gazette, and then finally Railway
Age in 1917. There was no name change when Railroad Review merged into the
mix.
Rich Burg


Re: Railway Gazette and Railway Age

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Al Westerfield wrote:
Richard - I did that to see CBCs at the Crerar Library in Chicago. By mistake I showed up at the distribution center where I saw troglodytes heaving priceless volumes off a truck in the most careless way, spilling books, tearing bindings, etc. Good luck....
You know what they say, Al -- no one should witness the making of the sausage. <g> Oh, and BTW, you can witness those exact same troglodytes (or their relatives) doing exactly the same with Christmas packages in the back of any post office.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Railway Gazette and Railway Age

Al and Patricia Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

Richard - I did that to see CBCs at the Crerar Library in Chicago. By mistake I showed up at the distribution center where I saw troglodytes heaving priceless volumes off a truck in the most careless way, spilling books, tearing bindings, etc. Good luck.... - Al Westerfield

----- Original Message -----
From: richtownsend@netscape.net
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, December 18, 2009 5:03 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Railway Gazette and Railway Age



Thanks to all who have replied so far on this matter. The only "local" library of which I am aware that carries any of these is the Oregon State University library, and they have the issues from 1918-1948 in off-site storage. You have to request them to bring them to the library. Since the library is about a two-hour drive away and you have to ask for items in storage in person the day before you want to use them I was hoping to avoid having to ask for all 31 volumes just on the hope that something relevant exists.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon

-----Original Message-----
From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@signaturepress.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Fri, Dec 18, 2009 11:14 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Railway Gazette and Railway Age

Richard Townsend wrote:
> Here's what I suspect is a forlorn hope: is there a comprehensive
> index to these publications? If not, other than by going through
> each issue, how does one find anything about, say, a steam era
> freight car? If there are annual indices, and they collected
> somewhere?

I"m not aware of a comprehensive index. The publications
themselves prepared quite good and detailed annual indices, and these
have usually been bound into the front of annual bound volumes at
libraries. I have used them quite successfully over the years, and
have found them accurate and complete.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Railway Gazette and Railway Age

Richard Townsend
 

Thanks to all who have replied so far on this matter. The only "local" library of which I am aware that carries any of these is the Oregon State University library, and they have the issues from 1918-1948 in off-site storage. You have to request them to bring them to the library. Since the library is about a two-hour drive away and you have to ask for items in storage in person the day before you want to use them I was hoping to avoid having to ask for all 31 volumes just on the hope that something relevant exists.


Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon

-----Original Message-----
From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@signaturepress.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Fri, Dec 18, 2009 11:14 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Railway Gazette and Railway Age




Richard Townsend wrote:
Here's what I suspect is a forlorn hope: is there a comprehensive
index to these publications? If not, other than by going through
each issue, how does one find anything about, say, a steam era
freight car? If there are annual indices, and they collected
somewhere?
I"m not aware of a comprehensive index. The publications
themselves prepared quite good and detailed annual indices, and these
have usually been bound into the front of annual bound volumes at
libraries. I have used them quite successfully over the years, and
have found them accurate and complete.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Orange & Lemons Shipped West

al_brown03
 

So before frozen juice was common, were juice oranges shipped as such, and juiced at their destination?

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Jim Betz wrote:
It would seem to me that if you were going to process citrus for
juice or other such uses of less than fresh fruit quality product
that the majority of that would be done fairly close to where they
are/were grown.
Absolutely right. It was true in the 1950s and is true in
Florida today. The juice plants are right there in the growing areas,
and they get the lower-graded fruit right from the packing houses.
It's worth pointing out, though, that frozen juice didn't exist
commercially before World War II. It exploded as a food category in
the late 1940s and into the 1950s, one of the things that drove
development of mechanical reefers which could attain the necessary low
temperatures.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Railway Gazette and Railway Age

Roger Hinman <rhinman@...>
 

Don't know if it's still available, but Tom Taber authored a hardbound book titled "Railroad Periodicals Index, 1831-1999 which indexes 80 different periodicals. He also published another four volumes of which libraries hold which magazines.

ISBN is 0-9603398-8-6, published by Thomas T Taber III, 504 So Main St, Muncy, PA 17756



Roger Hinman
On Dec 18, 2009, at 2:11 PM, richtownsend@netscape.net wrote:

Here's what I suspect is a forlorn hope: is there a comprehensive index to these publications? If not, other than by going through each issue, how does one find anything about, say, a steam era freight car? If there are annual indices, and they collected somewhere?

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Railway Gazette and Railway Age

water.kresse@...
 

These current digitized copies do not give magazine quality drawings or photographs as scanned.  I don't see offset-printing fringe removal software being applied to these copies and they are not doing line-drawings to 400 dpi either.



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@comcast.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, December 18, 2009 4:32:30 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Railway Gazette and Railway Age


Hopefully all these source materials will be digitized before
the last one succumbs to vandals... There are several libraries
trying to do this.

Tim O'Connor


At 12/18/2009 03:48 PM Friday, you wrote:
Al Kresset wrote:
We just ran across some of those freight car articles being ripped  
out of bound volumes at a large big ten university library.
     Finding articles ripped (or more commonly, razored) out of bound  
journals (all subjects) is far more common at university libraries  
than at public libraries -- I don't want to consider what that tells  
us about our society -- but you just have to find another source of  
the same journal, and hope they didn't get hit too.

Tony Thompson


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Red Caboose "excellent Barber S-2"

Tim O'Connor
 

Sure Andy. That's odd because almost all of my GS gons came
with this truck -- packed in a plastic bag with other detail
parts. (It's a 3-piece truck sprue.)

Tim

At 12/18/2009 03:02 PM Friday, you wrote:
I am always interested in good plain journal freight car trucks, so Tim's quote got me to search through many of my RC GS Gondola kits, both old and newer to find this gem that I was unaware of. All that my search uncovered were the ubiquitous "Bettendorf". Can someone send me a picture of this RC Barber S-2? Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA




--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@ ...> wrote:


FYI, an excellent Barber S-2 was tooled by Red Caboose. These trucks
were packaged with the GS gondola kits. This truck is an alternative
to the Branchline if you want a version without bolster wedges. But
like the Branchline it has no spring plank.

Tim O'Connor


Re: Railway Gazette and Railway Age

Tim O'Connor
 

Hopefully all these source materials will be digitized before
the last one succumbs to vandals... There are several libraries
trying to do this.

Tim O'Connor

At 12/18/2009 03:48 PM Friday, you wrote:
Al Kresset wrote:
We just ran across some of those freight car articles being ripped
out of bound volumes at a large big ten university library.
Finding articles ripped (or more commonly, razored) out of bound
journals (all subjects) is far more common at university libraries
than at public libraries -- I don't want to consider what that tells
us about our society -- but you just have to find another source of
the same journal, and hope they didn't get hit too.

Tony Thompson


Re: NYC 40' boxcar lot 703-B

Tim O'Connor
 

Bob, the Atlas truck does look sort of like an S-2 but the
'plank' may be an exaggerated ledge rather than a plank. The
truck has nowhere near the fidelity of either the RC or BL
version in the sideframes.

Sigh. I guess we'll have to wait for Brian's version... :-)

Tim O'Connor

I have this from some old notes copied from this list that the Atlas
truck is also a S-2 and has spring planks.

"HO Model Barber S-2 Stabilized Trucks Atlas 185000 (this is a version
with spring plank"

Regards,

Bob Witt


Re: CB&Q 48 foot composite mill gons

Charlie Vlk
 

I've sent Claus scans of 2 photos that I have and a drawing off list.
Charlie Vlk

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