Date   

Re: NH 1937 AAR boxcars

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

Let me correct/revise the post I just made. The roster information from Ed
Hawkins has a built date of July 1941, The photo of 36003 has a built date
of August 1941. I am not sure which is correct. Cars have been repainted
with incorrect dates before.

36003 has a triangle to the right of the road number.

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Re: NH 1937 AAR boxcars

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

Walter Clark wrote:
What year were these built, square or W corner posts, and are the Red
Caboose kits correct? Also, what decals would you recommend? I could add
one to my >growing pile of un-built kits.

Walter:
NH 30000-30999 were built in July 1941. They had W corner posts, wood
roofwalks, a variety of handbrakes, and black doors when built. As for
decals, use Ted C's excellent NH decals. I am using the Red caboose kit for
my model.

They had two other series built in 1944 but that is beyond your date of
interest.

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Re: IRC 1958 cuft hoppers

Walter M. Clark
 

--- In STMFC@..., Bill Schneider <branchline@...> wrote:

Tim, good point although your numbers are off. Through careful
market research we have determined that the actual number of modelers
left is 1,235.
 
The number who still build kits is currently 52. Unless of course
you've stopped too.... ;>)
 
Bill Schneider (who's up WAY too late dealing with China!)

--- On Thu, 10/16/08, timboconnor@... <timboconnor@...> wrote:

From: timboconnor@... <timboconnor@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: IRC 1958 cuft hoppers
To: STMFC@...
Date: Thursday, October 16, 2008, 4:28 PM

Bill, I hope you counted me in those 52. I currently have 8 resin
kits in various stages of gathering dust, er, I mean various stages of
construction.

Time stopped in November 1941
Walter M. Clark
Pullman, Washington, USA





Yeah, probably all 700 or 800 actual modelers left on the planet will
be very excited... :-)

Tim O'Connor

------------ -- Original message ------------ --------- -
From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@signaturep ress.com>

I think most modelers will be blown away by these new cars.















Re: NH 1937 AAR boxcars

Walter M. Clark
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Peter Ness" <prness@...> wrote:

Brian,
Funny you mention the 10'IH postwar cars....just completed those with
the Archer rivets (see the Archer rivets photo folder on STMFC) <G>.

Interestingly, photo evidence suggests these cars remained in script
herald until ca. 1966 when they were re-painted in the 'Alpert'
or 'Trustee' scheme. The same seems to hold true for the 31000-series
1937 AAR box cars. In effect, you can model many of the New Haven Box
Cars (except the 30000-series) in script herald up to 1960 (or beyond,
but that's past the scope of STMFC) and have a time-appropriate repaint
stencil.

Does your broadside of 36003 show the triangle stencil applied to the
right of the road number?

Regards,
Peter
--- In STMFC@..., "Brian J Carlson" <brian@> wrote:

Thanks Peter, I have a Richard Burg broadside of 36003 c. 1959. At
first
glance, I thought the discoloration on the sill to the left of the
door was
just weathering. Upon close inspection, I see that is indeed a trust
plate.
I should have expected that location since it is the same as the PS-
1's and
postwar 10' IH cars.

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY
Peter, I'm interested in your comment about the 1937 AAR cars. I
model the far West, but we know from previous threads that box cars
traveled far and wide. What year were these built, square or W corner
posts, and are the Red Caboose kits correct? Also, what decals would
you recommend? I could add one to my growing pile of un-built kits.

Time stopped in November 1941
Walter M. Clark
Pullman, Washington, USA


Re: resin versus injection molded

Walter M. Clark
 

--- In STMFC@..., "mcindoefalls" <mcindoefalls@...> wrote:
<snip>
I seem to have the problem which I mentioned . . . often in resin kits
the parts don't match, not even one side to the other, let alone the
roof and/or floor.

That's one reason I prefer a good styrene kit. I have yet to try a
one-piece body resin kit, but I look forward to doing so.

Walt Lankenau
Walt, I have a bunch (PLEASE don't ask for an exact number <g>) of
one-piece body resin kits, and only the few I have from Speedwitch and
the B & O USRA mill gondolas from Westerfield have the parts of the
one-piece body fitted together well. All the others have one or more
seams (side/end or side/roof) where it looks like the master didn't
get put together very tightly, leaving space for dribbles, globs and
blobs of resin to fill the gap. Not a large space, but even the first
flat resin kit (close to 20 years ago) I assembled (without
RightClamps) has tighter seams. It's not just multiple iterations of
one kit, but almost every kit that I have. Since I'm filling the
groves in the siding of the single sheathed box cars I can fill those
areas too, but I thought the one-piece body was supposed to make the
construction easier, not more difficult. Of course, if I just go
ahead and build the cars, slap on a coat of paint, decal and weather
the living daylights out of them, then squint enough, they look fine.

Time stopped in November 1941
Walter M. Clark
Pullman, Washington, USA


Re: Future of Model Railroading

Adam & Laura Eyring <eyrings06@...>
 

I know this is getting off-topic, but I wanted to quickly say that a local tourist line, Wannamaker, Kempton, and Southern (http://www.kemptontrain.com/) has a decent car-length continuous running layout (Pennsy, Reading, etc.) in a passenger car kept parked by the station.

AME

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene Green" <bierglaeser@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Saturday, October 18, 2008 8:17 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re:Future of Model Railroading


I just spent the day sitting in the cab of a steam locomotive
explaining to visitors what the various knobs and levers do. (As if I
knew.) Almost everyone who came brought children. It just occurred to
me that if we had a small model railroad on display nearby - perhaps in
our caboose - the visitors could make the mental leap from "trains" to
model railroading. I guess it is an idea for next year.

Gene Green


Re: Future of Model Railroading

Richard Hendrickson
 

Guys, I'm getting tired of reading all this unfocussed blather about the future of the hobby. At my age I'm increasingly inclined to quote Rhett Butler in Gone With the Wind: "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn." In any case, the discussion wanders further and further away from the subject of freight cars. Mike, are you there? isn't it about time to call a halt to this?

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Future of Model Railroading

Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

I just spent the day sitting in the cab of a steam locomotive
explaining to visitors what the various knobs and levers do. (As if I
knew.) Almost everyone who came brought children. It just occurred to
me that if we had a small model railroad on display nearby - perhaps in
our caboose - the visitors could make the mental leap from "trains" to
model railroading. I guess it is an idea for next year.

Gene Green


Re: Future of Model Railroading

Robert <riverob@...>
 

Mal,
In contrast to the positive things you said about steam (& early
diesel) era railroading, today's trains are seen by many modern kids
as a blank slate, literally. A place to express either their
"authentic" independence, anti-corporate rage, or "youth group"
loyalaty through the liberal application of pen and paint. On the
other hand, rail crews find it annoying that some people think that
trains make great targets, be it for rocks, firearms, or the
occassional sofa pushed off an overpass.

At least that's what I see around my compound here in suburban
Southen California.

Rob Simpson



--- In STMFC@..., Indian640@... wrote:

There may be a future for our hobby but what will it be?

First come the (full sized) trains.............then the
fascination, and maybe after that the modeling.

The trouble is that there are fewer and fewer branch lines which
once served every town, with sidings for multiple
consignees...........small retail lumber yards (now served by trucks
if they haven't been put out of business by the "Big Box" stores),
coal yards (all gone, of course and displaced by oil dealers, once
served by rail and now by trucks)..........and even the grocery
stores and hardware stores received goods by rail.

Mal Houck


Re: Cabot Carbon Black Cars

David North <davenorth@...>
 

Hi Jon,

RailShops do two Cabot schemes - an early scheme in CB-102 and a later
scheme in kit CB-101

If you want the early billboard scheme, F&C offer the early Cabot Certified
Spheron Decals in their kit #6312

You could ask if they sell the decals separately.

Cheers

Dave


Re: Foobie, was IRC 1958 cuft hoppers

naptownprr
 

Thanks, Bruce. I'm always happy to learn new vocabulary words.

Quoting Bruce Smith <@smithbf>:


On Oct 17, 2008, at 10:27 AM, @timboconnor wrote:

From the Random Hose Model RR Dictionary:
Foobie (Foo-bee), noun: A model kit or ready to run that purports to
represent an actual prototype railroad car but in fact is incorrect
either
in the manner of decoration or the physical details of the car
itself, or
most often, both. Not to be confused with merely mediocre models.
Foobie - a compound word originally derived from "fake" and "boob"
and used to describe silicon implanted mammary glands. Now
generically used for anything that is bogus. It may also be related
to the military term FUBAR, which certainly applies to these Athearn,
ex-MDC rib side triples.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0



Re: Mineral Service on your Roads

Allen Cain <allencain@...>
 

Forgot to mention that if you are modeling an ALUMINUM smelter prior
to the 1960's you better have GREAT ventilation in your train room as
those old Soderberg smelting pots gave off some VERY nasty foul
smelling fumes! Allen Cain


Re: Mineral Service on your Roads

Allen Cain <allencain@...>
 

Aluminum; source area usually overseas (Guinea, Jamaica, Brazil,
India); would have entered U.S. ports, most eastern.

ALUMINUMs is the solid metal product of smelting ALUMINA (Aluminum
Oxide, Al2O3). ALUMINA is extracted from BAUXITE which is strip mined
in the counties noted above plus Australia.

BAUXITE is typically transported in ships to refineries which are
typically near if not on the coast or inland waterway where the ships
could be unloaded direct to the refinery storage. BAUXITE is bulky
and heavy to transport.

Once the ALUMINA is refined it is then transported by rail in covered
hoppers to inland smelters. In its hay days, I believe that ALCOA
(Aluminum Company of America) shipped in unit trains of 100 cars.
ALUMINA must be kept extremely dry. Airslide equipped cars were used
in later years (I unloaded these during brief periods of forces labor
at Alcoa, TN in the 1970's and 1980's).

ALUMINA is also used as an abrasive in the manufacturing of sand paper
and grinding wheels or as is as a blast cleaning media. It is also
used in the manufacture of refractory brick used in furnaces. There
are probably many more but these come to mind.

ALUMINUM ingots or billets are cast at the smelting plants and were
transported by both bulk head flat cars and by truck in later years
and in box cars in earlier periods.

The ALUMINUM ingot sizes increased over the years to where
transportation in a box car was not practical. In the 1970's Alcoa
cast ingots in the 10,000 to 20,000 lb range while in the 1980's and
later ingots increased in size to 30,000 lbs. Typical dimensions
would have been in the range of 16 to 24" thick by 20 to 30 ft long
and 3 to 6 ft wide (all dimensions increased over time and I am doing
this from memory).

As was the case in Alcoa, TN, the ALUMINUM ingots might be transported
to a rolling mill to be converted to coils of flat rolled sheet or
foil. End users are numerous but can companies, building products,
packaging and signs come to mind.

ALUMINUM was also cast into round billets or logs in a variety of
diameters and lengths. Diameters of 5" to 12" and lengths of 10 ft to
30 ft would be typical. These would be used by extrusion companies
which would heat the metal and then press it through a die to make a
shape (think of the Play Dough press just MUCH bigger).

In addition to ALUMINUM ingots and billets there was
"T-Bar" which was sold to end users for remelting. These had the
cross section of a VERY short T and could be handled by a fork truck.

At a larger smelter such as the one in Alcoa, TN, the company had its
own railroad to switch the cars between the three plants and inside of
the plant. At Alcoa, TN, it was the Alcoa Terminal Railroad.

Allen


Re: Cabot Carbon Black Cars

David North <davenorth@...>
 

Thanks for your trouble anyway Ed.

Cheers

Dave


Re: Walthers Michigan ore car (NEW)

Tim O'Connor
 

Think they'll come with wire grabs? If they're anything
like the Walthers 2893 PS-2, i wouldn't feel too excited.
Wasn't this prototype in the old MDC lineup, which means
Athearn still has the tooling?

Tim O'Connor

This caught me by surprise (yea!):
http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/932-40501
But at twice the price of the DMIR versions. Yikes.
Curt Fortenberry


Re: Walthers Michigan ore car (NEW)

gn3397 <heninger@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Curt Fortenberry" <arrphoto@...> wrote:

This caught me by surprise (yea!):

http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/932-40501

But at twice the price of the DMIR versions. Yikes.

Curt Fortenberry
The Walthers description says the cars were built to transport the "heavier iron ores of
Michigan's Upper Peninsula." I always thought the (slight) dimensional differences between
the Minnesota and Michigan style ore cars was the fact that the holding pockets on the iron
ore docks were spaced differently. Is Michigan ore denser, or is there another explanation?
Thanks for any help.

Sincerely,
Robert D. Heninger
Iowa City, Iowa


Re: Future of Model Railroading

Malcolm H. Houck
 

There may be a future for our hobby but what will it be?

First come the (full sized) trains.............then the fascination, and
maybe after that the modeling.

The trouble is that there are fewer and fewer branch lines which once served
every town, with sidings for multiple consignees...........small retail
lumber yards (now served by trucks if they haven't been put out of business by
the "Big Box" stores), coal yards (all gone, of course and displaced by oil
dealers, once served by rail and now by trucks)..........and even the grocery
stores and hardware stores received goods by rail.

That was the "retail" business of the rail lines, which drove them to near
disaster. Now the rails are in the "wholesale" (transportation)
business...........containers, containers containers..........and bulk commodities, with
fewer and fewer "retail" runs. Oh, sure.........the shortlines have absorbed
the branch line shed by the trunk carriers, but the point is that the daily
switch runs, locals, way freights and "pick-ups" are largely gone and with them
the daily contact with the trains that once was. It's harder to introduce the
interest when the subject matter is harder to find.

We.............the collective "we" don't travel by trains nearly as much as
once before and that too represents a lesser contact. A youthful recollection
of travel from New England to the Midwest in a roomette car is still vivid,
and after decades have passed.

Yet, they (trains) are still working, moving machines which as its own
attraction. While steam engines (once characterized as the "most human of all
machines........") are gone from the everyday, they can still be seen in more and
more typical settings on operating museums. It surely takes but a single
ride or visit to perhaps create another railfan...........and then maybe a
modeler who can, by miniature bring home and revisit that stunning memory.
Diesels, to some, have similar attraction...........and if they can attract a newer
modeler, then all the better.

New offerings from manufactures have preserved and enhanced the hobby, in my
opinion. The simple reason is that all of this "new" stuff works.........it
runs and it really does work. While this list is populated by builders (and
kit builders and the "resinators"), the overall age of the list population is
such that all of us can remember building (trying to build) early kits, many
of which were dreadful even for a modeler with some acquired skill and
workshop capability.

Nothing, I think can discourage and drive from any hobby or pursuit poor
results.........or poor products. I grew up with only the pot metal steam engine
kits and, aside from minimal painting skills (no airbrush) it was struggle to
get the final product to run (all other variables of things like fiber tie
strip track and switches that were troublesome at best aside). Frequent
magazine articles continually addressed the problems of side rod bind and gear
noise..........all with uncertain results and often representing insoluble
problems.

I have no such troubles since I'm primarily an engine builder, but for those
who aren't the offerings of Broadway and MTH run right out of the box.
This's to the greater benefit of the hobby so far as newer enthusiasts don't run
aground on the shoal or poorly running equipment. That may seem to "we"
modelers and builders as instant gratification...........but it's unfortunately(?)
the way things are.

So, at long wind, on the [steam era freight car -- to keep to topic]"kits"
which are another manifestation of the need for instant
gratification..........but the "ready to roll" cars DO work...........and the historic "coupler
conspiracy" troubles of matching dummy, Baker, Mantua, Roundhouse or X-2f
couplers is past with the industry "standardization with Kadee compatibles.

I still build kits and bash them too, but in the sense of preserving some
future....and introducing newer modelers to the hobby the ready to run --
ready to roll products DO serve a purpose. If those are what keep the
manufacturers in the business then "we" shouldn't complain. It seems that with resin
kits [continually improving]and some higher quality injection molded kits there
will always be some kits.....though kits may not be the norm or the larger
part of products to select from.

Enough...................

Mal Houck
**************New MapQuest Local shows what's happening at your destination.
Dining, Movies, Events, News & more. Try it out
(http://local.mapquest.com/?ncid=emlcntnew00000002)


Re: Modeling Iron Ore Pellets

Curt Fortenberry <arrphoto@...>
 

Which message was that, I can't find it???

Curt Fortenberry

I'd like to expand on Elden's excellent description of iron ore
pelleting from many years of visiting the Lake Superior & Ishpeming
RR.


Walthers Michigan ore car (NEW)

Curt Fortenberry <arrphoto@...>
 

This caught me by surprise (yea!):

http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/932-40501

But at twice the price of the DMIR versions. Yikes.

Curt Fortenberry


Re: IRC 1958 cuft hoppers

Adam & Laura Eyring <eyrings06@...>
 

Try a children's hospital or Cub Scout group. Some children recovering from illnesses would probably love to build something with their hands. There is a model railroading badge for the scouts.

AME

----- Original Message -----
From: "mcindoefalls" <mcindoefalls@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Friday, October 17, 2008 1:14 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: IRC 1958 cuft hoppers


--- In STMFC@..., asychis@... wrote:

Tim,

How about giving all those kits to a local orphanage, school, cub
scout
pack, etc. and spread the model railroad virus to some of them?
Great idea, Jerry. I sent a few boxes of old stuff to a G.I. in Iraq
last year, and if I knew of a charitable place to send my old Athearn
blue box and other outdated freight car (and other) kits, I'd do it in
a heartbeat. Otherwise, it's only a short walk to the dumpster . . .

Walt Lankenau


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