Date   

Re: fixing yellowed decals

Benjamin Hom
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
"On Facebook a couple weeks ago someone posted pictures of BRASS models with slightly yellowed
decals they wanted to correct. As an experiment the person placed the model in direct sunlight and left
it in the spot for 36 hours (I assume in a window in the house) and then turned it around and did the same
for the other side of the car. His before and after pictures showed that the yellowing completely disappeared!

Have you ever heard of this before? Any theory or idea why sunshine exposure would correct the color?
The models were Overland factory painted covered hoppers."

This is a well-known tip in the scale modeler community - place yellowed decals in a Ziploc bag and tape it to a window exposed to direct sunlight.  It's probably UV that does the work.


Ben Hom


fixing yellowed decals

Tim O'Connor
 


On Facebook a couple weeks ago someone posted pictures of BRASS models with slightly yellowed
decals they wanted to correct. As an experiment the person placed the model in direct sunlight and left
it in the spot for 36 hours (I assume in a window in the house) and then turned it around and did the same
for the other side of the car. His before and after pictures showed that the yellowing completely disappeared!

Have you ever heard of this before? Any theory or idea why sunshine exposure would correct the color?
The models were Overland factory painted covered hoppers.

Tim O'Connor




--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: What kind of Brake Setup is this?

mark_landgraf
 

Generically speaking, in order to gain leverage, a gear box was used. This was most often seen on flat cars with drop shaft brake wheels in a post K brake era. 

Could we be looking at a gearbox mounted up high?

Mark Landgraf


On Tue, Jul 7, 2020 at 1:57 PM, Kemal Mumcu via groups.io
<kemal_mumcu@...> wrote:
Hi,

I'm building a TH&B 36' boxcar and these cars have a particular kind of brake gear I haven't seen before. K brakes were being used on the underframe and this strange brakewheel brace on the B end. Interestingly, there was no brake wheel platform to speak of. Brakewheel shaft also looks square.

Anyone know the name of this setup?

Colin Meikle


Re: Extreme Tank Car Modeling

Bob Chaparro
 

There are a lot of wreck photos, some with tank cars, on the Oklahoma Historical Society website. And so many car vs. train wreck photos it's amazing that the state wasn't completely depopulated.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Looking for tips on transferring Clover House dry transfers to decal paper

Tim O'Connor
 


tape down the dry transfer over the spot you want (so it doesn't move)

burnish with nylon or other plastic tool

apply Microscale liquid decal film

allow to dry

If you are using the alphabet sets, and want to keep letters straight, make a line in the paper with a
knife or other tool and stay on that line. burnish - coat - dry as above.





On 7/7/2020 12:46 PM, Steve and Barb Hile wrote:

I have always struggled with using dry transfer products.  What kind of tips can anyone offer as to making successful transfers of the Clover House lettering to decal paper?  Proper burnishing techniques, etc.?

 

Thanks in advance,

Steve Hile



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


SAL composite gon

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
SAL composite gon
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Bill Welch
 

Why would they not?

Bill Welch


Re: Photo: Bailed Cotton On Flat Cars

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Jon,

That's not a pistol, it is a revolver. There is a difference. I'm no expert on guns, but it looks old, and might even be Civil War-era. 

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  

On Tue, Jul 7, 2020 at 12:08 PM Jon Miller <atsfus@...> wrote:
On 7/7/2020 8:43 AM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:
Photo: Bailed Cotton On Flat Cars

    Interesting that the fellow on the far right has a pistol in his belt.  I'm wondering what this picture is really showing?

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Question - Fees For Refrigerator Cars

Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

"could not possibly have cared less" - That must have changed soon after 1960 when the PFE went in big for intermodal
reefer trailers (incl Flexi-Vans) for that very reason - to be able to earn money in both directions. But it didn't really work out
and the experiment ended around the same time period as the end of ice service.

  You are right, Tim, the entire business model for the PFE trailers was to capture westward loads in addition to produce eastward. I was referring to reefers, both ice and mechanical.

Tony Thompson




Re: Question - Fees For Refrigerator Cars

Tim O'Connor
 


"
could not possibly have cared less" - That must have changed soon after 1960 when the PFE went in big for intermodal
reefer trailers (incl Flexi-Vans) for that very reason - to be able to earn money in both directions. But it didn't really work out
and the experiment ended around the same time period as the end of ice service.


On 7/7/2020 2:55 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
       All major reefer operators had agents in big cities to keep in contact with yardmasters and remind them to get those empties home. A PFE manager I interviewed said such an agent would call daily, with a list of the PFE cars in each yard in his territory. PFE, getting paid mileage loaded or empty, and often facing tight car supply in their loading territory, could not possibly have cared less about westbound loads.

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Extreme Tank Car Modeling

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Bruce,

Just last week I posted two views of a tank car that exploded on the B&O.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Tue, Jul 7, 2020 at 12:24 PM Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:
Folks,

With respect to "extreme tank car modeling", I am looking for photos of steam era oil or gasoline tank cars that have wrecked, burnt, and possibly ruptured, for a modeling idea.

Regards,
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, July 7, 2020 11:15 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: UTLX 95870 - For Extreme Tank Car Modeling
 
Bob,

I suspect that the tank cars were carrying LPG or a similar flammable gas, not oil.  Oil burns, gas explodes, and the piece of shrapnel on this UTLX ICC 105 pressure tank car was likely the wrapper on another similar car that exploded.  Here's a You Tube video of a modern 33,000 gallon LPG tank car that caught fire and exploded in the 1980s as a result of a derailment:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-tUQTw_Vtk

Todd Sullivan


Re: Extreme Tank Car Modeling

Tony Thompson
 

Bruce Smith wrote:

With respect to "extreme tank car modeling", I am looking for photos of steam era oil or gasoline tank cars that have wrecked, burnt, and possibly ruptured, for a modeling idea.

  Here's one for ya, an event that happened when a car was steam cleaned, and the manway closed tight while the car was hot.

Tony Thompson






Re: Question - Fees For Refrigerator Cars

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

Question - Fees For Refrigerator Cars
I was told that railroads did not pay per diem for having a private company's refrigerator car (PFE, SFRD, FGEX) on their tracks. Instead, the railroad paid the company a mileage charge, whether the car was empty or not.
If this is true, what incentive did a railroad have for getting a refrigerator car back to the owner in a timely manner?

      The mileage charge was eventually replaced (I think in the early 1970s) with a conventional per diem. 
       You are right, Bob, that return incentives were small, but remember, per diem was small too. Most railroads did not regard it as a terribly big deal, except at interchange yards where cars could be dumped on the connecting railroad before midnight.
       All major reefer operators had agents in big cities to keep in contact with yardmasters and remind them to get those empties home. A PFE manager I interviewed said such an agent would call daily, with a list of the PFE cars in each yard in his territory. PFE, getting paid mileage loaded or empty, and often facing tight car supply in their loading territory, could not possibly have cared less about westbound loads.

Tony Thompson




Re: Question - Fees For Refrigerator Cars

Ken Adams
 

We also could charge a destination carrier for detention for holding a car over the time allowed in the tariff. It was up to the destination carrier to deal with the consignee over the cause of detention. In the case of delay by the carrier, it was their responsibility for reimbursing PFE for the detention costs and any damage to equipment.  The worst case I can vaguely remember was 10 300,000 series mechanical cars loaded with meat that were lost on the Penn Central for 3 months. The cars were eventually found on a side track in a yard near Philadelphia.  The refrigeration units had long run out of fuel and the contents of the cars had rotted. PC was at the time I believe in bankruptcy and there was a major legal fight over the cost of cleaning the cars which included burning the cars to eliminate the contents and interior insulation. They were returned to PFE as burned out hulks to be rebuilt. 
--
Ken Adams
Still in splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek


Re: Looking for tips on transferring Clover House dry transfers to decal paper

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi Doug, Steve, List Members,
 
It has also been my experience that burnishing 'squishes' the lettering somewhat, leading to distortion of the lettering on the final surface.
 
Thus I try to walk a fine line - burnish with just enough pressure to get good transfer, but not so much that you distort the fine lettering
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, July 07, 2020 1:28 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Looking for tips on transferring Clover House dry transfers to decal paper

Make sure you have an edge square to the lettering, so you can line up the carrier (ie paper) properly. Use a piece of Scotch tape to tape the carrier to the model, this will keep it from shifting as you rub and it will allow you to lift to view progress and be able to lay back down if not all the transfer is complete.

 

You can use a variety of things to burnish with. A soft lead pencil works, but don’t use a sharp one that might poke the carrier paper. Woodland Scenics made a large soft plastic tool that works well for large images, but is not real good for small areas or crevices in the surface. A piece of soft strip wood, like balsa, can be used.

 

Make sure you cover the complete transfer when burnishing. But don’t over do it. I like to use a pencil because then I can where I have burnished and where I have missed. Too much burnishing will cause the transfer to stick to the carrier paper instead of the model. Rub enough to get the transfer to stick to the model surface. Once the entire transfer is stuck, you can remove the carrier paper, then you can switch to a non stick carrier and press harder with a final burnishing.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Steve and Barb Hile
Sent: Tuesday, July 7, 2020 11:47 AM
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>; ResinFreightCarBuilders@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Looking for tips on transferring Clover House dry transfers to decal paper

 

I have always struggled with using dry transfer products.  What kind of tips can anyone offer as to making successful transfers of the Clover House lettering to decal paper?  Proper burnishing techniques, etc.?

 

Thanks in advance,

Steve Hile


Re: Question - Fees For Refrigerator Cars

Ken Adams
 

Bob,

I worked for PFE in the Auditors office 1970-73 and one of of my jobs was tracking car movements for missing per diem and mileage payments from railroads so I am not sure that statement is correct. I don't recall if we tracked SP-UP time and mileage but any other hauling railroad participating in a movement whether empty or load owed PFE mileage and per diem.  I also did part of the the final valuation calculations for ice cars being retired as we wound down ice protective service in 1973. 
--
Ken Adams
Still in splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek


Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Apparently, Boston & Maine boxcars made it to Florida, even at this early date!
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


ACL ventilated boxcar in the yellow paint scheme

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
ACL ventilated boxcar in the yellow paint scheme
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus  Schlund
 


Re: Trucks?

Tim O'Connor
 

Dennis

I agree, but it's the very first example of this type of Andrews truck I've ever seen - or at least, recall ever seeing.

(Can't trust my memory these days.)


On 7/7/2020 9:48 AM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
Not Vulcan, rather some sort of Andrews patent truck. Vulcan trucks had the end of the sideframe encircle the journal box, which fit in the resulting slot, and retained by a horizontal bolt through a lug on the sideframe directly behind the journal lid hinge. I'm not seeing this lug, nor does the sideframe extend far enough to encircle the outer side of the journal box. Meanwhile, although the poor quality of the photo makes it hard to see, I think I'm seeing vertical bolts alongside the journal boxes. Those are the spotting feature of the Andrews design. Andrews trucks don't have to have the horizontal strap to the bottom of the journal; some had the strap drop at a 45 deg. angle from a bracket cast on the sideframe, as here.

Dennis Storzek

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Extreme Tank Car Modeling

Matt Goodman
 

On Jul 7, 2020, at 12:24 PM, Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:

Folks,

With respect to "extreme tank car modeling", I am looking for photos of steam era oil or gasoline tank cars that have wrecked, burnt, and possibly ruptured, for a modeling idea.

Regards,
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Todd Sullivan via groups.io<sullivant41@...>
Sent: Tuesday, July 7, 2020 11:15 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: UTLX 95870 - For Extreme Tank Car Modeling
 
Bob,

I suspect that the tank cars were carrying LPG or a similar flammable gas, not oil.  Oil burns, gas explodes, and the piece of shrapnel on this UTLX ICC 105 pressure tank car was likely the wrapper on another similar car that exploded.  Here's a You Tube video of a modern 33,000 gallon LPG tank car that caught fire and exploded in the 1980s as a result of a derailment:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-tUQTw_Vtk 

Todd Sullivan

9861 - 9880 of 185102