Date   

Re: Intermountain new HO 70 ton spring plank truck

Tim O'Connor
 

Sorry about that I meant to send that to Andy directly.

Date: Tue, 02 Dec 2008 16:39:53 -0500
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Intermountain new HO 70 ton spring plank truck


Andy I'd like to get oh, three of the ACF hopper kits.

Do you still have any Red Caboose mech reefers?

Tim


At 12/2/2008 04:17 PM Tuesday, you wrote:


I received my HO Intermountain undec AC&F 2 bay covered hopper kits.

This is the debut car for the new IMRRCo 70 ton plain journal spring plank truck. I will be offering these trucks in early 2009 as wheelset-less pairs, price TBD.

The AC&F 2 bays have a list price of $20.00. Contact me off-list(PLEASE)if interested in obtaining a $16.00 kit.
<midcentury@sbcglobal.net>

Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Intermountain new HO 70 ton spring plank truck

Tim O'Connor
 

Andy I'd like to get oh, three of the ACF hopper kits.

Do you still have any Red Caboose mech reefers?

Tim

At 12/2/2008 04:17 PM Tuesday, you wrote:


I received my HO Intermountain undec AC&F 2 bay covered hopper kits.

This is the debut car for the new IMRRCo 70 ton plain journal spring plank truck. I will be offering these trucks in early 2009 as wheelset-less pairs, price TBD.

The AC&F 2 bays have a list price of $20.00. Contact me off-list(PLEASE)if interested in obtaining a $16.00 kit.
<midcentury@sbcglobal.net>

Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Intermountain new HO 70 ton spring plank truck

Andy Carlson
 

I received my HO Intermountain undec AC&F 2 bay covered hopper kits.

This is the debut car for the new IMRRCo 70 ton plain journal spring plank truck. I will be offering these trucks in early 2009 as wheelset-less pairs, price TBD.

The AC&F 2 bays have a list price of $20.00. Contact me off-list(PLEASE)if interested in obtaining a $16.00 kit.
<midcentury@sbcglobal.net>

Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


paint match for dark olive green

Mark Pierce <marcoperforar@...>
 

Can anyone recommend a commercial product that will closely match the
dark olive green paint ala SP such as used on express boxcars, and in
particular, the Red Caboose models? Thanks.

Mark Pierce


Re: Heinz freight car fleet

Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

Many years ago there was a Heinz pickel SIG with a quarterly newsletter. It ran out of steam because we covered the Heinz fleet as completely as possible. - Al Westerfield

----- Original Message -----
From: asychis@aol.com
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, December 02, 2008 10:58 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Heinz freight car fleet


Hi,

At one time or another I believe there were some good articles on the Heinz
fleet in either Rail Model Journal, Mainline, or Mainline Modeler. I cannot
remember which,and I wonder if someone on the list might point me in the
right direction. I searched previous messages, and found little. Also, is there
a SIG on Heinz that includes the rolling stock? Any info on Heinz freight
cars or operations would be helpful.

Thanks,

Jerry Michels
**************Life should be easier. So should your homepage. Try the NEW
AOL.com.
(http://www.aol.com/?optin=new-dp&;icid=aolcom40vanity&ncid=emlcntaolcom00000002)


Clasp brakes on trucks

al.kresse <water.kresse@...>
 

This is at the early portion of this FC list's era.

What were the advantages of clasp vs. more-modern FC brakes . . . over
just adding fifty-percent more to doubling the pads? Many six-wheel
trucked cars used these in the 1920s. When did they disappear on North
American FCs (currently used on high-speed pass loco's)? Did the CD
vs. AB brake schedule change their advantages? Did they made it harder
or easier to balance clamping pressures. They appear to have violated
the KISS principle, and made the truck assemblies longer and heavier.

Al Kresse


Re: Pipe Loads

Richard Brennan <brennan8@...>
 

Re: Pipe Loads

Some STMFC images from on-line library sources:

Corrugated culvert on CNW flat - 1932
<http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/whi/fullimage.asp?id=17807>;

Jack Delano photo of gondolas with pipe for the WW-II "Big Inch" - May 1943
<http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/fsa/8d18000/8d18200/8d18277u.tif>;

More "Big Inch" pipe in composite gon - May 1943
<http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/fsa/8d18000/8d18300/8d18321u.tif>;

Pipe for Oklahoma oil fields - Oct 1942
<http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/fsa/8d44000/8d44900/8d44991u.tif>;

Pipes for oil fields - Maricopa CA, circa-1910?
<http://ulibimage.ucdavis.edu/speccoll/east01/full/P-1298.jpg>;

Redwood Pipe on ATSF flat - Pittsburg CA circa-1915-25
<http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/FindingAids/dynaweb/calher/redwood/figures/I0026212A.jpg>;

Redwood Pipe in PRR gon and ATSF boxcar - Pittsburg CA circa-1915-25
<http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/FindingAids/dynaweb/calher/redwood/figures/I0026209A.jpg>;


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------


Re: construction pipes

Steve SANDIFER
 

Well, looks like some of the links don't work.

Go to Library of Congress photos and search for photos with railroad and pipe. You will get many photos unrelated to this discussions but several gems. The one at the bottom show a truck unloading pipe from a gondola - a scene I plan on modeling on a house track.

The late 40s and early 50s were the time when a lot of pipe lines were being built and pipe was taken to even the most remote little station.

----- Original Message -----
From: Steve Sandifer
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, December 02, 2008 11:37 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] construction pipes


Maybe these will be helpful. I especially like the last two.

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/I?fsaall:1:./temp/~pp_Fbn1::displayType=1:m856sd=fsa:m856sf=8d18250:@@@fsaal

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/i?pp/fsaall:@FILREQ(@FIELD(DOCID+@LIT(owi2001027295/PP))+@FIELD(COLLID+fsa))

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/I?fsaall,app,brum,detr,swann,look,gottscho,pan,horyd,genthe,var,cai,cd,hh,yan,lomax,ils,prok,brhc,nclc,matpc,iucpub,tgmi,lamb,hec:23:./temp/~pp_e0FV::displayType=1:m856sd=fsa:m856sf=8d44991:@@@mdb=fsaall,app,brum,detr,swann,look,gottscho,pan,horyd,genthe,var,cai,cd,hh,yan,lomax,ils,prok,brhc,nclc,matpc,iucpub,tgmi,lamb,hec

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?fsaall:30:./temp/~pp_e0FV::@@@mdb=fsaall,app,brum,detr,swann,look,gottscho,pan,horyd,genthe,var,cai,cd,hh,yan,lomax,ils,prok,brhc,nclc,matpc,iucpub,tgmi,lamb,hec

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/i?pp/fsaall:@FILREQ(@FIELD(DOCID+@LIT(owi2001011889/PP))+@FIELD(COLLID+fsa))

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/i?pp/fsaall:@FILREQ(@FIELD(DOCID+@LIT(owi2001011891/PP))+@FIELD(COLLID+fsa))

----- Original Message -----
From: ed_mines
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, December 02, 2008 9:04 AM
Subject: [STMFC] construction pipes

Aren't lot of these construction pipes (like the vitreous clay pipes)
a lot shorter than 40 feet?

Wouldn't at least some of them be loaded in gondolas?

I'm guessing that they are too heavy for a man to lift (steal) by
himself.

Ed


Re: construction pipes

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Al Brown wrote:
Referring back to Tony's comment: to be loaded through the side door of a boxcar, I'd think the pipe couldn't be much over half the length of the car.
The pipe sections in the photo look to be about six feet long. The manufacture of VCP is nothing like iron pipe, which can be drawn or extruded to considerable lengths and then cut to the desired size.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: construction pipes

SUVCWORR@...
 

Having had some experience with water well drilling pipe, the sections were
39 feet same length as rail. I suspect that was established because it would
fit in a standard 40 ft gon. I once worked for a company that had its own
wells in the basement of a groundskeepers house. We had to remove part of the
roof to pull the pipe when it developed holes. It used a submersible pump
and the well was 389 feet deep. We has to pull all of it.

Rich Orr

In a message dated 12/2/2008 11:20:11 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
ed_mines@yahoo.com writes:

Aren't lot of these construction pipes (like the vitreous clay pipes)
a lot shorter than 40 feet?

Wouldn't at least some of them be loaded in gondolas?

I'm guessing that they are too heavy for a man to lift (steal) by
himself.

Ed


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Re: construction pipes

Steve SANDIFER
 

Maybe these will be helpful. I especially like the last two.

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/I?fsaall:1:./temp/~pp_Fbn1::displayType=1:m856sd=fsa:m856sf=8d18250:@@@fsaal

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/i?pp/fsaall:@FILREQ(@FIELD(DOCID+@LIT(owi2001027295/PP))+@FIELD(COLLID+fsa))

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/I?fsaall,app,brum,detr,swann,look,gottscho,pan,horyd,genthe,var,cai,cd,hh,yan,lomax,ils,prok,brhc,nclc,matpc,iucpub,tgmi,lamb,hec:23:./temp/~pp_e0FV::displayType=1:m856sd=fsa:m856sf=8d44991:@@@mdb=fsaall,app,brum,detr,swann,look,gottscho,pan,horyd,genthe,var,cai,cd,hh,yan,lomax,ils,prok,brhc,nclc,matpc,iucpub,tgmi,lamb,hec

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?fsaall:30:./temp/~pp_e0FV::@@@mdb=fsaall,app,brum,detr,swann,look,gottscho,pan,horyd,genthe,var,cai,cd,hh,yan,lomax,ils,prok,brhc,nclc,matpc,iucpub,tgmi,lamb,hec

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/i?pp/fsaall:@FILREQ(@FIELD(DOCID+@LIT(owi2001011889/PP))+@FIELD(COLLID+fsa))

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/i?pp/fsaall:@FILREQ(@FIELD(DOCID+@LIT(owi2001011891/PP))+@FIELD(COLLID+fsa))

----- Original Message -----
From: ed_mines
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, December 02, 2008 9:04 AM
Subject: [STMFC] construction pipes


Aren't lot of these construction pipes (like the vitreous clay pipes)
a lot shorter than 40 feet?

Wouldn't at least some of them be loaded in gondolas?

I'm guessing that they are too heavy for a man to lift (steal) by
himself.

Ed


Re: construction pipes

al_brown03
 

Referring back to Tony's comment: to be loaded through the side door
of a boxcar, I'd think the pipe couldn't be much over half the length
of the car.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "ed_mines" <ed_mines@...> wrote:

Aren't lot of these construction pipes (like the vitreous clay
pipes)
a lot shorter than 40 feet?

Wouldn't at least some of them be loaded in gondolas?

I'm guessing that they are too heavy for a man to lift (steal) by
himself.

Ed


Re: Heinz freight car fleet

Raymond Young
 

Jerry,

Go to Model Train Magazine Index on Google.  Search with the keyword Heinz.  There were 10 hits including some refrigerator cars.

Regards,
Virgil Young
Amarillo, TX




________________________________
From: "asychis@aol.com" <asychis@aol.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, December 2, 2008 10:58:26 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Heinz freight car fleet


Hi,

At one time or another I believe there were some good articles on the Heinz
fleet in either Rail Model Journal, Mainline, or Mainline Modeler. I cannot
remember which,and I wonder if someone on the list might point me in the
right direction. I searched previous messages, and found little. Also, is there
a SIG on Heinz that includes the rolling stock? Any info on Heinz freight
cars or operations would be helpful.

Thanks,

Jerry Michels
************ **Life should be easier. So should your homepage. Try the NEW
AOL.com.
(http://www.aol. com/?optin= new-dp&icid= aolcom40vanity& ncid=emlcntaolco m00000002)

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Philadelphia Quartz Type 21 tank car

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Nov 27, 2008, at 2:21 PM, Brian Leppert wrote:

My Buckeye ARA truck does NOT represent a double truss truck. It does
represent a side frame design where the lower chords are an "inverted
U-section", much like the upper chords. They differ from the upper
chords in that their sides curve in at the bottom and leave a lip
around the openings on the bottom....
The prototype trucks in the photo have normal U-section lower
chords. Notice that a raised beading completely encircles each side
frame window. The TMW Buckeye truck differs on this detail, but
still, I think, comes the closest with its spring plank, close spring
spacing, and open bolster end details.











Owing to the holidays, I'm several days late in responding to this,
but I feel obliged to say that Brian is entirely correct and that my
post was based (though it should not have been) on an erroneous
recollection. Mea culpa. I should have walked ten feet from my
office into my shop and actually looked at the trucks.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

John Swanson <dwlscbq@...>
 

This will bear on pipe loads.
My Father-in-Law was in charge of large plumbing crews, (as I recall) several hundred men, at Clinton Corn Processing.
He told me of working in a pit with up to 1200 PSI steam lines, caustic lines, acid lines, product lines, and so fourth running around him.
The pipes would be up to 6 feet in diameter and would often be so large that industrial cranes were required to install them.
Clinton Corn always had at least 30, repeat 30, plumbing crews working. They installed new pipe lines and replaced pipe around the plant.

I nearly hired out in the drafting department which had in excess of 20 men in the mid 1960's. The main function of the department was to measure and figure out how to fit in new piping lines and then draft the result.Pipe is a large factor in a grain processing industry.

My main point is that the wall thickness of the pipe is determined by its application.

John Swanson


Northern Pacific Lettering Changes

railsnw1 <railsnw@...>
 

I have been trying to get a better understanding on the changes to the
lettering on Northern Pacific boxcars. In looking through a number of
photos from around the late 30's I'm seeing NP cars with the
arched "NORTHERN PACIFIC" and below it the car number only without
the "N.P.".

Does anyone have a time frame when this type of lettering would have
changed to the reporting marks above the car number?

Thanks,

Richard Wilkens


construction pipes

ed_mines
 

Aren't lot of these construction pipes (like the vitreous clay pipes)
a lot shorter than 40 feet?

Wouldn't at least some of them be loaded in gondolas?

I'm guessing that they are too heavy for a man to lift (steal) by
himself.

Ed


Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

Tim O'Connor
 

What is the typical diameter of drill pipe?

At 12/2/2008 08:45 AM Tuesday, you wrote:
Gents,

There's bee no mention here of "Drill Pipe" as used in the petroleum
exploration and well drill drilling.


Heinz freight car fleet

asychis@...
 

Hi,

At one time or another I believe there were some good articles on the Heinz
fleet in either Rail Model Journal, Mainline, or Mainline Modeler. I cannot
remember which,and I wonder if someone on the list might point me in the
right direction. I searched previous messages, and found little. Also, is there
a SIG on Heinz that includes the rolling stock? Any info on Heinz freight
cars or operations would be helpful.

Thanks,

Jerry Michels
**************Life should be easier. So should your homepage. Try the NEW
AOL.com.
(http://www.aol.com/?optin=new-dp&;icid=aolcom40vanity&ncid=emlcntaolcom00000002)


Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

Malcolm H. Houck
 

Gents,

There's bee no mention here of "Drill Pipe" as used in the petroleum
exploration and well drill drilling. This certainly was shipped via rail, given the
remote locations (distanced from mills) of many oil fields. In the era of
this list the U.S. was a major export provider of not only the oil but well
drilling equipment. My recollection is that, after oil was discovered in the
Arabian Peninsula (in the 1930's), the Port of Baltimore was a principal east
coast venue for the shipment of drill pipe. I also seem to recall photo images
of rail shipments of drill pipe on some of the Colorado narrow gauge lines for
drilling in such fields as were within the Colorado narrow gauge "circle."

Mal Houck
**************Life should be easier. So should your homepage. Try the NEW
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