Date   

Re: Paint Color Suggestion for Wabash Single Door Boxcar, circa 1942

James F. Brewer <jfbrewer@...>
 

Jason,

I have just built a Sunshine Mini-Kit that utilizes the Tichy Steel USRA Rebuild for a model of a Wabash rebuilt boxcar; the info with the mini-kit indicates the Wabash color was very near the Pennsy freight car color (just reporting what is written and not wanting to start a war on PRR color); also, in the September 2008 RMC, installment 43 of Essential Freight Cars (Post-War AAR boxcars), Ted Culotta features a Wabash car and suggests Badger Modelflex Light Tuscan Oxide Red for a very good approximation of the Wabash oxide red freight color. I used this paint for my Sunshine mini-kit.

In Volume 3, RPC, Pat Wider provided a table of suggested model paint for various prototypes; his suggestion for Wabash is equal parts of Floquil's Southern Brown (#175) and Oxide Red (#186). Since Volume 3 was published in 1999, I believe Floquil has changed its formulas.

Your paint guy might want to look at the Badger color and see what Scalecoat may have that is close. Hope this helps.

Jim Brewer
Glenwood MD

----- Original Message -----
From: parkcitybranch
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, December 04, 2008 11:37 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Paint Color Suggestion for Wabash Single Door Boxcar, circa 1942


I have an Overland Models Wabash Single Door box car that was
converted from a double door auto box car. Can anyone suggest a paint
color for circa 1942. A scalecoat paint match would be best since
that is what my painter likes to use. Thanks.

Jason Sanford


Re: Pipe Thread is terminated

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

CJ Riley says:

"Would the ban include the shipment of smoking tobacco pipes in steam era freight cars?"

Bill Kelly says:

"Since there is a problem with discussing the thread on pipes does this
mean that we are free to discuss plain end pipe riding in steam era
freight cars ?"

Very good. I particularly like Bill's reference to "thread".

OTOH,

Pipe down...guys <G>.

Mike Brock


ADMIN: Re: Re: Pipe Thread is terminated

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Tony Thompson writes:

"I thought we were free to discuss loads in STEAM ERA FRT CARS,
which is what most of the pipe discussion has been. Not so?"

It depends. Uncontrolled discussions of loads can quickly take us into a VERY expanded acceptable scope of permitted subjects. While there were within scope messages regarding pipes...how to model pipes and how to load them in what types of cars...there were also messages only remotely associated with frt cars. Note my:

"Therefore...as of midnight tonight...ET...the thread on pipes [ of any
kind ] is terminated with the exception of a VERY clear association
with STEAM ERA FRT CARS."
So...if someone wants to discuss how pipes were loaded in steam era frt cars, that is fine and is obviously a close association with steam era frt cars. Discussions about how to model pipes is obviously also within scope. OTOH, discussions about how pipe is made, how heavy it was, what companies made which pipe and how much profit they made in 1947, is not clearly associated with steam era frt cars. The point is, where does one stop? For example, grain was hauled in box cars during the steam era. That does not mean the STMFC is a great place to discuss the harvesting techniques of processing corn or soybeans or what fertilizer should be used to grow it. Certainly the transportation of lumber...finished and unfinished...and the loading concepts of it are important to the frt car modeler. The processes involved in growing trees or logging trees, however, are not closely associated with steam era Standard Gauge frt cars. IOW, just about every subject that is appropriate for discussion on the STMFC has a connection to associated discussions that are not appropriate unless we want to expand the subjects within scope to include everything in North America. I don't want to go there and if we open the door to discussions about stuff only VERY remotely connected with frt cars, we have to do it with all stuff. Thus, while some members might find discussions about pipe generation interesting, they might NOT find discussions about growing bananas in Guatemala [ gasp ] or the intricacies of mining and separating coal into proper sizes and the various aspects of the culture of coal miners in Rimrock Tennessee or Brock's Hollow, West By God, Virginia.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: PRR Gon info request

water.kresse@...
 

Richard,

If you find time i would appreciate a copy of that article on PRR Quad-hop 100-ton gon.

Al

-------------- Original message --------------
From: cinderandeight@aol.com
Guys,
Railway Age ran an article on the G23, and H26 (quintuple hopper) in the
June 18, 1919 issue on pages 1461-1466 (RA was paged in six month block back
then). The article has full drawings and many photos of the cars and their
trucks. If you'd like I could send you a scan of the article directly.
Rich Burg
**************One site has it all. Your email accounts, your social networks,
and the things you love. Try the new AOL.com
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%26icid=aolcom40vanity%26ncid=emlcntaolcom00000001)


pipe

ed_mines
 

Mike, are you telling us to pipe down?


Paint Color Suggestion for Wabash Single Door Boxcar, circa 1942

parkcitybranch <parkcitybranch@...>
 

I have an Overland Models Wabash Single Door box car that was
converted from a double door auto box car. Can anyone suggest a paint
color for circa 1942. A scalecoat paint match would be best since
that is what my painter likes to use. Thanks.

Jason Sanford


Re: Heinz freight car fleet

mwbpequod
 

For those interested, the NMRA library does have a near complete set
of the "Pickles in Miniature" newsletters, but not all of them, and
will supply you with photocopies of what they do have for a nominal
fee. Send them an e-mail if interested.

Martin Brechbiel



Jerry - Yes. The editor was Bill Dippert, MMR. The last info I
have for him (many years old) is 2650 NW Robinia Lane, Portland, OR
97229, (503)646-9783. At one time he was selling complete sets of
back issues. - Al Westerfield
----- Original Message -----
From: asychis@...
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, December 03, 2008 7:33 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Heinz freight car fleet


Al and Virgil,

Thanks for the information. I'll pursue the articles and see if
the NMRA
has any information on the old SIG. Was it called Pickles in
Miniature?

Jerry Michels
**************Life should be easier. So should your homepage. Try
the NEW
AOL.com.
(http://www.aol.com/?optin=new-
dp&icid=aolcom40vanity&ncid=emlcntaolcom00000002)

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Re: Pipe Thread is terminated

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Mike Brock wrote:
Therefore...as of midnight tonight...ET...the thread on pipes [ of any kind ] is terminated with the exception of a VERY clear association with STEAM ERA FRT CARS.
I thought we were free to discuss loads in STEAM ERA FRT CARS, which is what most of the pipe discussion has been. Not so?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Pipe Thread is terminated

Bill Kelly
 

Since there is a problem with discussing the thread on pipes does this
mean that we are free to discuss plain end pipe riding in steam era
freight cars ?
Later,
Bill Kelly

snip <
Therefore... as of midnight tonight...ET. ..the thread on pipes [ of
any kind ] is terminated with the exception of a VERY clear association
with STEAM ERA FRT CARS.
____________________________________________________________
Take a break - you deserve it. Click here to find a great vacation.
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL2141/fc/PnY6rw2gGUnmqYGhBlbC8Fij1NeJQWPVcmkTdfjR1t9df7tN9eXcF/


Re: Pipe Thread is terminated

CJ Riley
 

Would the ban include the shipment of smoking tobacco pipes in steam era freight cars?

CJ Riley

--- On Wed, 12/3/08, Mike Brock <brockm@brevard.net> wrote:
From: Mike Brock <brockm@brevard.net>
Subject: [STMFC] Pipe Thread is terminated
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, December 3, 2008, 4:43 PM











The current pipe thread is rapidly closing in on the record for longest

thread on the STMFC. The record is currently held by the very important

subject of...bananas. ..and I would dearly hate to see it dethroned. Also,

given the fact that we have gone far afield from steam era frt cars and are

now discussing how various pipes are constructed. ..etc...in today's world, I

think it's reasonably certain that we have drained all we can from

these...pipes.



Therefore... as of midnight tonight...ET. ..the thread on pipes [ of any

kind ] is terminated with the exception of a VERY clear association with

STEAM ERA FRT CARS.



Thank you.



Mike Brock

STMFC Owner





























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Photo of cheap pipe load

Steve SANDIFER
 

The link is to a photo of a Santa Fe emergency war gondola (Tichy) with an el-cheapo pipe load of coffee stirrers from What-A-Burger. They measure out as 10" diameter pipe. They are also 50' long, which may be too long for prototype.

I laid a normal drinking straw on top of the load (not normal practice) and it measured 20" in diameter.

From prototype photos I have seen, both are of useable size for realistic loads.

The straps are chart tape. It is for show only and does not hold anything together.

You don't glue the straws together with any plastic glue that I have found. I use barge cement.

http://www.geocities.com/stevesandifer2000/Lay/PipeLoad.jpg

______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@sbcglobal.net
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417


Pipe Thread is terminated

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

The current pipe thread is rapidly closing in on the record for longest thread on the STMFC. The record is currently held by the very important subject of...bananas...and I would dearly hate to see it dethroned. Also, given the fact that we have gone far afield from steam era frt cars and are now discussing how various pipes are constructed...etc...in today's world, I think it's reasonably certain that we have drained all we can from these...pipes.

Therefore...as of midnight tonight...ET...the thread on pipes [ of any kind ] is terminated with the exception of a VERY clear association with STEAM ERA FRT CARS.

Thank you.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

In 1981 I worked at a plant that made thread protectors for oilfield products. They were steel. There were both internal and external types, with variations in shape and configuration, I'm guessing based on whether they were for API or NPT threads.

Another potential freight car load: We would receive (in PA ) loads of used protectors from the field (western and southwestern US) for refurbishment by pickling and chasing the threads. Even in '81 it made economic sense to do this for the large (16+ inch) sizes. In the Steam Era - when labor was cheap and material expensive, I would not be surprised to learn that all but the smallest sizes were recycled.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Earl Tuson

Both the drill pipe and casing are threaded, and require protective caps during shipment. Nowadays those are plastic (bright blue, red, and so forth,) but I don't know what was used during the steam era.


Re: Norfolk Southern box car

David Wiggs
 

I suppose you guys know there is a relatively new book out there about
the old NS. The ACL/SAL Historical Society has it on their site and is
around 50 bucks.

David in Orlando

-----Original Message-----

1a. Re: Norfolk Southern box car
Posted by: "RUTLANDRS@aol.com" RUTLANDRS@aol.com rutlandrs
Date: Sun Nov 30, 2008 7:04 am ((PST))

Brian,
I posted this for a neighboring NMRA Division. I was told that the
car
info was provided by the NS Historical Society. So the naswer is I
don't know
but will forward the question.


Re: Northern Pacific Lettering Changes

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Dec 3, 2008, at 6:59 AM, railsnw1 wrote:

Richard,

Thank you for the reply. In the NP Classic Steam Locomotive book
their are a couple photos taken in 1939 showing the older lettering
on some double sheathed boxcars and that's what got me thinking about
this. So I'm guessing that by the early 40's at the latest we may
have seen cars lettered this way.








I'd guess that at least a few cars survived World War II with the old
lettering style, given the fact that all but the most essential
maintenance was deferred during the war. There's ample evidencethat
even wood sheathed cars weren't repainted much more often than every
ten years during the 1940s.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Heinz freight car fleet

Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

Jerry - Yes. The editor was Bill Dippert, MMR. The last info I have for him (many years old) is 2650 NW Robinia Lane, Portland, OR 97229, (503)646-9783. At one time he was selling complete sets of back issues. - Al Westerfield

----- Original Message -----
From: asychis@aol.com
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, December 03, 2008 7:33 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Heinz freight car fleet


Al and Virgil,

Thanks for the information. I'll pursue the articles and see if the NMRA
has any information on the old SIG. Was it called Pickles in Miniature?

Jerry Michels
**************Life should be easier. So should your homepage. Try the NEW
AOL.com.
(http://www.aol.com/?optin=new-dp&;icid=aolcom40vanity&ncid=emlcntaolcom00000002)


Re: Pipe loads on the cheap - Drill Pipe

Tim O'Connor
 

What is the typical diameter of drill pipe?
--------------------------------------------------
3 1/2" to 6 1/4" depending on exact usage -- depth and needed "drill"
(torsional) strength. Within certain limitations, a load of drill pipe would not
appear to be much different from (different than) a load of steam locomotive
flue stock; -- fire tubes or Superheater jackets.
Mal Houck

Thanks Mal. In that case, the photo link to the gondola loaded
with pipes must not be drill pipe. If a gondola is 9' (108") wide
and you can see about 10-11 pipes from side to side, then those
pipes must be over 8" in diameter...

Tim O'Connor


Small world was: Re: construction pipes

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "rdietrichson" <Rdietrichson@...> wrote:

Orangeburg pipe was made from building paper laminated together with
a tar binder.
I was in the Summerville, Holly Hill SC area a few times in the past
months and crossed the Orangeburg River daily. I can see why thay made
the pipe from paper. There seemed to be more trees in that area and
Northern Minnesota and Wisconsin combined!
I did see freight cars still lettered for B&O, C&O, and Reading.
Clark Propst


Re: construction pipes

SUVCWORR@...
 

Isn't the vitrified clay pipe what was called, at least during
the steam and transition era, "Orangeburg" pipe here in the east?
I believe that name came from the fact that most of is seemed to be
manufactured in the area surrounding Orangeburg, South Carolina. As
I recall from sales and use of it in the 1950 - 1965 period the
length of a section was some ratio of its outside diameter.





This has been generically referred to as terra cotta pipe or slip joint pipe
in SW PA. Slip joint is what the plumbers call it because the sections just
slip together without any mortar, cement etc. More often than not they also
slipped apart resulting during the ensuing 30 -50 years in may house
laterals needing to be replaced.

Rich Orr
**************Make your life easier with all your friends, email, and
favorite sites in one place. Try it now.
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Re: construction pipes

Richard Hendrickson
 

Since this subject is front and center on the STMFC list right now,
what can you tell me about the pipe in the attached photo? I want to
use this image in my forthcoming book on flat cars and gondolas for
the Santa Fe Historical Society, and I'd like to correctly identify
the pipe in the caption.

Richard Hendrickson



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