Date   

Do Not Hump Decal

pennsylvania1954
 

A very mundane question: can anyone point me toward an HO decal set
that has the slogan "Do Not Hump" in white letters?

Thanks for the help!

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL


Re: Prototype Rails 2009 -- my opinions

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

----- Original Message -----

From: Aley, Jeff A
. . . Bruce Smith displayed a flat car with a boiler load that used Archer decal rivets. They looked great (and in fact, the car is pictured on the Archer website).

----- Original Message -----

Do you have a link to the photos? I could not find it here: http://www.archertransfers.com/

KL


Re: Prototype Rails 2009 -- my opinions

Jason Sanford <parkcitybranch@...>
 

Good write up.  Any pictures of the event?
 
Jason Sanford

--- On Sun, 1/11/09, Aley, Jeff A <Jeff.A.Aley@intel.com> wrote:

From: Aley, Jeff A <Jeff.A.Aley@intel.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Prototype Rails 2009 -- my opinions
To: "STMFC@yahoogroups.com" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sunday, January 11, 2009, 9:01 AM

Prototype Rails 2009, in Cocoa Beach, FL, was a good meeting. I am the Clinic
Chairman, and here are my biased comments.

As usual, it was a lot of work and a lot of fun. Attendance was pretty good;
we had 241 folks show up, down slightly from last year's ~275. Considering
the state of the economy, I think this is pretty good.

I attended a few clinics when I wasn't running around keeping things on
track. Here are my impressions:

Greg Komar did a clinic on model photography. I learned a lot about lighting.
Greg showed how much more realistic a model photo can be if you give it strong
light that casts sharp, dark shadows, instead of that uniform gray light we all
get from our fluorescent tubes. If you want to show off your underbody
detailing, go for the uniform "high overcast" lighting. But if you
want a photo that looks like a prototype photo, go with a bright point-source
light to simulate the sun. He also demonstrated Helicon Focus, and after seeing
it in person, I'm sold on it!

Brian Carlson showed how he analyzed a bunch of yard photos to confirm the
Nelson - Gilbert boxcar distribution model, and then how he applied that to his
model fleet. He took the analysis a step farther by examining each of the
railroads with large fleets, and determining what type or class of cars best
represent a given RR.

Greg Martin, with help from Denny Anspach, presented this year's
Shake-n-Take clinic. Denny gave a tutorial on how to install Accumate scale
couplers (w/ scale coupler boxes / draft gear) and the proper air hose w/ PSC
bracket. Greg then showed us how to kitbash the Accurail stock car to produce a
UP S-40-10. The kitbash included new resin ends from Southern Car &
Foundry. I know there were many folks who worked behind the scenes to make this
clinic happen, and I will let Greg or Denny point out who those folks are (lest
I leave someone out).

Jon Addison showed how he makes realistic water. He demonstrated how he paints
the bottom of a stream, and how he applies DAP Crystal-Clear caulk (not
"clear", but "Crystal Clear") for waves. The caulk usually
is applied over a layer of Envirotex. He also showed how he uses Liquitex Gloss
Medium and poly-fiber to make rapids. The latter was the most impressive to me.
I had heard of people using poly-fiber to make rapids, and I had even seen some
examples, but none was as good as Jon's. He stressed that with poly-fiber,
"less is more".

Jim Murrie showed how he built a prototypical model of a large passenger
terminal. He selected Everett St. Station on the MILW as his prototype. He
showed a lot about the passenger train operations (switching out various cars
between trains) and how there was plenty of passenger action to keep operations
interesting.

Finally, I moderated a panel on boxcar distribution, and how it influences the
fleets of boxcars that we should have on our railroads. The distinguised panel
included Brian Carlson, Armand Premo, Larry Kline, Frank Peacock, and Mike
Brock, with lively comments thrown in from the audience by Bruce Smith. There
was some debate, but the general consensus was that one should start with the
Gilbert-Nelson model (boxcars in proportion to the national averages), and then
adjust it for home road cars and interchange partners. The latter should be
dealt with carefully, since some roads interchanged more traffic than others
(e.g. SP-UP (many cars) vs WP-UP (few cars) at Ogden, UT). Armand also clearly
showed that Canadian cars had a big impact on roads near the border. Era and
even season (grain rush) is also a factor.

Other thoughts:
The hotel did well, as usual. Nobody bothered with their lunch - everyone
chose to go out, for various reasons. Dinner was pretty good and the banquet
was surprisingly quick. The weather was all that we had hoped for - sunny and
warm. Many folks are not looking forward to going home to deep snow and ice.

As usual the model displays were great. Bruce Smith displayed a flat car with
a boiler load that used Archer decal rivets. They looked great (and in fact,
the car is pictured on the Archer website). Bruce explained to me how he did
it, and I'm going to buy some Archer rivet decals very soon. Ted Culotta
uses the "small" rivets in some of the patterns for his resin kits.
I also learned a bunch of stuff about laser kits from Jon Cagle, and a bunch
about the St. Louis RPM meet from John Golden. I also had a quick look at the
war-emergency box cars from IM (I'm not really qualified to review them).
There were lots of good folks to talk to, and lots of good stuff to learn.

I will look forward to comments from other attendees to see what they thought
of Prototype Rails 2009.

Regards,

-Jeff







------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Prototype Rails 2009 -- my opinions

Aley, Jeff A
 

Prototype Rails 2009, in Cocoa Beach, FL, was a good meeting. I am the Clinic Chairman, and here are my biased comments.

As usual, it was a lot of work and a lot of fun. Attendance was pretty good; we had 241 folks show up, down slightly from last year's ~275. Considering the state of the economy, I think this is pretty good.

I attended a few clinics when I wasn't running around keeping things on track. Here are my impressions:

Greg Komar did a clinic on model photography. I learned a lot about lighting. Greg showed how much more realistic a model photo can be if you give it strong light that casts sharp, dark shadows, instead of that uniform gray light we all get from our fluorescent tubes. If you want to show off your underbody detailing, go for the uniform "high overcast" lighting. But if you want a photo that looks like a prototype photo, go with a bright point-source light to simulate the sun. He also demonstrated Helicon Focus, and after seeing it in person, I'm sold on it!

Brian Carlson showed how he analyzed a bunch of yard photos to confirm the Nelson - Gilbert boxcar distribution model, and then how he applied that to his model fleet. He took the analysis a step farther by examining each of the railroads with large fleets, and determining what type or class of cars best represent a given RR.

Greg Martin, with help from Denny Anspach, presented this year's Shake-n-Take clinic. Denny gave a tutorial on how to install Accumate scale couplers (w/ scale coupler boxes / draft gear) and the proper air hose w/ PSC bracket. Greg then showed us how to kitbash the Accurail stock car to produce a UP S-40-10. The kitbash included new resin ends from Southern Car & Foundry. I know there were many folks who worked behind the scenes to make this clinic happen, and I will let Greg or Denny point out who those folks are (lest I leave someone out).

Jon Addison showed how he makes realistic water. He demonstrated how he paints the bottom of a stream, and how he applies DAP Crystal-Clear caulk (not "clear", but "Crystal Clear") for waves. The caulk usually is applied over a layer of Envirotex. He also showed how he uses Liquitex Gloss Medium and poly-fiber to make rapids. The latter was the most impressive to me. I had heard of people using poly-fiber to make rapids, and I had even seen some examples, but none was as good as Jon's. He stressed that with poly-fiber, "less is more".

Jim Murrie showed how he built a prototypical model of a large passenger terminal. He selected Everett St. Station on the MILW as his prototype. He showed a lot about the passenger train operations (switching out various cars between trains) and how there was plenty of passenger action to keep operations interesting.

Finally, I moderated a panel on boxcar distribution, and how it influences the fleets of boxcars that we should have on our railroads. The distinguised panel included Brian Carlson, Armand Premo, Larry Kline, Frank Peacock, and Mike Brock, with lively comments thrown in from the audience by Bruce Smith. There was some debate, but the general consensus was that one should start with the Gilbert-Nelson model (boxcars in proportion to the national averages), and then adjust it for home road cars and interchange partners. The latter should be dealt with carefully, since some roads interchanged more traffic than others (e.g. SP-UP (many cars) vs WP-UP (few cars) at Ogden, UT). Armand also clearly showed that Canadian cars had a big impact on roads near the border. Era and even season (grain rush) is also a factor.

Other thoughts:
The hotel did well, as usual. Nobody bothered with their lunch - everyone chose to go out, for various reasons. Dinner was pretty good and the banquet was surprisingly quick. The weather was all that we had hoped for - sunny and warm. Many folks are not looking forward to going home to deep snow and ice.

As usual the model displays were great. Bruce Smith displayed a flat car with a boiler load that used Archer decal rivets. They looked great (and in fact, the car is pictured on the Archer website). Bruce explained to me how he did it, and I'm going to buy some Archer rivet decals very soon. Ted Culotta uses the "small" rivets in some of the patterns for his resin kits. I also learned a bunch of stuff about laser kits from Jon Cagle, and a bunch about the St. Louis RPM meet from John Golden. I also had a quick look at the war-emergency box cars from IM (I'm not really qualified to review them). There were lots of good folks to talk to, and lots of good stuff to learn.

I will look forward to comments from other attendees to see what they thought of Prototype Rails 2009.

Regards,

-Jeff


Re: Loose coal in boxcars

Mark Mathu
 

That reminds me of a Lionel giraffe car!
http://www.postwarlionel.com/cgi-bin/postwar?ITEM=3376
My wife is a transit planner, and 15 years ago she worked on the
Milwaukee light rail system (never built - but when she transferred to
that project is when we met, so I guess every dark cloud has a silver
lining). Milwaukee was known for its annual circus parade and one of
the features was a giraffe which stuck it's head out of a hole in the
roof of a circus wagon, kind of like that Lionel car. The circus
parade route was on one of the light rail routes.

The light rail planners had to spend a little time determining what
the maximum design height of a giraffe sticking out of a circus wagon
would actually be... if a giraffe would have hit the planned 600-volt
line it would have been a public relations nightmare...

__________
Mark Mathu
Whitefish Bay, Wis.


Re: Boxcar details, CBQ 18400-18699

Rupert & Maureen <gamlenz@...>
 

Mark

My apologies. I edited my original reply and put things back to front. I should have said "With the exception of 18700-19399 (which were built with truck type 81)".

18400-699 were built with the ASF type A-3 ride control version.

Sorry about that.

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Mark Heiden" <mark_heiden@hotmail.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, January 11, 2009 11:51 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Boxcar details, CBQ 18400-18699


Hi Rupert,

Thanks for the information. What sort of trucks are the type 81? I've
got a fairly clear shot of CBQ 18471, and it has trucks that look
very much like an ASF A-3 ride control. Does the type 81 look similar
to an ASF A-3?

Thanks,
Mark Heiden

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Rupert & Maureen" <gamlenz@...> wrote:


Mark

To broaden your target for photos, other cars in class XM-32C were
18700-19399 (built 1951), C&S 1250-1499 (built 1950-1) and FW&D
9001-9250
(built 1951).

With the exception 18400-699 (which were built with truck type
81,) the
XM-32C's were built with truck type 79 (ASF type A-3 ride control
version)


Re: Boxcar details, CBQ 18400-18699

Mark Heiden
 

Hi Rupert,

Thanks for the information. What sort of trucks are the type 81? I've
got a fairly clear shot of CBQ 18471, and it has trucks that look
very much like an ASF A-3 ride control. Does the type 81 look similar
to an ASF A-3?

Thanks,
Mark Heiden

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Rupert & Maureen" <gamlenz@...> wrote:


Mark

To broaden your target for photos, other cars in class XM-32C were
18700-19399 (built 1951), C&S 1250-1499 (built 1950-1) and FW&D
9001-9250
(built 1951).

With the exception 18400-699 (which were built with truck type
81,) the
XM-32C's were built with truck type 79 (ASF type A-3 ride control
version)

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@...>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, January 11, 2009 7:15 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Boxcar details, CBQ 18400-18699


Mark

A photo of CB&Q 18675 shows AJAX handbrake and APEX (grid style)
running board and brake step. Bracket-style grab irons. Also, no
poling pockets. The trucks are in shadow and can't be identified.

Tim O'Connor


I'm gathering information on some Burlington boxcars, series CBQ
18400-
18699 (class XM-32c), for a possible future project, and I have a
few
questions about these cars. Could anyone tell me:

1) What running boards these cars were built with?

2) What handbrakes were used?

3) Were these cars equipped with brake adjustors? I have one
photo that
may show a Universal Rotary Brake Adjustor on CBQ 18682, but I am
not
certain.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Mark Heiden


Re: Stripping Trix UP boxcar

spsalso
 


Marklin offered these in sets of ten, with about that many
different
UP lettering schemes, every one with all-yellow lettering.
I picked up a boxed set of 20 of the Trix 40' UP boxcars when "the
price was right". There are four different basic schemes including
the early white and yellow "Road of the Streamliners".

Ed

Edward Sutorik


Re: Boxcar details, CBQ 18400-18699

Rupert & Maureen <gamlenz@...>
 

Mark

To broaden your target for photos, other cars in class XM-32C were 18700-19399 (built 1951), C&S 1250-1499 (built 1950-1) and FW&D 9001-9250 (built 1951).

With the exception 18400-699 (which were built with truck type 81,) the XM-32C's were built with truck type 79 (ASF type A-3 ride control version)

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@comcast.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, January 11, 2009 7:15 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Boxcar details, CBQ 18400-18699


Mark

A photo of CB&Q 18675 shows AJAX handbrake and APEX (grid style)
running board and brake step. Bracket-style grab irons. Also, no
poling pockets. The trucks are in shadow and can't be identified.

Tim O'Connor


I'm gathering information on some Burlington boxcars, series CBQ 18400-
18699 (class XM-32c), for a possible future project, and I have a few
questions about these cars. Could anyone tell me:

1) What running boards these cars were built with?

2) What handbrakes were used?

3) Were these cars equipped with brake adjustors? I have one photo that
may show a Universal Rotary Brake Adjustor on CBQ 18682, but I am not
certain.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Mark Heiden


Re: Boxcar details, CBQ 18400-18699

Tim O'Connor
 

Mark

A photo of CB&Q 18675 shows AJAX handbrake and APEX (grid style)
running board and brake step. Bracket-style grab irons. Also, no
poling pockets. The trucks are in shadow and can't be identified.

Tim O'Connor

I'm gathering information on some Burlington boxcars, series CBQ 18400-
18699 (class XM-32c), for a possible future project, and I have a few
questions about these cars. Could anyone tell me:

1) What running boards these cars were built with?

2) What handbrakes were used?

3) Were these cars equipped with brake adjustors? I have one photo that
may show a Universal Rotary Brake Adjustor on CBQ 18682, but I am not
certain.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Mark Heiden


Boxcar details, CBQ 18400-18699

Mark Heiden
 

Hello everyone,

I'm gathering information on some Burlington boxcars, series CBQ 18400-
18699 (class XM-32c), for a possible future project, and I have a few
questions about these cars. Could anyone tell me:

1) What running boards these cars were built with?

2) What handbrakes were used?

3) Were these cars equipped with brake adjustors? I have one photo that
may show a Universal Rotary Brake Adjustor on CBQ 18682, but I am not
certain.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Mark Heiden


Re: Stripping Trix UP boxcar

Robert kirkham
 

Thanks Tom,

I couldn't manage Cocoa this year either - maybe next. In any event, those temperatures don't seem to hard to manage. But I take your point - I'll wait for the RMC article to be published.

Rob Kirkham

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Tom Madden" <tgmadden@worldnet.att.net>
Sent: Friday, January 09, 2009 11:25 PM
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Stripping Trix UP boxcar

Rob Kirkham asked:

Tom, that's interesting as I have some of these cars to work on too.
I wonder about what temperature your ultrasonic cleaner raises the
temperature of the cleaning fluid to? I don't have one, but could
raise the temperature in other less sophisticated ways (in a closed
container - I don't think the fumes are a good idea to have around).
It was only warm - maybe 80 to 85 F. Ted's article is supposed to be in
the February RMC which should be showing up any day. I didn't do Cocoa
Beach this year so can't ask Ted if he has any particular hints, and I
suspect he and many of the STMFC "names" at Cocoa Beach are off-list
for the duration.

Tom Madden



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: Atlas '32 AAR Box - new models - "May 2009" arrival

water.kresse@...
 

Are these O-scale or H0?

Al Kresse

-------------- Original message --------------
From: "devansprr" <devans1@erols.com>
Just received the Atlas e-mail update. The January 2009 announcements
include 6 new paint schemes and 3 "body styles" to include Murphy,
Viking, and "11 panel flat riveted roofs", each with different ends.

Road names are CofG (a 60's paint scheme), Erie in both 1932 and 1947
paint (primarily different size heralds), Lousiana and Arkansas,
Seaboard "Orange Blossom Special", and what I think is a 1930's UP
scheme. Roof and ends are not noted in the text, but the keen eyes in
this group can probably discern this from the artwork - assuming it is
accurate. If it isn't, there may be time to set Atlas straight?

All three body styles also will be offered undecorated.

Looks like Atlas is coming through on their promise to offer many car
configurations and schemes.

Four of the schemes fit my WWII era, assuming a few UP boxcars would
still be out there without the yellow script messages on the side
("Route of the streamliners"?).

Well done Atlas.

Price TBA. Now that the dollar has rebounded, and plastic is cheap
once again, does anyone think the price may actually drop? ;-(

Dave Evans


Re: Atlas '32 AAR Box - new models - "May 2009" arrival

Arnold van Heyst
 

Dave,

Couldn't find it.
Can you please give me  link?

Regards,
Arnold van Heyst
Netherlands.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/heyst/




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Stripping Trix UP boxcar

Tom Madden <tgmadden@...>
 

Rob Kirkham asked:

Tom, that's interesting as I have some of these cars to work on too.
I wonder about what temperature your ultrasonic cleaner raises the
temperature of the cleaning fluid to? I don't have one, but could
raise the temperature in other less sophisticated ways (in a closed
container - I don't think the fumes are a good idea to have around).
It was only warm - maybe 80 to 85 F. Ted's article is supposed to be in
the February RMC which should be showing up any day. I didn't do Cocoa
Beach this year so can't ask Ted if he has any particular hints, and I
suspect he and many of the STMFC "names" at Cocoa Beach are off-list
for the duration.

Tom Madden


Stripping Trix UP boxcar

Robert kirkham
 

Tom, that's interesting as I have some of these cars to work on too. I wonder about what temperature your ultrasonic cleaner raises the temperature of the cleaning fluid to? I don't have one, but could raise the temperature in other less sophisticated ways (in a closed container - I don't think the fumes are a good idea to have around).

Rob Kirkham

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Tom Madden" <tgmadden@worldnet.att.net>
Sent: Friday, January 09, 2009 3:08 PM
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Stripping Trix UP boxcar

...
That did the trick, but it wasn't straightforward. Soaking for half
an hour and scrubbing with an old toothbrush eventually took off the
large UNION PACIFIC and BE SPECIFIC lettering pretty cleanly, but the
smaller lettering was unmoved. So, into the ultrasonic cleaner and,
once the energy of the ultrasonic had heated the Wash Away, the
lettering and all the paint literally blew off the shell. (I put the
Wash Away in a tall jar, and put that into the ultrasonic cleaner,
which had a couple inches of water in it.) So now I'm removing the
roof from the model and will replace it with a correct IMWX/Red
Caboose roof.
...
Guess I'll strip and reletter my Trix A-50-19 while I'm at it.

Tom Madden


Re: Atlas '32 AAR Box - new models - "May 2009" arrival

Ed Hawkins
 

On Jan 9, 2009, at 5:14 PM, devansprr wrote:

Four of the schemes fit my WWII era, assuming a few UP boxcars would
still be out there without the yellow script messages on the side
("Route of the streamliners"?).
Dave,
A "few" UP box cars wouldn't be prototypical since UP had only one car
of this type, number 182500, B-50-18, built 5-36. Builder's photos
appear on pages 77-78 in Terry Metcalfe's book Union Pacific Freight
Cars as well as a broadside view in Ted's 1932 ARA box car book.
Perhaps someone knows of an in-service photo of the car having train
slogans, but it wasn't published in either of these books. The
builder's photo shows a simple scheme lacking any slogans.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Atlas '32 AAR Box - new models - "May 2009" arrival

devansprr
 

Just received the Atlas e-mail update. The January 2009 announcements
include 6 new paint schemes and 3 "body styles" to include Murphy,
Viking, and "11 panel flat riveted roofs", each with different ends.

Road names are CofG (a 60's paint scheme), Erie in both 1932 and 1947
paint (primarily different size heralds), Lousiana and Arkansas,
Seaboard "Orange Blossom Special", and what I think is a 1930's UP
scheme. Roof and ends are not noted in the text, but the keen eyes in
this group can probably discern this from the artwork - assuming it is
accurate. If it isn't, there may be time to set Atlas straight?

All three body styles also will be offered undecorated.

Looks like Atlas is coming through on their promise to offer many car
configurations and schemes.

Four of the schemes fit my WWII era, assuming a few UP boxcars would
still be out there without the yellow script messages on the side
("Route of the streamliners"?).

Well done Atlas.

Price TBA. Now that the dollar has rebounded, and plastic is cheap
once again, does anyone think the price may actually drop? ;-(

Dave Evans


Re: Stripping Trix UP boxcar

Tom Madden <tgmadden@...>
 

In late October I posted this:

Are the Trix and Marklin B-50-24/27 the same? I bought two of the
Marklin models with the Be Specific with large UNION PACIFIC
lettering when they first came out and would certainly use the
above parts and decals to upgrade/backdate them. Problem is, I was
unable to strip the one Marklin I tried using any paint stripper on
hand. (Brake fluid, Chameleon, Scalecoat, all with ultrasonic,
alcohol without ultrasonic.) I finally tried a light, low-angle
grit blast, but that removed the rivets as well as the paint. So
now I have one.
Any ideas??
To follow this up, Ted Culotta's next Essential Freight Cars article
is supposed to cover upgrading this model. He's been offering the
Trix/Marklin model through his eBay store packaged with his welded
underframe and decals, if anyone wants to get a head start. The eBay
listing shows a beautiful relettered model, and notes the original
car was stripped with Scalecoat stripper for plastics. In light of my
previous failure to strip one of these models, and armed with a lot
of respect for Ted and his abilities, I put on my WWTD (What Would
Ted Do) T-shirt, hied myself off to Caboose Hobbies and bought a new
bottle of Scalecoat Wash Away.

That did the trick, but it wasn't straightforward. Soaking for half
an hour and scrubbing with an old toothbrush eventually took off the
large UNION PACIFIC and BE SPECIFIC lettering pretty cleanly, but the
smaller lettering was unmoved. So, into the ultrasonic cleaner and,
once the energy of the ultrasonic had heated the Wash Away, the
lettering and all the paint literally blew off the shell. (I put the
Wash Away in a tall jar, and put that into the ultrasonic cleaner,
which had a couple inches of water in it.) So now I'm removing the
roof from the model and will replace it with a correct IMWX/Red
Caboose roof.

Marklin offered these in sets of ten, with about that many different
UP lettering schemes, every one with all-yellow lettering. From the
way the shell stripped, I'm guessing the lettering common to all the
versions was printed and cured first, with the version-specific
lettering printed separately. That would give the small lettering a
double cure - either heat or UV, I suspect - and explain its
reluctance to depart the shell until the underlying paint fell away.

Guess I'll strip and reletter my Trix A-50-19 while I'm at it.

Tom Madden


New HO & S resin kits coming ...

Jim King
 

My recent announcement re: upcoming S scale resin kits (B&O M53 wagontop box
and SAL B7 turtleback box) has now spread into HO, at least for the B&O car.
I'm pleased to announce a collaboration between Smoky Mtn. Model Works and
Wright Trak Models on the M53. CAD work will start in 2 weeks with a target
release date of the HO car in March and the S car right behind it. The kit
will include the "plain" and Youngstown doors with every intent toward
making them operable (no guarantees). At least 3 paint schemes are planned.



Next is a new HO car now in production by Wright Trak. I delivered the
first 100 sets of the Southern 1951 Spencer-built wood rack body and
underframe castings (with brass strip weights) to Gary this afternoon. He
will be the source for this car, so contact him for availability. Target
ship date is by month's end. They will be available direct and thru his
dealer network. These cars will be offered with Roman and Block font
decals, spanning 1951 until retirement in the early 80s. The C&O car I'm
producing in S will likely be offered by Gary, so if you're a C&O nut, let
him know you're interested.



2009 is gonna be a BIG year for HO and S resin kits!



Jim King

Smoky Mountain Model Works, Inc.

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com

103841 - 103860 of 182098