Date   

Re: Stainless wire for STMFC safety appliances...

Tim O'Connor
 

Xuron makes several hard wire cutters e.g. 410HS/691/2193/2193F.
I have used them effectively w/ stainless steel wire and piano wire
without damage to the cutters. But I'm only cutting stuff smaller
than .020.

Tim O'Connor

At 5/7/2009 07:09 PM Thursday, you wrote:
Xuron does make a hard wire cutter, though I've not tried it on
stainless:

http://www.micromark.com/XURON-HARD-WIRE-CUTTER,7624.html

-Clark Cooper


Common frt car trucks 1950s?

Brian Chapman <cornbeltroute@...>
 

Wonder if someone might know what the most common freight car trucks were in use during the 1950s (and into the '60s) - type, wheelbase, manufacturers?

Thanks much,

Brian

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa

---


Re: Santa Fe ice reefer on the move....

proto48er
 

Guys -

Are any of these prototype ATSF reefers still in existence that still have the ORIGINAL fishbelly CENTERSILL under them? I have seen more that 40 of them between Lubbock and Amarillo, and a few dozen more in New Mexico, but all had their centersills cut off (so they would sit flat on the ground). Surely one of these still exists with trucks under it?! Where?

Thanks!

A.T. Kott

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Lucas" <stevelucas3@...> wrote:

But in a different way...

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=172381&nseq=3836

Steve Lucas.


Re: Stainless wire for STMFC safety appliances...

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

Thanks to everyone for the good suggestions and advice. I have some CMA phosphor bronze wire, but have yet to use it for grabirons and brake rigging. Seems to me that some commercial grabs already use phosphor bronze wire, but are oversize in diameter.

STMFC construction has been held up for a bit by work on my layout. But, I recently built a Westerfield CN 48' gon and used .007" brass wire for grabirons. A bent grabiron on a gon is not a big issue, as anyone familiar with the abuse that these cars receive can understand.

I want to build my STMFC's with scale-sized diameter grabs and other wirework, and thus I'm looking for material that is to scale and will stand up to handling--which is why I'm considering using stainless wire for the smaller diameter stuff. I kitbashed a tank car using D/A .019" brass wire for the tank railing, and I have no issues with its strength. But the smaller stuff just bends way too easily.

One would think that .008 stainless wire would be as easy to cut as say, .015" brass wire, right? Smaller wire, less resistance to shearing force when cutting it, etc.?

Steve Lucas.


Re: Santa Fe ice reefer on the move....

Bruce Smith
 

On May 8, 2009, at 11:44 AM, Steve Lucas wrote:

But in a different way...

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=172381&nseq=3836

Steve Lucas.
Calling Mont!

What a great photo. I would have to guess that the reefer is destined for use as a shed somewhere. How would the reefer have been attached to the tractor? The rear wheels of the tractor appear to be ahead of the end of the reefer. The bogies under the reefer look to be attached near the bolster. How were they attached?

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Santa Fe ice reefer on the move....

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 


Re: B&O wagontop box is next

Thomas Baker
 

Jim,

As you have heard before, I will be looking forward to the M-53 box car, finally a model of the car in affordable plastic. You will not hear from me immediately in June because I will be taking 15 high-school students through Germany, Austria, quickly through France, and through Spain and will only be back in the States on June29. By that time, the box car should be on the market.

Then there will be that SAL turtleback car, right?

And then the Milwaukee rib side, right? I hope anyway.

Tom


B&O wagontop box is next

Jim King
 

I'm starting the HO and S scale patterns for the B&O "wagontop" M53 boxcar
late next week. The HO version will be offered thru Wright Trak Models with
a target release date of late June. The S version will follow shortly
behind. Contact Gary Wright directly for info on the HO version.



The S scale version will retail for $80 and includes our standard 1-pc body
with separate underframe (of the Duryea flavor) and Kadee 802s. Due to
availability problems, I am no longer offering trucks but am contemplating
producing my own ASF/Bettendorf style trucks if there is demand (make your
voices heard!).



Jim King

Smoky Mountain Model Works, Inc.

<http://www.smokymountainmodelworks.com>


Re: Stainless wire for STMFC safety appliances...

sparachuk <sparachuk@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "brionboyles" <BrionBoyles@...> wrote:

Love the stuff. Tough, durable, scale...I got mine....several sizes... years ago from a dentist. He used it for making braces (boy, I would have hated to be on the receiving end of THAT...). Will take paint if clean. ...and it WILL RUIN A PAIR OF CUTTERS. NEVER use a Zuron on it. Even the small stuff.

I particularly like it for E/F unit cab grabs, steam handrails and PRR antennea. I also use the really fine stuff for bell/whistle cords. You can bend it by pulling thru your fingers, drill a hole in the cab front, attach the bell/whistle end and let the other end ride free thru the cab hole. With the proper gentle bend, it will "hang" nicely and not fuzz up like thread. In that regard, I also sometimes the stuff to rig water tanks and such...looks taut and never sags.

Brion
Guys, what you're talking about sounds more or less like guitar string, although perhaps that was what was meant by the term music wire. Often called nickel steel by the makers it's available in individual 3 foot or so lengths in sizes that start at .008" and go up to .019" or a bit more. It cuts with regular hard steel side or end cutters that you get at the hardware store. Find a music store and ask some one there.
Stephan Parachuk
Toronto


Re: Stainless wire for STMFC safety appliances...

Steve SANDIFER
 

Commercial wire cutters or Dremel cut-off disk

--- On Thu, 5/7/09, cobrapsl@aol.com <cobrapsl@aol.com> wrote:

From: cobrapsl@aol.com <cobrapsl@aol.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Stainless wire for STMFC safety appliances...
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, May 7, 2009, 4:55 PM








Brion Boyles said...

...and it WILL RUIN A PAIR OF CUTTERS. NEVER use a Zuron on it. Even the small stuff.

THEN WHAT DOES ONE DO TO CUT IT?

Paul Lyons
Laguna Niguel, CA

-----

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Stainless wire for STMFC safety appliances...

Clark Cooper
 

Xuron does make a hard wire cutter, though I've not tried it on stainless:

http://www.micromark.com/XURON-HARD-WIRE-CUTTER,7624.html

-Clark Cooper

On May 7, 2009, at 4:55 PM, cobrapsl@aol.com wrote:



Brion Boyles said...

...and it WILL RUIN A PAIR OF CUTTERS. NEVER use a Zuron on it. Even the small stuff.

THEN WHAT DOES ONE DO TO CUT IT?

Paul Lyons
Laguna Niguel, CA


Re: Stainless wire for STMFC safety appliances...

Paul Lyons
 

Brion Boyles said...

...and it WILL RUIN A PAIR OF CUTTERS. NEVER use a Zuron on it. Even the small stuff.


THEN WHAT DOES ONE DO TO CUT IT?

Paul Lyons
Laguna Niguel, CA

-----


Re: Stainless wire for STMFC safety appliances...

brionboyles
 

Love the stuff. Tough, durable, scale...I got mine....several sizes... years ago from a dentist. He used it for making braces (boy, I would have hated to be on the receiving end of THAT...). Will take paint if clean. ...and it WILL RUIN A PAIR OF CUTTERS. NEVER use a Zuron on it. Even the small stuff.

I particularly like it for E/F unit cab grabs, steam handrails and PRR antennea. I also use the really fine stuff for bell/whistle cords. You can bend it by pulling thru your fingers, drill a hole in the cab front, attach the bell/whistle end and let the other end ride free thru the cab hole. With the proper gentle bend, it will "hang" nicely and not fuzz up like thread. In that regard, I also sometimes the stuff to rig water tanks and such...looks taut and never sags.

Brion


Re: Mystery boxcar

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

Garth--

I kept getting a 404 message when trying to access your scans. But if the car was built in December, 1942, then the car can be neither a CN nor GTW steel boxcar rebuild.

GTW's Port Huron, Michigan shops rebuilt steel-frame ex-GTW boxcars in 1935 to GTW series 460000-460599 steel boxcars. New steel sides and Youngstown doors were applied to the cars.

Port Huron shops also rebuilt 250 cars for CN in 1936. Steel-frame 40' cars from the 578000 and 578900 series were the feedstock for CN 470000-470999 with Hutchins Dry Lading roofs, and 470100-470249 with raised panel roofs. These cars kept their 7/8 "Murphy" ends, but were modified with a 4" flat steel splice panel between upper and lower portions of the ends. The ends also had steel angles grafted onto their sides to allow for the increased width of the car when steel-sheathed.

Sylvan Scale Models had offered HO kits for both the CN and GTW cars, but they seem to be out of production. By the way, it just so happens that I took some photos of one of the CN 470100 series last Sunday--I'll post them shortly.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Garth Groff <ggg9y@...> wrote:

Friends,

I have posted three scans of the mystery boxcar I asked about on Friday
to my web site. I note that the car was built 5-42, not 1946 as I
remembered.

Andy Carlson and I had an off-group discussion about this car, and he
suggested it might have been a munitions car. That is possible,
especially later in its life if it was indeed a military car, but I
don't see how the man doors fit in to a purpose-built munitions car, nor
the roller bearing trucks. More likely, if it was a military car, it was
built as some sort of troop baggage car, though I wouldn't rule out
captive munitions use later in its life.

I don't know who built the car, but the 12-panel sides and straight side
sill suggest Pressed Steel Car Co.

Anyway, have at 'em:

http://www.people.virginia.edu/~ggg9y/mystery1.jpg

http://www.people.virginia.edu/~ggg9y/mystery2.jpg

http://www.people.virginia.edu/~ggg9y/mystery3.jpg

If anyone wants to save these scans, I recommend you transfer them to
your hard drive or print them out soon. Due to limited space on the
university server, I will only leave them up for a few days.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff





Re: Alternate Center Rivets

barrybennetttoo <Barrybennetttoo@...>
 

I placed an order with Archer last Sunday for exactly that purpose. When I
get around to doing it,of course.



Barry Bennett

-------Original Message-------



From: Anthony Thompson

Date: 06/05/2009 21:39:10

To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com

Subject: Re: [STMFC] Alternate Center Rivets









Aley, Jeff A wrote:

Have you been there and done this? If so, please share photos!!
I've thought of it, (probably lots of people have also thought
of it) but I haven't tried it.


No, not yet. But I'm so impressed with the tank car experience

I've had that I can see the ACR opportunity. I'd be surprised if I

were the first to think of it.



Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com

(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com

Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Stainless wire for STMFC safety appliances...

leakinmywaders
 

Steve: Stainless works great. I like brass if I am locating and drilling my own mounting holes and bound to get a few off the mark a bit, as it's easier to bend the grabs (in two or three dimensions) after mounting to compensate and straighten them. But if you have sure, straight holes and a jig to bend the wire consistently, stainless steel grabs go in easy and are rock solid durable.

Like someone else said, phosphor bronze is my favorite, as in my hands it feels like the perfect balance of stiffness, springiness, and malleability for HO freight car details. It's workable but unlike much softer brass, very resistant to deformation when models are handled.

Chris Frissell
Polson, MT

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Lucas" <stevelucas3@...> wrote:

Staring at me in the pile of car kits to build is a Rail Shops' carbon black covered hopper. .009" stainless steel wire is supplied in the kit for grabirons and brake rigging.

Has anyone here any comments on the use of this wire on STMFC models? It seems tougher than the usual brass wire that we use, and in .009" diameter, is very near scale size for HO grab irons and brake rigging.

Steve Lucas.


Re: Mystery boxcar

sparachuk <sparachuk@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On May 6, 2009, at 1:02 PM, gn3397 wrote:

Hello all,
On page 67 of the Great Northern Pictorial volume 6, there is a
picture of some GN F units bringing a train into Conrad, MT during
July 1950. As is frustratingly often the case to freight car buffs
such as ourselves, there is an interesting boxcar in the
background. This is a rebuilt car, as evidenced by brackets along
the side sill, with what appears to be a 6 foot door. The cause for
interest is the end, however. The end is a 7/8 Murphy with a middle
extension panel that appears to be a single corrugation from an
Inverse Dreadnaught end, mounted with the corrugation facing outward.

Probably GTW. I have photos of both USRA rebuilds and rebuilds of
early '20s cars with 7-8 corrugated ends where the GTW used a single
Dreadnaught panel to extend the height of the ends.

Richard Hendrickson

I have posted a photo of a GTW rebuilt box made from a Sylvan Models kit with CDS lettering a few years ago. It's waiting approval in a folder called 'king street cars'. The model uses extra Murphy corrugations for the extra height.

Stephan Parachuk
Toronto


Re: Mystery boxcar

Richard Hendrickson
 

On May 6, 2009, at 1:02 PM, gn3397 wrote:

Hello all,
On page 67 of the Great Northern Pictorial volume 6, there is a
picture of some GN F units bringing a train into Conrad, MT during
July 1950. As is frustratingly often the case to freight car buffs
such as ourselves, there is an interesting boxcar in the
background. This is a rebuilt car, as evidenced by brackets along
the side sill, with what appears to be a 6 foot door. The cause for
interest is the end, however. The end is a 7/8 Murphy with a middle
extension panel that appears to be a single corrugation from an
Inverse Dreadnaught end, mounted with the corrugation facing outward.

The reporting marks are not legible, and there is no slogan or
herald on the car. Based on the pattern of the lettering, my
thoughts are that this is a L&N or GTW car. Did either railroad
have rebuilt boxcars with ends matching this description?














Probably GTW. I have photos of both USRA rebuilds and rebuilds of
early '20s cars with 7-8 corrugated ends where the GTW used a single
Dreadnaught panel to extend the height of the ends.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Mystery boxcar

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "gn3397" <heninger@...> wrote:

The reporting marks are not legible, and there is no slogan or herald on the car. Based on the pattern of the lettering, my thoughts are that this is a L&N or GTW car. Did either railroad have rebuilt boxcars with ends matching this description?

Sincerely,
Robert D. Heninger
Iowa City, IA
I know the GTW had steel rebuilds of USRA boxcars, because I took some photos of one in work service a number of years ago, but I have no idea what the service number or lettering scheme would have been.

Dennis


Re: Stainless wire for STMFC safety appliances...

Tim O'Connor
 

BLMA sells packages of .008 stainless steel grabs

At 5/6/2009 09:26 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
Steve,

As is often the case, you got lots of opinions, but no answer to your question.

Unfortunately, I can't help either. I've never tried stainless wire for
grabs. You probably will have to experiment.

I'd see how paint sticks to it first. Bright silver grabs won't cut it.
If paint adheres well, then try forming it to the shape you need and paint it.
If the paint's still on after you apply them to a car, post your
conclusions so we all can learn.

In fact even if they're a flop, a post would help us all.

Good luck,

Ray

103701 - 103720 of 185091