Date   

UP/OSL/OWR&N B-50-27 box car particulars

Tim O'Connor
 

I'm currently building Red Caboose 40' box car kits:

OWR&N 189055, 189157
OSL 189631, 189771

and the diagram lists multiple types of hand brakes, and
trucks (all with spring planks) but does not break out the
appliances applied to specific car numbers. Does anyone
have that information handy? Would any of these cars have
received steel running boards by the mid 1950's? The photos
in Terry's book look like wood rb's.

It's interesting to look at the diagram specs. I'm also
building UP 184230, a B-50-21, and that diagram does spell
everything out. Interestingly, some of the B-50-21's had
all-welded ends, and there were TWO THICKNESSES of steel
applied to B-50-21 roofs! I guess they were trying to find
out whether thinner steel would be more cost effective. Also
the B-50-21's all had spring-plankless trucks, while the
later B-50-27's all had spring planks. That's the opposite
chronological order that I expected.

Unfortunately for me, the UP 184230 had a KLASING hand brake.
Oh well, I'll have to model it as a shop repair... maybe paint
it bright orange or yellow too. :-)

Tim O'Connor


Re: Union Pacific B 50-17 Boxcars, Steel Sided Rebuilds

Tim O'Connor
 

Ted Culotta made the masters for the Sunshine B-50-17, so I think
it's correct. I just looked at my Challenger B-50-17, and although
they got the 5 crossbearers and 'fishbelly' Bettendorf I-beams for
some reason they enclosed the entire thing with a riveted plate
forming a box girder -- while Ted's/Sunshine underframe has the
open twin-girder design. This is not a PFE underframe. Martin's
comment in the instructions is that the general appearance of the
underframe from the side reminds one of rebuilt PFE reefers.

Tim O'Connor

Sunshine offers (or offered) a kit of the B-50-17. It was an unnumbered, limited run "Private Stock" kit and the PDS has an extensive discussion of the underframe construction. Now, I'm not holding Sunshine up as the final arbiter on this - perhaps Martin used his PFE underframe - but the kit, and the research for it, exists.

Tom Madden


Re: Union Pacific B 50-17 Boxcars, Steel Sided Rebuilds

Paul Lyons
 

Tom,

I believe Ted Culotta did the masters for this kit. If that in fact is correct, you kow the UF is "spot on".

Paul Lyons
Laguna Niguel, CA

-----Original Message-----
From: pullmanboss <tgmadden@worldnet.att.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wed, Nov 11, 2009 11:13 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Union Pacific B 50-17 Boxcars, Steel Sided Rebuilds






Sunshine offers (or offered) a kit of the B-50-17. It was an unnumbered, limited run "Private Stock" kit and the PDS has an extensive discussion of the underframe construction. Now, I'm not holding Sunshine up as the final arbiter on this - perhaps Martin used his PFE underframe - but the kit, and the research for it, exists.

Tom Madden

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Bob McCarthy wrote:
From comments in the article, it appears that the underframe on
this group of cars was similar, if not exactly the same, as the PFE
underframe. Can anyone comment on whether this is a fact.
Well, PFE had a lot of underframes under different classes
over the years; but until the 1950s, all were 30-ton or 40-ton
underframes, so I'd doubt this 50-ton box had the SAME underframe. It
could certainly be a SIMILAR underframe.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Union Pacific B 50-17 Boxcars, Steel Sided Rebuilds

pullmanboss <tgmadden@...>
 

Sunshine offers (or offered) a kit of the B-50-17. It was an unnumbered, limited run "Private Stock" kit and the PDS has an extensive discussion of the underframe construction. Now, I'm not holding Sunshine up as the final arbiter on this - perhaps Martin used his PFE underframe - but the kit, and the research for it, exists.

Tom Madden

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Bob McCarthy wrote:
From comments in the article, it appears that the underframe on
this group of cars was similar, if not exactly the same, as the PFE
underframe. Can anyone comment on whether this is a fact.
Well, PFE had a lot of underframes under different classes
over the years; but until the 1950s, all were 30-ton or 40-ton
underframes, so I'd doubt this 50-ton box had the SAME underframe. It
could certainly be a SIMILAR underframe.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Painting Trucks

Tim O'Connor
 

Richard Hendrickson wrote

Don't have a grit blaster? Go get one. Those of us who have them
regard them as an absolutely essential modeling tool, on a par with
a good air brush.

In addition, I recently bought a Badger "air eraser" kit (just a
bottle with some grit and a tip) and I have hooked this up with my
grit booth. I find I can safely remove small amounts of lettering
with very fine control, and I've even started using it as a
weathering tool. For example, I use it to "whiten" freight car
lettering which I have hit a little too hard with grime. In another
case I had a box car with a primer coat of "galvanized metal" color
and an overcoat of box car red. I was able to remove some of the top
layer so the galvanized color showed through. Very cool!

I "paint" trucks only rarely. I grit blast, wash them, and hit them w/
alcohol washes (india ink, rust, etc). They come out great. Sometimes
I go back over with Floquil dry brush to show oil spills, etc.

Tim O'Connor


Re: Bieber cars

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
The Inside Gateway was (and remains so today) as a bridge route between the ATSF (BNSF today) and the GN (also BNSF today) - it is the only alternative to the SP (today, UP).
Entirely true. But it should be kept in perspective. In the era of this list, the Bieber route handled around 6% of SP's traffic over the Cascade Route.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Painting Trucks

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Nov 11, 2009, at 8:57 AM, Camas74 wrote:

I have painted TMW trucks with Floquil, Scalecoat 1&2, Star brand,
Pollyscale and WIndsor & Newton oils paints with no problems...
I have occasionally had problems with paint of any type wearing or
flaking off Celcon truck frames, but the solution is a simple one
which I carry out routinely: grit blast the truck frames.
Grit blasting with fine abrasive doesn't harm the detail (of course,
you want to avoid directing the abrasive into the bearing cones) and,
if what you want are grimy black/dark gray trucks with an absolutely
flat finish, that's all you need to do. When trucks need to be
painted, the flat finish left by grit blasting holds paint very
well. It's easy, only takes a few minutes, and yields a finish that
will last forever. Don't have a grit blaster? Go get one. Those of
us who have them regard them as an absolutely essential modeling
tool, on a par with a good air brush.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Union Pacific B 50-17 Boxcars, Steel Sided Rebuilds

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Bob McCarthy wrote:
From comments in the article, it appears that the underframe on this group of cars was similar, if not exactly the same, as the PFE underframe. Can anyone comment on whether this is a fact.
Well, PFE had a lot of underframes under different classes over the years; but until the 1950s, all were 30-ton or 40-ton underframes, so I'd doubt this 50-ton box had the SAME underframe. It could certainly be a SIMILAR underframe.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Bieber cars was New file uploaded to STMFC

Tim O'Connor
 

The sample is statistically meaningless, especially because it
spans such a long period of time. I mean, every 3 months there
probably were 20,000 to 30,000 cars passing through Bieber. Why
would you be surprised to know that 20 or even 30 of them were
Reading box cars, much less 5?

The Inside Gateway was (and remains so today) as a bridge route
between the ATSF (BNSF today) and the GN (also BNSF today) - it
is the only alternative to the SP (today, UP).

Tim O'Connor

At 11/11/2009 11:46 AM Wednesday, you wrote:
Tim,

Read my comments again. FIVE Reading cars would have blown me away.
Two is ho-hum yawn... and in fact, it is only one as the cars I was
excited about were really Rio Grande. Five Rio Grande would have
also been an interesting anomaly, but again, its only two... so even
with this small sample, everything is still right with the Nelson-
Gilbert model ;^) (and notice the paucity of home road cars?)

Regards
Bruce


Re: Floquil and TMW trucks

Matt S.
 

I have painted TMW trucks with Floquil, Scalecoat 1&2, Star brand, Pollyscale and WIndsor & Newton oils paints with no problems...

Matt Sugerman,
Ft. Worth, TX

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "brianleppert@..." <brianleppert@...> wrote:

Has anyone encountered problems applying Floquil paint to Tahoe Model Works trucks? I have a customer who is brush painting Floquil and getting a shiny finish, instead of flat. An overspray of Dullcoat still results shiny.

For what its worth, the trucks are molded in Celcon, the same material that Model Die Casting used to use.

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV


Re: Bieber cars was New file uploaded to STMFC

Andy Sperandeo <asperandeo@...>
 

Hi Bruce,

I've been been very interested in this, because a lot of this Bieber traffic moved to and from Southern California over the Santa Fe south of Stockton. In that light, I read the "rd" abbreviations as representing "SFRD," i.e., Santa Fe refrigerator cars. That was a very typical abbreviation, especially for anyone who also used "at" for "ATSF."

So long,

Andy

Andy Sperandeo
Executive Editor
Model Railroader magazine
asperandeo@mrmag.com
262-796-8776, ext. 461
FAX 262-796-1142


Re: 8-hatch reefers

Kenneth Montero
 

Gene,

I have a blue box Ambroid kit no. K-14 is a "C.P (Canadian Pacific) 8-Hat Reefer". The instructions say that the kit was designed and manufactured by Madewell Company, Inc., 15 Main Street, Waltham 54, Massachusetts. The instructions also give that firm as the source for spare parts, Is this name a predecessor or subsidiary of Ambroid or Northeastern (both of whom seemed to have had the same kit at different times)?

Ken Montero

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <bierglaeser@yahoo.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, November 11, 2009 10:04:56 AM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [STMFC] Re: 8-hatch reefers






There is an article in the June 1940 Ry Mechanical Engineer beginning on page 211 about CN refrigerator cars with overhead ice bunkers and 8 htches. These are all-steel, 4/5 square-corner Dreadnaught ends, hinged doors, Dalman trucks, and Ajax hand brakes. The CN built 100 with the first one completed in October 1939.

Way back when there was a Northeastern or Ambroid model of such a reefer as I now recall. I have one but it is packed for moving. My recollection is that the model had wood sides. Does anyone remember this model? Was it of a CN or CP prototype?

Gene Green
heading towards the badlands of New Mexico


Re: Bieber cars was New file uploaded to STMFC

Bruce Smith
 

Tim,

Read my comments again. FIVE Reading cars would have blown me away. Two is ho-hum yawn... and in fact, it is only one as the cars I was excited about were really Rio Grande. Five Rio Grande would have also been an interesting anomaly, but again, its only two... so even with this small sample, everything is still right with the Nelson- Gilbert model ;^) (and notice the paucity of home road cars?)

Regards
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

On Nov 11, 2009, at 10:30 AM, Tim O'Connor wrote:

Bruce

Two READING cars over 3 months at a major gateway blows you
away? This is such a tiny data sample (like a thimble of water
from a full bucket) that I asked whether it was a random sampling.

The car service rules are explicity explained in the back of an
ORER (pp 748-762 of the Jan 1953 ORER).

It's the fuzzy rule #4 -- "load.. to a District intermediate"
that makes it possible for a Reading box car to move endlessly
between District #1 (Washington-Oregon-Idaho) and District #2
(California-Nevada). I mean, which is "closer" to Pennsylvania?

Tim
I imported the data into excel, sorted by roadname and was blown away
by the number of Rg (reading) entries. Then I realized that it was
only 2 cars! Can you provide some interpretation of those movements
(especially their direction of travel)??
Received Forwarded
Rg 45200 r 252 1-Dec f 2127 1-Dec
Rg 45200 r 2017 13-Dec f 201 13-Dec

rg 43300 r 911 5-Dec f 2017 5-Dec
rg 43300 r 2126 19-Dec f 202 20-Dec
rg 43300 r 904 30-Dec f 2126 30-Dec

a couple of ATSF cars account for multiple moves as well

at 9200 r 210 11-Oct f 2019 11-Oct
at 9200 r 254 10-Nov f 2008 10-Nov
at 9200 r 2107 20-Nov f 206 20-Nov

at 5300 r 2115 14-Oct f 209 14-Oct
at 5300 r 905 24-Nov f 2127 24-Nov
at 5300 r 2007 5-Dec f 206 6-Dec

I'd be curious to see how these cars comply with the car service rules.

It looks like a nice national mix of cars <VBG>

BTW, if Rg is Reading, what is Rd?

Regards
Bruce


Re: Modeling LCL

William Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Jared,

Thank you for the LCL information that you posted. It is a great help
in understanding how the LCL operations might have been done on the
Gridley Branch with mixed trains #79-80. These were normally powered
by a motorcar.

I had been wondering if the doodlebug also carried the LCL. From what
you presented it can be assumed that it did as traveled from Ottawa,
Kansas, to Gridley, and return.

Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On Nov 10, 2009, at 9:22 PM, almabranch wrote:



Here's how it was done on the Alma branch in Kansas in the 1940's.
The motor car or the coach, baggage, and caboose car would be
spotted at the depot in the morning where the Santa Fe Trailways
truck on a Topeka-Emporia route could back up to the baggage door to
unload the LCL from the previous day and to load up the LCL for the
branch that day. LCL was freight in less than carload amounts. The
depot agent handled the paperwork. There was also the Railway
Express shipments. Railway Express was managed by the Railway
Express Agency. It was similar to UPS or FedEx today. It was an
expedited service and items shipped by Railway Express came by
passenger train and were dropped at the Burlingame depot. The depot
agent also handled the paperwork for the REA shipments and they were
loaded in the baggage compartment with the LCL. REA paid the RR to
handle their shipments. US mail was also loaded in the baggage
compartment and the PO paid the RR to handle this also. Large pieces
of personal baggage could also go into the baggage compartment.
After everything was ready to go the Alma branch mixed went up the
branch dropping off and picking up LCL, express, mail, passengers
and, perhaps, their personal baggage. The headend brakeman was in
charge of making sure all the LCL, express, and mail was dropped off
or picked up. He got a separate monthly check from the express
company for his duties. When the train got back to the depot in
Burlingame the express and mail were unloaded at the depot. The LCL
stayed in the baggage compartment to be picked up by the Santa Fe
Trailways truck the next morning which would take it to Topeka when
its route was completed. The express and mail would be put out for
the next passenger train going the direction the express or mail was
headed.

When the Alma branch train started tying up at Topeka in the late
1940s an old reefer or box car was parked by the Burlingame depot
for LCL and the Santa Fe Trailways truck loaded and unloaded it on
the Topeka-Emporia route. When the train came from Topeka to
Burlingame it coupled up the car and took it up and back down the
branch. Express and Mail came on the train from Topeka in the coach,
baggage and caboose car and the train would pick up and leave off
express and mail at each station. The headend brakeman filled his
role as before.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, michael bishop <goldrod_1@...> wrote:



Where is the fine line between LCL and REA in the handling of a
few packages at a station? I know at a freight house a LCL car could
be dropped off with the car almost full, but the load could be made
up several LCL shipment combined together for a shipment.
Thanks ofr any help.

Michael Bishop




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Bieber cars was New file uploaded to STMFC

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Nov 11, 2009, at 7:07 AM, Bruce Smith wrote:

a couple of ATSF cars account for multiple moves as well

at 9200 r 210 11-Oct f 2019 11-Oct
at 9200 r 254 10-Nov f 2008 10-Nov
at 9200 r 2107 20-Nov f 206 20-Nov

at 5300 r 2115 14-Oct f 209 14-Oct
at 5300 r 905 24-Nov f 2127 24-Nov
at 5300 r 2007 5-Dec f 206 6-Dec

I'd be curious to see how these cars comply with the car service
rules.
Bruce, those cars were equipped with auto racks and were apparently
in shuttle service from an auto assembly plant in Southern California
to a distributor in the Pacific Northwest.

BTW, if Rg is Reading, what is Rd?
Perhaps SFRD; I've seen that abbreviation before in trainmen's records.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Floquil and TMW trucks

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

I brush paint flat Floquil (old and new) on all sorts of Celcon, Delrin, and other trucks- with no problems whatsoever in attaining the desired flat finish.

When a gloss finish results from applying Floquil flat paints, it seems to be almost always due to the fact that the flattening agent in the paint remains unmixed. This commonly happens when paint is simply shaken, not mechanically stirred; and can also be relatively more common with jars of paint that have been repeatedly opened and used, with long intervening settling periods.

Dullcote glossy? Same thing.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento


Re: Bieber cars was New file uploaded to STMFC

Tim O'Connor
 

Bruce

Two READING cars over 3 months at a major gateway blows you
away? This is such a tiny data sample (like a thimble of water
from a full bucket) that I asked whether it was a random sampling.

The car service rules are explicity explained in the back of an
ORER (pp 748-762 of the Jan 1953 ORER).

It's the fuzzy rule #4 -- "load.. to a District intermediate"
that makes it possible for a Reading box car to move endlessly
between District #1 (Washington-Oregon-Idaho) and District #2
(California-Nevada). I mean, which is "closer" to Pennsylvania?

Tim

On Nov 10, 2009, at 11:07 PM, allen_282 wrote:

Tim,
These are mostly cars passing through, between the WP & GN at
Bieber.
There is one with out train info. You sort of have to know your
GN & WP steam engine numbers to help make sense of it.

The station book is organized by the last 3 digits of the car number.
The station agent(s) seem to be rather loose with there
abbreviations, like rg for rio grande, at for atsf, rd for reading,
mi for Milw (with out looking at an ORER)

So taking a line for example,

ic 32200 r 2126 10/4 f 907 907 10/4

ic car # 32200 received from train 2126(gn) 10/4/47 forwarded to
train 907(wp) 10/4/47

Some entries have multiple train/dates meaning the car past through
several times in three months. I repeat the whole entry for each
new train + date
I imported the data into excel, sorted by roadname and was blown away
by the number of Rg (reading) entries. Then I realized that it was
only 2 cars! Can you provide some interpretation of those movements
(especially their direction of travel)??
Received Forwarded
Rg 45200 r 252 1-Dec f 2127 1-Dec
Rg 45200 r 2017 13-Dec f 201 13-Dec

rg 43300 r 911 5-Dec f 2017 5-Dec
rg 43300 r 2126 19-Dec f 202 20-Dec
rg 43300 r 904 30-Dec f 2126 30-Dec

a couple of ATSF cars account for multiple moves as well

at 9200 r 210 11-Oct f 2019 11-Oct
at 9200 r 254 10-Nov f 2008 10-Nov
at 9200 r 2107 20-Nov f 206 20-Nov

at 5300 r 2115 14-Oct f 209 14-Oct
at 5300 r 905 24-Nov f 2127 24-Nov
at 5300 r 2007 5-Dec f 206 6-Dec

I'd be curious to see how these cars comply with the car service rules.

It looks like a nice national mix of cars <VBG>

BTW, if Rg is Reading, what is Rd?

Regards
Bruce


Re: SRR 100 ton cement hopper

Allen Cain <allencain@...>
 

Fred,



There was an article on these cars that was in Mainline Modeler's April,
1986 magazine. I have sent a scan of it to you to your mailbox.



Allen Cain


Re: Bieber cars was New file uploaded to STMFC

Bruce Smith
 

Du-uh! Sorry! (and of course RD is Reading, just like originally posted :^}
Bruce

On Nov 11, 2009, at 10:01 AM, gary laakso wrote:

I read the Rg as Rio Grande.

gary laakso
south of Mike Brock
vasa0vasa@earthlink.net


----- Original Message -----
From: Bruce Smith
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: 11/11/2009 10:07:47 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Bieber cars was New file uploaded to STMFC




On Nov 10, 2009, at 11:07 PM, allen_282 wrote:

Tim,
These are mostly cars passing through, between the WP & GN at
Bieber.
There is one with out train info. You sort of have to know your
GN & WP steam engine numbers to help make sense of it.

The station book is organized by the last 3 digits of the car number.
The station agent(s) seem to be rather loose with there
abbreviations, like rg for rio grande, at for atsf, rd for reading,
mi for Milw (with out looking at an ORER)

So taking a line for example,

ic 32200 r 2126 10/4 f 907 907 10/4

ic car # 32200 received from train 2126(gn) 10/4/47 forwarded to
train 907(wp) 10/4/47

Some entries have multiple train/dates meaning the car past through
several times in three months. I repeat the whole entry for each
new train + date
I imported the data into excel, sorted by roadname and was blown away
by the number of Rg (reading) entries. Then I realized that it was
only 2 cars! Can you provide some interpretation of those movements
(especially their direction of travel)??
Received Forwarded
Rg 45200 r 252 1-Dec f 2127 1-Dec
Rg 45200 r 2017 13-Dec f 201 13-Dec

rg 43300 r 911 5-Dec f 2017 5-Dec
rg 43300 r 2126 19-Dec f 202 20-Dec
rg 43300 r 904 30-Dec f 2126 30-Dec

a couple of ATSF cars account for multiple moves as well

at 9200 r 210 11-Oct f 2019 11-Oct
at 9200 r 254 10-Nov f 2008 10-Nov
at 9200 r 2107 20-Nov f 206 20-Nov

at 5300 r 2115 14-Oct f 209 14-Oct
at 5300 r 905 24-Nov f 2127 24-Nov
at 5300 r 2007 5-Dec f 206 6-Dec

I'd be curious to see how these cars comply with the car service rules.

It looks like a nice national mix of cars <VBG>

BTW, if Rg is Reading, what is Rd?

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0







------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: Bieber cars was New file uploaded to STMFC

gary laakso
 

I read the Rg as Rio Grande.

gary laakso
south of Mike Brock
vasa0vasa@earthlink.net

----- Original Message -----
From: Bruce Smith
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: 11/11/2009 10:07:47 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Bieber cars was New file uploaded to STMFC




On Nov 10, 2009, at 11:07 PM, allen_282 wrote:

Tim,
These are mostly cars passing through, between the WP & GN at
Bieber.
There is one with out train info. You sort of have to know your
GN & WP steam engine numbers to help make sense of it.

The station book is organized by the last 3 digits of the car number.
The station agent(s) seem to be rather loose with there
abbreviations, like rg for rio grande, at for atsf, rd for reading,
mi for Milw (with out looking at an ORER)

So taking a line for example,

ic 32200 r 2126 10/4 f 907 907 10/4

ic car # 32200 received from train 2126(gn) 10/4/47 forwarded to
train 907(wp) 10/4/47

Some entries have multiple train/dates meaning the car past through
several times in three months. I repeat the whole entry for each
new train + date
I imported the data into excel, sorted by roadname and was blown away
by the number of Rg (reading) entries. Then I realized that it was
only 2 cars! Can you provide some interpretation of those movements
(especially their direction of travel)??
Received Forwarded
Rg 45200 r 252 1-Dec f 2127 1-Dec
Rg 45200 r 2017 13-Dec f 201 13-Dec

rg 43300 r 911 5-Dec f 2017 5-Dec
rg 43300 r 2126 19-Dec f 202 20-Dec
rg 43300 r 904 30-Dec f 2126 30-Dec

a couple of ATSF cars account for multiple moves as well

at 9200 r 210 11-Oct f 2019 11-Oct
at 9200 r 254 10-Nov f 2008 10-Nov
at 9200 r 2107 20-Nov f 206 20-Nov

at 5300 r 2115 14-Oct f 209 14-Oct
at 5300 r 905 24-Nov f 2127 24-Nov
at 5300 r 2007 5-Dec f 206 6-Dec

I'd be curious to see how these cars comply with the car service rules.

It looks like a nice national mix of cars <VBG>

BTW, if Rg is Reading, what is Rd?

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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