Date   

Re: What methods do you use to add weight to an empty flatcar?

Ted Culotta
 

I may be misunderstanding, Tony, but your calculation is "unfettered" whereas if you have a finite space to fill and you use larger rather than smaller "chunks" then you can't get as many in the finite space. I'll fit a pulverized sugar cube between center sills a lot more effectively than I will a solid sugar cube of the same volume. 

Cheers,
Ted

Ted Culotta
Speedwitch Media
P.O. Box 392, Guilford, CT 06437


Re: PRR X31A facts you want to know

Chuck Cover
 

  Sounds like a good solution.  Thanks Ben

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM


Re: What methods do you use to add weight to an empty flatcar?

Tony Thompson
 

Peter Weiglin wrote:

Weights and lead shot -- I started thinking (always dangerous).  Smallest shot packs more densely.  It follows that lead powder would be densest of all.

     Actually, no. If all the shot is the same size, the PROPORTION of the space that is empty is identical for any chosen size. Of course the voids are much smaller with smaller shot, but there are many more of them.

Tony Thompson




Re: What Is This Fellow Doing?

Dave Parker
 

To me, the most important detail in this photo is the absolutely shredded board that is the route-card holder.  A great case for adding this detail using basswood rather than styrene.  The grainier the better!
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Photo: Boxed Automobiles On Flatcars

Dave Parker
 

If you look at the Wiki pages for both Nash and Hudson/Essex, there is quite a bit of information about exports to both Oz and NZ.  One thing that caught my eye was this:

"As was the practice for all car brands during the early 20th Century, the chassis and engines were imported and the bodies were locally built by Australian coach builders".

So, at least in some instances, not only were the cars "knocked down" for shipping, but were also comprised of only the chassis, motor, and running gear.  I guess you wouldn't need a very big crate for that.

Back to the freight cars:  given the build date, the wooden frame components, and the vanishingly small numbers of these cars by 1930 (including the second C&NW car), I would be surprised if this photo dates much past 1925.  Best guess is that it post-dates the war, so that narrows the window to ~7 years , +/-.

--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: What Is This Fellow Doing?

Bob Chaparro
 

It still looks like he is holding a chalk stick to me.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: Boxed Automobiles On Flatcars

David North
 

This might be a red herring, but Bennett & Woods were the Australian distributor for Kelvinator in the early part of the 20th Century.

They were a leading company in the motor trade here in Australia, but more spare parts than new cars.

Wasn’t Kelvinator part of the Nash brand?

Coincidently, B&W were the Australian distributor for Harley Davison from 1915 and BSA motorbikes.

(Nothing to do with Nash, just something I found while researching around this photo)

 

I must admit, I thought the boxes looked a little small for cars.

 

Rupert, do you know who the NZ distributors were for Kelvinator before Fisher & Paykell took the line on the late 30s?

I wonder if Bennett & Woods had an NZ Division?

 

Again, I may be way off on this.

Cheers

Dave North

Sydney

Australia


Re: PRR X31A facts you want to know

vincent altiere <steel77086@...>
 

Thanks Ben.

Vince Altiere


-----Original Message-----
From: Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@realstmfc.groups.io>; main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Jun 19, 2020 11:01 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR X31A facts you want to know

Vince Altiere asked:
"Did you use 1/2 inch tape on your car?? I would think 1/4 inch would be better. Please let me know."

As Tim posted, you trim it as necessary.


Ben Hom


Re: C&O Burro Crane Photos

mofwcaboose <MOFWCABOOSE@...>
 

Locomotive cranes  were found on the C&O, though apparently not in the numbers seen on some other railroads. In contrast to the meticulous  listing of C&O's wreckers, data on smaller cranes is very scattered and hard to find.

I personally only photographed one  crane; RC-24, an Industrial Works/Industrial Brownhoist Model N of at least 60 tons capacity used for bridge work.

Burro cranes are a special case. They are usually numbered in with the track machines (such as tampers, spike drivers, etc.), and the numbers  tend to be scattered all over. Lifting capacities are tied to the  model number, which can be found cast into the rear of the cab, under the trade name "Burro". For example. a Model 30 is good for 7½ tons.

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL



---Original Message-----
From: Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Jun 18, 2020 10:39 am
Subject: [RealSTMFC] C&O Burro Crane Photos

Friends,

Today I'm sharing six photos of C&O Burro cranes. All these photos were taken in the 1980s or 1990s, most at Charlottesville, but two views are of the same crane at Gladstone (front and rear). I don't know for certain when these cranes were built, but I suspect that most date from the 1950s and so are within our timeframe. 

Strangely, I've never seen any bigger C&O cranes, though they certainly had some large machines. I would not be surprised if there is/was one stationed at Clifton Forge, and possibly another at Newport News or Richmond.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆 


Re: PRR X31A facts you want to know

Benjamin Hom
 

Vince Altiere asked:
"Did you use 1/2 inch tape on your car?? I would think 1/4 inch would be better. Please let me know."

As Tim posted, you trim it as necessary.


Ben Hom


Re: PRR X31A facts you want to know

vincent altiere <steel77086@...>
 

Hello Ben,

Did you use 1/2 inch tape on your car?? I would think 1/4 inch would be better. Please let me know.

Vince Altiere


-----Original Message-----
From: Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Jun 19, 2020 9:45 am
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR X31A facts you want to know

Tim O'Connor wrote: 
"Method #5 - plastic self adhesive tape from an electronic label maker - easier to apply than
the bare metal foil and can be stretched a little if necessary. Easily cut into shapes (gusset plates, etc.)"

Chuck Cover asked:
"Can you give us more information on this product?  I am not sure what you are describing."

Here's an example - Dymo sells a similar product for their label makers:

This isn't the old thick embossed label stock for the manual hand-held label makers - this is a peel-and-stick printable tape.  It works nicely - here's a Walthers (ex-Train Miniature) Class X29 boxcar that has patch panels made from this material.  It was a bit difficult getting it over the large rivets of the old model, but I do like the effect more than decals (which tend to disappear under the paint) and Bare-Metal Foil (which I find to be too subtle).


Ben Hom
   


Re: PRR X31A facts you want to know

Benjamin Hom
 

Tim O'Connor wrote: 
"Method #5 - plastic self adhesive tape from an electronic label maker - easier to apply than
the bare metal foil and can be stretched a little if necessary. Easily cut into shapes (gusset plates, etc.)"

Chuck Cover asked:
"Can you give us more information on this product?  I am not sure what you are describing."

Here's an example - Dymo sells a similar product for their label makers:

This isn't the old thick embossed label stock for the manual hand-held label makers - this is a peel-and-stick printable tape.  It works nicely - here's a Walthers (ex-Train Miniature) Class X29 boxcar that has patch panels made from this material.  It was a bit difficult getting it over the large rivets of the old model, but I do like the effect more than decals (which tend to disappear under the paint) and Bare-Metal Foil (which I find to be too subtle).


Ben Hom
   


Re: PRR X31A facts you want to know

Chuck Cover
 

RE: Method #5 - plastic self adhesive tape from an electronic label maker - easier to apply than
the bare metal foil and can be stretched a little if necessary. Easily cut into shapes (gusset plates etc)

Tim,  can you give us more information on this product?  I am not sure what you are describing.  Thanks

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM


Re: What methods do you use to add weight to an empty flatcar?

Peter Weiglin
 

Weights and lead shot -- I started thinking (always dangerous).  Smallest shot packs more densely.  It follows that lead powder would be densest of all.

Turns out that lead  powder is used to add weight to golf clubs, and is available (except, it seems, in eco-freaky California)  I bought a  pound of it for about ten bucks.

Drip CA or matte medium into the cavity, and add lead powder.  Works.

Of course, for things like flat cars, sheet lead, 1/16" thick, is sold for roofing purposes,  Cut to shape.  Use two layers if necessary and possicle.

Also useful for replacing or auglenting the weights in any kind of car.

Peter Weiglin


PRR X31A facts you want to know

Andy Carlson
 

Steel wool takes a lot of the shine off which makes paint adhesion better. I think years ago I tried painting an unscuffed trim with Accupaint with 30 percent added auto finish supply shop's universal flex additive and that seemed to work well at the time. I have only white and chrome Monokote Trim and never have painted the chrome.

The chrome is used for making stainless steel using the Highliners' Paul Lubliner's technique of stainless steel replication in HO scale. Basically he uses a very thin lacquer wash of purple over chrome. Works on plastic vacumm chrome as well, but totally a failure on fine grounded pigment silver or aluminum paint. Needs to be 100 percent mirror-reflective smooth to work well.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Thursday, June 18, 2020, 6:51:41 PM PDT, Richard Townsend via groups.io <richtownsend@...> wrote:


Does it take paint well?

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Andy Carlson <midcentury@...>
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Jun 18, 2020 5:47 pm
Subject: [RealSTMFC] PRR X31A facts you want to know

Or equally useful, the very thin polymer peel & stick product, Monokote Trim. An RC item which I am constantly finding plenty of uses for it. Sticks well and holds rivet impressions. It is available in dozens of different colors, so a patch color choice may eliminate paint touch-up. About 3 x 30 inches and less than $7.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

_._,_._,_


Re: Photo: Boxed Automobiles On Flatcars

Rupert Gamlen
 

As New Zealand’s population was so small, it did not have its own vehicle manufacturers, so vehicle were either shipped here complete or partially disassembled, crated, transported by rail and then shipped here for reassembly. Later, some parts were manufactured within NZ and completely knocked down cars (“CKD’s”), minus those parts which were to be locally sourced, were imported.

“B&W” and “Auckland” would have been the shipping marks, which would have appeared on the bill of lading and on the ship’s manifest to identify the intended recipient. I’ve looked on-line but can’t find a local company with those initials to help with dating the photo.

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Richard Townsend via groups.io
Sent: Friday, 19 June 2020 12:35 pm
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Boxed Automobiles On Flatcars

 

Could B&W be the receiving company?

Richard Townsend

Lincoln City, OR

 

_._,_._,_


Re: PRR X31A facts you want to know

Richard Townsend
 

Does it take paint well?

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Andy Carlson <midcentury@...>
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Jun 18, 2020 5:47 pm
Subject: [RealSTMFC] PRR X31A facts you want to know

Or equally useful, the very thin polymer peel & stick product, Monokote Trim. An RC item which I am constantly finding plenty of uses for it. Sticks well and holds rivet impressions. It is available in dozens of different colors, so a patch color choice may eliminate paint touch-up. About 3 x 30 inches and less than $7.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Thursday, June 18, 2020, 5:09:06 PM PDT, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



Method #5 - plastic self adhesive tape from an electronic label maker - easier to apply than
the bare metal foil and can be stretched a little if necessary. Easily cut into shapes (gusset plates etc)


this is super easy and the rivets below show through, make it look appropriately riveted!






Re: PRR X31A patch panels

Tony Thompson
 

On some X29 models, I applied strips of 0.005-inch styrene. It's exaggerated but does show up.

Tony Thompson




Re: PRR X31A facts you want to know

Tim O'Connor
 

Andy

Cool! I'd never heard of this before. I see 5" x 36" sheets for sale for $2.99 - from an actual hobby shop! :-D

https://www.centralhobbies.com/cat4.php?cat=2&subcat=13&sub2cat=7




On 6/18/2020 8:47 PM, Andy Carlson wrote:
Or equally useful, the very thin polymer peel & stick product, Monokote Trim. An RC item which I am constantly finding plenty of uses for it. Sticks well and holds rivet impressions. It is available in dozens of different colors, so a patch color choice may eliminate paint touch-up. About 3 x 30 inches and less than $7.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: PRR X31A facts you want to know

Bill Welch
 

On Thu, Jun 18, 2020 at 08:14 PM, Brian Carlson wrote:
Before anybody gets really annoyed at Bruce for number two. He meant archer panel line decals. Archer also makes weld line decals which are meant for armor guys and you definitely don’t want to use In HO scale

Brian J. Carlson--------------------------------------------
2) archer weld line decals (Bill W's favorite way right now)
 
Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
 
NO, the Decals Bruce is referring are Archer's Aircraft Panel Lines that I use to represent weld lines. They are printed in three sizes and I use the narrowest set. Here are photos showing their application on a Sunshine X28A.

Bill Welch

9881 - 9900 of 184475