Date   

Re: Requesting instructions for Wright Trak Seaboard V10

Clark Cooper
 

Thanks to everyone who responded to my request. While I’m not a y'all road modeler, one of these neat cars could occasionally make an appearance.

-Clark Cooper

On Jan 26, 2020, at 6:31 PM, Allen Cain <Allencaintn@...> wrote:

Clark,

I suspect that you already got what you were looking for but here is another copy of the instructions and a few pictures that I have collected off of the internet. If you have other pics I would appreciate copies.

Allen Cain


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR X28A

Mont Switzer
 

During the early 1990's I made regular visits to Altoona, PA on business. While there I observed a metal building being built in an industrial area. It was sort of like your typical steel building except the vertical members were old freight car center sills. I was told they were previously under PRR cars, maybe the X28's and X29's of which you speak.

Considering the sills probably came via a scrapper they could have been around for a while. The center sills didn’t look very good in this application, but they were obviously overbuilt for this purpose.

Montford L. Switzer
President
Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.
Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.
mswitzer@...
(765) 836-2914

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gatwood, Elden J SAD
Sent: Monday, January 27, 2020 7:56 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR X28A

Ron;

Yes. Those X29, and X28A that did not get chosen for the X29B, X29D, X29E, X29F, and X29G rebuilding campaigns were being set aside for scrapping, from the late fifties thru sixties, when they were scrapping tens of thousands of less-than-useful size or condition cars. There were thousands of X28A and X29 in deadlines awaiting either rebuilding or the scrap heap. Obviously condition was everything, but numbers overwhelmed need for standard 40' box cars.

Yards like Pitcairn and E Altoona were choked with deadline cars. There are photos in some books, but it was nothing like in-person.

All these choices led to the PRR freight car shortage of the early sixties.

An X28A in SK would have been extremely unusual.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of anthony wagner
Sent: Saturday, January 25, 2020 5:45 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR X28A

Ron, I'm guessing but I think advanced age and inadequate cubic and weight capacity doomed these cars. By the late 50s 50 foot box cars were becoming the norm, often with 70 ton capacity, so older cars were disposed of as soon as they could be economically replaced. Also, though I'm not sure when, the AAR changed the longevity rule from 50 to 40 years but that also must have had an impact.Tony


On Saturday, January 25, 2020, 3:08:21 PM CST, mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...> wrote:


Thanks for all the really specific replies. I'm comfortable with doing the X28A in SK, probably well-weathered, if I decide to do it at all. I'm also working on an X26C, an X29B and an X29D, all F&C. (I like to do some similar cars at once, which is a small labor-saving advantage at least with regard to research and assembly technique.) And I have enough decals I should be able to make some good choices when I'm at the lettering stage.

My Westerfield 1/59 ORER shows 2913 X28A. I have a hard copy ORER from 1961 but it's at my other house so I can't check it. I'm really interested in the precipitous decline in the numbers of X28A after 1958 as shown in the prr.railfan.net page, so I was wondering if large numbers of these cars were being condemned or at least being gathered for scrapping rather than being in free interchange during this time.

Ron Merrick


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR X28A

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Ron;

Yes. Those X29, and X28A that did not get chosen for the X29B, X29D, X29E, X29F, and X29G rebuilding campaigns were being set aside for scrapping, from the late fifties thru sixties, when they were scrapping tens of thousands of less-than-useful size or condition cars. There were thousands of X28A and X29 in deadlines awaiting either rebuilding or the scrap heap. Obviously condition was everything, but numbers overwhelmed need for standard 40' box cars.

Yards like Pitcairn and E Altoona were choked with deadline cars. There are photos in some books, but it was nothing like in-person.

All these choices led to the PRR freight car shortage of the early sixties.

An X28A in SK would have been extremely unusual.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of anthony wagner
Sent: Saturday, January 25, 2020 5:45 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] PRR X28A

Ron, I'm guessing but I think advanced age and inadequate cubic and weight capacity doomed these cars. By the late 50s 50 foot box cars were becoming the norm, often with 70 ton capacity, so older cars were disposed of as soon as they could be economically replaced. Also, though I'm not sure when, the AAR changed the longevity rule from 50 to 40 years but that also must have had an impact.Tony


On Saturday, January 25, 2020, 3:08:21 PM CST, mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...> wrote:


Thanks for all the really specific replies. I'm comfortable with doing the X28A in SK, probably well-weathered, if I decide to do it at all. I'm also working on an X26C, an X29B and an X29D, all F&C. (I like to do some similar cars at once, which is a small labor-saving advantage at least with regard to research and assembly technique.) And I have enough decals I should be able to make some good choices when I'm at the lettering stage.

My Westerfield 1/59 ORER shows 2913 X28A. I have a hard copy ORER from 1961 but it's at my other house so I can't check it. I'm really interested in the precipitous decline in the numbers of X28A after 1958 as shown in the prr.railfan.net page, so I was wondering if large numbers of these cars were being condemned or at least being gathered for scrapping rather than being in free interchange during this time.

Ron Merrick


Re: Video of someone assembling a boxcar

Jack Mullen
 

Boy will they be surprised when they find out that boxcar kit is actually a reefer. I suppose it was ebayed and not in the original box.  ;^)

Jack Mullen


Re: Car End Data

radiodial868
 

Westerfield instruction sheets rarely show car end data, no matter the era, even in as-built lettering. No help there.
Perusing all the Focus on Freight Cars books (images are 1930's) and the Steam Era Freight Car Reference Manual, I've decided to do whatever feels right, and no one can really argue!  (as long as the car had the listed features). But by 1939, they were rare, so that's the plan I will stay with. The equipment data decals mostly appear on decal sheets where the original builders photos or livery drawings were available, but appeared to not stick around much longer after 1927 as Dave mentions, with the possible exception of AB Brake conversions.
Thanks to all that replied,
RJ Dial


Re: Photos: 140 Foot Tank On 3 Flatcars (edited message)

Ralph W. Brown
 

Edited message follows:
 
Hi john, et al.,
 
Drawing from your listing of possible candidates, and being a certified (or maybe certifiable) SPF, I did a little research regarding the PRR cars listed.
 
The hundred PRR Class F30 50’ flat cars numbered 470100-470199 were built in 1929 of riveted construction using pressed steel shapes and rode on a single pair of PRR 2E-F4 or 2E-F4A trucks.  In 1942, most were upgraded to 190,000 lbs. capacity with the application of AB brakes and 2F-F4 trucks.  The nearest flat car in the first two images (outside the plant) clearly are not PRR Class F30 flat cars.  See: Pennsylvania Railroad Flat Cars Revenue & Work Equipment, 1881 to 1968 by Elden Gatwood and Al Buchan, pp. 43-44.
 
PRR 470200-470202 were PRR Class F34 flat cars.  PRR 470200 and 470201 were railroad built at Altoona in 1938, and PRR 470202 followed in 1943.  These cars had a capacity of 375,000 lbs.  They each has two sets of AB brakes and rode on two sets of two PRR 2F-F3 four-wheel trucks with each set being connected by a span bolster.  Given the date of the photograph, one of these cars, especially one of the first two of them, is a strong possibility for that nearest flat in the first two images.  The stirrup steps at the corner appear to be an exact match for the car in question.  See: Pennsylvania Railroad Flat Cars Revenue & Work Equipment, 1881 to 1968 by Elden Gatwood and Al Buchan, pp. 61-63.
 
PRR Class F36 consisted of the thirty flat cars numbered 470205-470235.  The cars date from 1940, each had a capacity of 250,000 lbs., and were of welded construction.  Inasmuch as they rode on PRR 3F-F3 six-wheel Buckeye trucks, they are not candidates for the car in question.  See: Pennsylvania Railroad Flat Cars Revenue & Work Equipment, 1881 to 1968 by Elden Gatwood and Al Buchan, pp. 65-68.
 
Incidentally, I’d recommend Elden’s and Al’s PRR flat car book to anyone interested in PRR flat cars.  It’s my go to resource on the subject.  This duo also authored a similarly titled book on PRR gondolas that is my go to source on that subject.
 
Hope that helps.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: John Barry
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 7:37 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 140 Foot Tank On 3 Flatcars
 

There aren’t many possibilities.  We can eliminate the short FM and FG cars, as well as the FD and FW cars.  That leaves the following FM flats from the Oct44 ORER list of Heavy Capacity Flat Cars

C&O 80950-80959             56’9

Erie 7220-7224   50’9

NYC 499000, 499007       40’10

NYC 499015-499019         35’6 (probably not)

NYC 499035-499039         34’8 (probably not)

NYC 499041-499042         47’

NYC&StL 2900-2901         50’9

PRR 470100-470199         50”

PRR 470200-470202         45’

PRR 470206-470235         50’

P&LE 6885-6889                36’7

SP 44091-44094                 45’

And a longer FG

C&NW 48051, 48053       45’

I'm not familiar with all of the HD flats, but this should narrow the search as it's likely that several of the above don't have the double truck bolsters.
 
John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines
Golden Gates & Fast Freights
Lovettsville, VA
 
707-490-9696
 
PO Box 44736
Washington, DC 20026-4736
 
 
On Sunday, January 26, 2020, 06:32:23 PM EST, Jack Mullen <jack.f.mullen@...> wrote:
 
 
On Sun, Jan 26, 2020 at 12:09 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Can anyone see whose flat cars they are? I can't read any of the cars.
No luck, the scans are rather low-rez and details just disappear into pixel legos as I zoom in.  What may be reporting marks  appear just left of center of the left-hand car in the first photo. That area resolves to what seem to be three characters.
This car, closest to the camera in the two outdoor photos, seems to have a cast steel body, which brings the Commonwealth CNW/PRR/SP 44' 200 ton cars that have been modeled in several scales to mind. However, unless it's an illusion caused by photo lens and angle, the car appears somewhat longer, and the trucks seem to have the proportions of 5'6"+ wb, rather than the 5'0" of at least the PRR and C&NW cars.  The truck sideframes are flat-topped, lacking the characteristic arch of the 5'0" 100 ton trucks.  So maybe a similar cast car, but say 47-50' length?
Who else had similar cars? NYC and D&H come to mind, but I don't have hard data or photos at hand.
The car bearing the other end of the load, closest to the camera, is different - riveted construction, and with stake pockets, which we don't often see on very heavy-duty flats.  The welding flare obscures what I think are the marks and number.
Hope these clues help somebody recognize these...

BTW, it's not " William Boiler & Manufacturing Company", but "William Bros...", and Bros is a name, not the abbreviation for brothers. They also made snowplows, some for railroads.

Jack Mullen


Re: Photos: 140 Foot Tank On 3 Flatcars

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi john, et al.,
 
Drawing from your listing of possible candidates, and being a certified (or maybe certifiable) SPF, I did a little research regarding the PRR cars listed.
 
The hundred PRR Class F30 50’ flat cars numbered 470100-470199 were built in 1929 of riveted construction using pressed steel shape and rose on a single pair of PRR 2E-F4 or 2E-F4A trucks.  In 1942, most were upgraded to 190,000 lbs. capacity with the application of AB brakes and 2F-F4 trucks.  The nearest flat car in the first two images, outside the plant, clearly are not PRR Class F30 flat cars.  See: Pennsylvania Railroad Flat Cars Revenue & Work Equipment, 1881 to 1968 by Elden Gatwood and Al Buchan, pp. 43-44.  See: Pennsylvania Railroad Flat Cars Revenue & Work Equipment, 1881 to 1968 by Elden Gatwood and Al Buchan, pp. 61-63.
 
PRR 470200-470202 were PRR Class F34.  PRR 470200 and 470201 were railroad built at Altoona in 1938, and PRR 470202 followed in 1943.  These cars had a capacity of 375,000 lbs.  They each has two sets of AB brakes ad rode on two sets of two PRR 2F-F3 trucks with each set being connected by a span bolster.  Given the date of the photograph, these cars, especially the first two of them, are a strong possibility for that nearest flat in the first two images.  The stirrup steps at the corner appear to be an exact match for the car in question.  See: Pennsylvania Railroad Flat Cars Revenue & Work Equipment, 1881 to 1968 by Elden Gatwood and Al Buchan, pp. 61-63.
 
PRR Class F36 consisted of the thirty flat cars numbered 470205-470235.  The cars date from 1940, each had a capacity of 250,000 lbs., and were of welded construction.  Inasmuch as the rode on PRR 3F-F3 six-wheel Buckeye trucks, they are not candidates for the car in question.  See: Pennsylvania Railroad Flat Cars Revenue & Work Equipment, 1881 to 1968 by Elden Gatwood and Al Buchan, pp. 65-68.
 
Incidentally, I’d recommend Elden’s and Al’s PRR flat car book to anyone interested in PRR flat cars.  It’s my go to resource on the subject.  This duo also authored a similarly titled book on PRR gondolas that is my go to source on that subject.
 
Hope that helps.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: John Barry
Sent: Sunday, January 26, 2020 7:37 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photos: 140 Foot Tank On 3 Flatcars
 

There aren’t many possibilities.  We can eliminate the short FM and FG cars, as well as the FD and FW cars.  That leaves the following FM flats from the Oct44 ORER list of Heavy Capacity Flat Cars

C&O 80950-80959             56’9

Erie 7220-7224   50’9

NYC 499000, 499007       40’10

NYC 499015-499019         35’6 (probably not)

NYC 499035-499039         34’8 (probably not)

NYC 499041-499042         47’

NYC&StL 2900-2901         50’9

PRR 470100-470199         50”

PRR 470200-470202         45’

PRR 470206-470235         50’

P&LE 6885-6889                36’7

SP 44091-44094                 45’

And a longer FG

C&NW 48051, 48053       45’

I'm not familiar with all of the HD flats, but this should narrow the search as it's likely that several of the above don't have the double truck bolsters.
 
John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines
Golden Gates & Fast Freights
Lovettsville, VA
 
707-490-9696
 
PO Box 44736
Washington, DC 20026-4736
 
 
On Sunday, January 26, 2020, 06:32:23 PM EST, Jack Mullen <jack.f.mullen@...> wrote:
 
 
On Sun, Jan 26, 2020 at 12:09 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Can anyone see whose flat cars they are? I can't read any of the cars.
No luck, the scans are rather low-rez and details just disappear into pixel legos as I zoom in.  What may be reporting marks  appear just left of center of the left-hand car in the first photo. That area resolves to what seem to be three characters.
This car, closest to the camera in the two outdoor photos, seems to have a cast steel body, which brings the Commonwealth CNW/PRR/SP 44' 200 ton cars that have been modeled in several scales to mind. However, unless it's an illusion caused by photo lens and angle, the car appears somewhat longer, and the trucks seem to have the proportions of 5'6"+ wb, rather than the 5'0" of at least the PRR and C&NW cars.  The truck sideframes are flat-topped, lacking the characteristic arch of the 5'0" 100 ton trucks.  So maybe a similar cast car, but say 47-50' length?
Who else had similar cars? NYC and D&H come to mind, but I don't have hard data or photos at hand.
The car bearing the other end of the load, closest to the camera, is different - riveted construction, and with stake pockets, which we don't often see on very heavy-duty flats.  The welding flare obscures what I think are the marks and number.
Hope these clues help somebody recognize these...

BTW, it's not " William Boiler & Manufacturing Company", but "William Bros...", and Bros is a name, not the abbreviation for brothers. They also made snowplows, some for railroads.

Jack Mullen


Re: Requesting instructions for Wright Trak Seaboard V10

Donald B. Valentine
 

Wright Trak was furnishing instructions on a small size CD for the V-9 and V-10
cars unle he finally changed to rinted ones.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: Photos: 140 Foot Tank On 3 Flatcars

John Barry
 

There aren’t many possibilities.  We can eliminate the short FM and FG cars, as well as the FD and FW cars.  That leaves the following FM flats from the Oct44 ORER list of Heavy Capacity Flat Cars

C&O 80950-80959             56’9

Erie 7220-7224   50’9

NYC 499000, 499007       40’10

NYC 499015-499019         35’6 (probably not)

NYC 499035-499039         34’8 (probably not)

NYC 499041-499042         47’

NYC&StL 2900-2901         50’9

PRR 470100-470199         50”

PRR 470200-470202         45’

PRR 470206-470235         50’

P&LE 6885-6889                36’7

SP 44091-44094                 45’

And a longer FG

C&NW 48051, 48053       45’

I'm not familiar with all of the HD flats, but this should narrow the search as it's likely that several of the above don't have the double truck bolsters.

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736


On Sunday, January 26, 2020, 06:32:23 PM EST, Jack Mullen <jack.f.mullen@...> wrote:


On Sun, Jan 26, 2020 at 12:09 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Can anyone see whose flat cars they are? I can't read any of the cars.
No luck, the scans are rather low-rez and details just disappear into pixel legos as I zoom in.  What may be reporting marks  appear just left of center of the left-hand car in the first photo. That area resolves to what seem to be three characters.
This car, closest to the camera in the two outdoor photos, seems to have a cast steel body, which brings the Commonwealth CNW/PRR/SP 44' 200 ton cars that have been modeled in several scales to mind. However, unless it's an illusion caused by photo lens and angle, the car appears somewhat longer, and the trucks seem to have the proportions of 5'6"+ wb, rather than the 5'0" of at least the PRR and C&NW cars.  The truck sideframes are flat-topped, lacking the characteristic arch of the 5'0" 100 ton trucks.  So maybe a similar cast car, but say 47-50' length?
Who else had similar cars? NYC and D&H come to mind, but I don't have hard data or photos at hand.
The car bearing the other end of the load, closest to the camera, is different - riveted construction, and with stake pockets, which we don't often see on very heavy-duty flats.  The welding flare obscures what I think are the marks and number.
Hope these clues help somebody recognize these...

BTW, it's not " William Boiler & Manufacturing Company", but "William Bros...", and Bros is a name, not the abbreviation for brothers. They also made snowplows, some for railroads.

Jack Mullen


Re: Requesting instructions for Wright Trak Seaboard V10

Allen Cain
 

Clark,

I suspect that you already got what you were looking for but here is another copy of the instructions and a few pictures that I have collected off of the internet.  If you have other pics I would appreciate copies.

Allen Cain


Video of someone assembling a boxcar

Dave Nelson
 

Doesn’t look like a Sunshine  kit but interesting none the less as the steps are about the same.  No superglue.

 

https://videoplayer.telvue.com/player/FcqTL0OYMCGU6WlccUApyUL3twz4dm9V/media/456833

 

Dave Nelson


Re: Requesting instructions for Wright Trak Seaboard V10

Bill Welch
 

Here are a couple of Jack Parker photos made in Toronto: https://realstmfc.groups.io/g/main/photo/43681/0?p=Name,,sal+v9,20,1,0,0

Given the slight curve on the top cord of the Andrews trucks, I think the Life-Like now Walthers Andrews is good for this model.

Bill Welch


Re: Requesting instructions for Wright Trak Seaboard V10

Clark Cooper
 

Thanks Bill!

-Clark Cooper


On Jan 26, 2020, at 6:07 PM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

I have sent Gregory at Southbound Modelworkd and Decals Co. my pictorial diary of my v9/v10 build for use on his website. Photos used to be on the old resin builder Yahoo group. Hopefully they will appear soon. I can tell the the doors on the WT kit are way too thick and need to be reduced in thickness by about two-thirds for a more scale appearance. Also, if you are doing the model with vent door in vent position that part needs to be adjusted so it will sit in the door opening. For screening I used stainless steel screen material from a French Coffee press. These can be found as replacement parts from "Bodum" and other companies that sell this type of coffee brewer and on Amazon.

Bill Welch


Re: Grandt Line - San Juan - American Limited - etc

Scott
 

I will believe it when I see it from those guys.

Scott McDonald 


Re: Requesting instructions for Wright Trak Seaboard V10

Bill Welch
 

I have sent Gregory at Southbound Modelworkd and Decals Co. my pictorial diary of my v9/v10 build for use on his website. Photos used to be on the old resin builder Yahoo group. Hopefully they will appear soon. I can tell the the doors on the WT kit are way too thick and need to be reduced in thickness by about two-thirds for a more scale appearance. Also, if you are doing the model with vent door in vent position that part needs to be adjusted so it will sit in the door opening. For screening I used stainless steel screen material from a French Coffee press. These can be found as replacement parts from "Bodum" and other companies that sell this type of coffee brewer and on Amazon.

Bill Welch


Re: Grandt Line - San Juan - American Limited - etc

Ken Adams
 

I had to resort to eBay and high prices and shipping to get some critical freight door sets that were not duplicated by Tichy or any other supplier.  My local hobby shop has all but given up on SJD as a supplier. 

My advice for architectural details is to check the equivalent on Tichy's list before waiting forever for SJD to get their act together with the former Grandt Line parts.


Re: Photos: 140 Foot Tank On 3 Flatcars

Jack Mullen
 

On Sun, Jan 26, 2020 at 12:09 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Can anyone see whose flat cars they are? I can't read any of the cars.
No luck, the scans are rather low-rez and details just disappear into pixel legos as I zoom in.  What may be reporting marks  appear just left of center of the left-hand car in the first photo. That area resolves to what seem to be three characters.
This car, closest to the camera in the two outdoor photos, seems to have a cast steel body, which brings the Commonwealth CNW/PRR/SP 44' 200 ton cars that have been modeled in several scales to mind. However, unless it's an illusion caused by photo lens and angle, the car appears somewhat longer, and the trucks seem to have the proportions of 5'6"+ wb, rather than the 5'0" of at least the PRR and C&NW cars.  The truck sideframes are flat-topped, lacking the characteristic arch of the 5'0" 100 ton trucks.  So maybe a similar cast car, but say 47-50' length?
Who else had similar cars? NYC and D&H come to mind, but I don't have hard data or photos at hand.
The car bearing the other end of the load, closest to the camera, is different - riveted construction, and with stake pockets, which we don't often see on very heavy-duty flats.  The welding flare obscures what I think are the marks and number.
Hope these clues help somebody recognize these...

BTW, it's not " William Boiler & Manufacturing Company", but "William Bros...", and Bros is a name, not the abbreviation for brothers. They also made snowplows, some for railroads.

Jack Mullen


Re: Requesting instructions for Wright Trak Seaboard V10

Clark Cooper
 

Hi Bruce,

I tried that first. It has some instruction sheets, but not for this particular kit.

However, Paul Bizier came to the rescue and sent me a scan of his instruction sheet.

Thanks.
-Clark Cooper

On Jan 26, 2020, at 5:21 PM, Bruce A. Metcalf <bruce.metcalf@...> wrote:

Clark Cooper wrote:

I recently acquired a Wright Trak Seaboard V10 kit, and a note inside the box refers me to the no-longer-existent web site to download the instructions. I searched the RealSTMFC group files and messages, just in case, but did not see them. Nor could I find them on the Wayback Machine archives of the original Wright Trak web site.

Have you tried looking at the Internet Archive to see if they have the page? Go to <https://archive.org/> and enter the URL in the search field. I've been surprised at how many dead websites are stored there.

Cheers,
/ Bruce /





Re: Requesting instructions for Wright Trak Seaboard V10

Bruce A. Metcalf
 

Clark Cooper wrote:

I recently acquired a Wright Trak Seaboard V10 kit, and a note inside the box refers me to the no-longer-existent web site to download the instructions. I searched the RealSTMFC group files and messages, just in case, but did not see them. Nor could I find them on the Wayback Machine archives of the original Wright Trak web site.
Have you tried looking at the Internet Archive to see if they have the page? Go to <https://archive.org/> and enter the URL in the search field. I've been surprised at how many dead websites are stored there.

Cheers,
/ Bruce /


Re: Grandt Line - San Juan - American Limited - etc

Bill Welch
 

Ask them when they will ship the items promised to me by Grandt Line that they were not able to send me when GL handed the box of items off to them when they closed. They never answer the phone, never respond to messages or to my emails.

Bill Welch