Date   

construction pipes

ed_mines
 

Aren't lot of these construction pipes (like the vitreous clay pipes)
a lot shorter than 40 feet?

Wouldn't at least some of them be loaded in gondolas?

I'm guessing that they are too heavy for a man to lift (steal) by
himself.

Ed


Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

Tim O'Connor
 

What is the typical diameter of drill pipe?

At 12/2/2008 08:45 AM Tuesday, you wrote:
Gents,

There's bee no mention here of "Drill Pipe" as used in the petroleum
exploration and well drill drilling.


Heinz freight car fleet

asychis@...
 

Hi,

At one time or another I believe there were some good articles on the Heinz
fleet in either Rail Model Journal, Mainline, or Mainline Modeler. I cannot
remember which,and I wonder if someone on the list might point me in the
right direction. I searched previous messages, and found little. Also, is there
a SIG on Heinz that includes the rolling stock? Any info on Heinz freight
cars or operations would be helpful.

Thanks,

Jerry Michels
**************Life should be easier. So should your homepage. Try the NEW
AOL.com.
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Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

Malcolm H. Houck
 

Gents,

There's bee no mention here of "Drill Pipe" as used in the petroleum
exploration and well drill drilling. This certainly was shipped via rail, given the
remote locations (distanced from mills) of many oil fields. In the era of
this list the U.S. was a major export provider of not only the oil but well
drilling equipment. My recollection is that, after oil was discovered in the
Arabian Peninsula (in the 1930's), the Port of Baltimore was a principal east
coast venue for the shipment of drill pipe. I also seem to recall photo images
of rail shipments of drill pipe on some of the Colorado narrow gauge lines for
drilling in such fields as were within the Colorado narrow gauge "circle."

Mal Houck
**************Life should be easier. So should your homepage. Try the NEW
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Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

Cyril Durrenberger
 

I suggest that you all look at "Southern Pacific Freight Cars, Vol 3".  There are a number of photos taken in the 1950's of flat cars loaded with steel pipe

See pages 244,  257,  267 and 273.

Cyril Durrenberger

--- On Mon, 12/1/08, Jack Burgess <jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com> wrote:
From: Jack Burgess <jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com>
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Pipe loads on the cheap
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, December 1, 2008, 7:54 PM











In discussing pipe types and modeling them, we need to keep a couple of

things in mind. First, which types of pipe were not manufactured locally and

thus might be shipped by rail? Iron pipe might be one type but concrete and

clay pipe might not. Second, we need to remember that we are talking about

pipe types from 60 years ago, not what is currently being used.



When I started working in a municipal engineering department in the

mid-1960s, vitrified clay pipe (VCP) was used for sanitary sewers and

probably had been for decades since it is resistant to acids and sewage. Now

days, in our area, VCP has been replaced for new installations by plastic

pipe since it is faster to install. VCP has a bell on one end with a rubber

gasket but I wonder if it was ever shipped by rail. If so, it is generally

in smaller diameters (12" is a very big sanitary sewer with 8" more typical)

and is red in color since it is made from clay. Interestingly, the Yosemite

Valley Railroad (built in 1906) had a lot of VCP storm water culverts, some

of which are still in place (but out of service <g>). These latter pipes

would have diameters from 12" to 24".



Storm water pipes are typically reinforced concrete pipe (RCP) but I'm not

sure how long RCP has been available... probably a long time. Again, I'm not

sure if it was shipped by rail. This pipe is still used and is joined via

"T&G" joints (meaning that there was no bell and one end has a female joint

with a reduced diameter on the outside of the joint area and the other end a

male joint) rather than a bell joint since leakage isn't a serious problem.

As the pipe is laid, these joints are mortared to minimize leakage. These

pipes are heavy and thus not that long. Larger diameter pipes are shorter

than smaller diameter pipes.



When I started working, water lines were laid in our area with

asbestos-cement pipe (ACP) but plastic is now used for obvious reasons. As I

recall, ACP is joined with via a "T&G" joint supplemented with a rubber

gasket. ACP was popular in areas where metallic pipes were subject to

external corrosion such as our Bay Area with salt water intrusion. Use of AC

pipe ceased due to health concerns associated with the mining, installation,

removal, and disposal of asbestos products. I guess that, due to the

location of asbestos mines vs. manufacturing plants, ACP might be shipped

via rail. ACP is typically smaller, 6-12" in diameter and white in color

with an asbestos texture. But ACP would have been widely used in the era

that we are modeling.



Natural gas lines in our area have been long been steel which is

field-welded together; there is no bell on these pipes since they were

welded together. Long distance transmission lines may be 30" or more in

diameter. There is no question that this pipe was transported by rail. We

also have a gasoline transmission line through our city which is also steel

(8" in diameter). It was originally used to transport jet fuel from a Shell

refinery to the San Jose Airport but was later used by transport gases used

in the high-tech industry but that was built outside our era.



In California, long-distance transportation of water is typical all over the

state. The early lines, such as the line from near Yosemite to serve San

Francisco, was riveted steel (60" and 76" in diameter) and without rereading

Ted Wurm's book on this construction project and its railroad, I'm not sure

that it was transported by rail but I can imagine that it was.



Ductile iron pipe is rarely used in our area due to salt intrusion below

grade. But it is extremely strong and has its advantages. It would have been

logically shipped via rail. This pipe has uses a bell joint.



One pipe type that hasn't been mentioned is galvanized corrugated metal pipe

(CMP) which is still used for storm water culverts. Because of the

specialized manufacturing processes required, these might have been shipped

by rail. Culverts range from 12" in diameter to 48" or more. Again, because

they are used for storm drain systems and water leakage isn't a problem, the

sections are joined with a collar as I recall.



In general, water line joints need to be pressure-proof and thus must have

strong joints requiring both a physical connection and a gasket. Sanitary

sewers also must not leak but aren't under pressure and bell joints work

okay. Storm drain systems don't need to be completely leak proof.



Jack Burgess

www.yosemitevalleyr r.com


Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

Cyril Durrenberger
 

I have started a photo album, if approved for photos of loads of pipe on railroad cars.  I loaded a photo of a ML&T flat car with a load of corrugated pipe circa 1914.  Early for most of you, but within the time period as I understand it.

Many pipe loads in Texas are for pipelines to carry crude oil, refined petroleum products and natural gas.  Also seems to me that there are some photos of D&RGW narrow gauge cars hauling pipe for pipelines just before the lines were shut down.

Cyril Durrenberger

--- On Mon, 12/1/08, Jack Burgess <jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com> wrote:
From: Jack Burgess <jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com>
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Pipe loads on the cheap
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, December 1, 2008, 7:54 PM











In discussing pipe types and modeling them, we need to keep a couple of

things in mind. First, which types of pipe were not manufactured locally and

thus might be shipped by rail? Iron pipe might be one type but concrete and

clay pipe might not. Second, we need to remember that we are talking about

pipe types from 60 years ago, not what is currently being used.



When I started working in a municipal engineering department in the

mid-1960s, vitrified clay pipe (VCP) was used for sanitary sewers and

probably had been for decades since it is resistant to acids and sewage. Now

days, in our area, VCP has been replaced for new installations by plastic

pipe since it is faster to install. VCP has a bell on one end with a rubber

gasket but I wonder if it was ever shipped by rail. If so, it is generally

in smaller diameters (12" is a very big sanitary sewer with 8" more typical)

and is red in color since it is made from clay. Interestingly, the Yosemite

Valley Railroad (built in 1906) had a lot of VCP storm water culverts, some

of which are still in place (but out of service <g>). These latter pipes

would have diameters from 12" to 24".



Storm water pipes are typically reinforced concrete pipe (RCP) but I'm not

sure how long RCP has been available... probably a long time. Again, I'm not

sure if it was shipped by rail. This pipe is still used and is joined via

"T&G" joints (meaning that there was no bell and one end has a female joint

with a reduced diameter on the outside of the joint area and the other end a

male joint) rather than a bell joint since leakage isn't a serious problem.

As the pipe is laid, these joints are mortared to minimize leakage. These

pipes are heavy and thus not that long. Larger diameter pipes are shorter

than smaller diameter pipes.



When I started working, water lines were laid in our area with

asbestos-cement pipe (ACP) but plastic is now used for obvious reasons. As I

recall, ACP is joined with via a "T&G" joint supplemented with a rubber

gasket. ACP was popular in areas where metallic pipes were subject to

external corrosion such as our Bay Area with salt water intrusion. Use of AC

pipe ceased due to health concerns associated with the mining, installation,

removal, and disposal of asbestos products. I guess that, due to the

location of asbestos mines vs. manufacturing plants, ACP might be shipped

via rail. ACP is typically smaller, 6-12" in diameter and white in color

with an asbestos texture. But ACP would have been widely used in the era

that we are modeling.



Natural gas lines in our area have been long been steel which is

field-welded together; there is no bell on these pipes since they were

welded together. Long distance transmission lines may be 30" or more in

diameter. There is no question that this pipe was transported by rail. We

also have a gasoline transmission line through our city which is also steel

(8" in diameter). It was originally used to transport jet fuel from a Shell

refinery to the San Jose Airport but was later used by transport gases used

in the high-tech industry but that was built outside our era.



In California, long-distance transportation of water is typical all over the

state. The early lines, such as the line from near Yosemite to serve San

Francisco, was riveted steel (60" and 76" in diameter) and without rereading

Ted Wurm's book on this construction project and its railroad, I'm not sure

that it was transported by rail but I can imagine that it was.



Ductile iron pipe is rarely used in our area due to salt intrusion below

grade. But it is extremely strong and has its advantages. It would have been

logically shipped via rail. This pipe has uses a bell joint.



One pipe type that hasn't been mentioned is galvanized corrugated metal pipe

(CMP) which is still used for storm water culverts. Because of the

specialized manufacturing processes required, these might have been shipped

by rail. Culverts range from 12" in diameter to 48" or more. Again, because

they are used for storm drain systems and water leakage isn't a problem, the

sections are joined with a collar as I recall.



In general, water line joints need to be pressure-proof and thus must have

strong joints requiring both a physical connection and a gasket. Sanitary

sewers also must not leak but aren't under pressure and bell joints work

okay. Storm drain systems don't need to be completely leak proof.



Jack Burgess

www.yosemitevalleyr r.com


























[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

Schuyler Larrabee
 

That's what I was talking about. But is "Fernco" a trade name? Doesn't sound like a generic term.

I think we'd better drop this anyhow, Sheriff Brock is very humorless these days, and I'm fairly
sure this joint is post-'60 . . .

SGL

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Steve Stull
Sent: Tuesday, December 02, 2008 12:08 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

--- On Mon, 12/1/08, Schuyler Larrabee <schuyler.larrabee@verizon.net
<mailto:schuyler.larrabee%40verizon.net> >
wrote:From: Schuyler Larrabee <schuyler.larrabee@verizon.net
<mailto:schuyler.larrabee%40verizon.net> >Subject:
RE: [STMFC] Re: Pipe loads on the cheapTo: STMFC@yahoogroups.comDate
<mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.comDate> : Monday, December 1, 2008, 6:32 PMNot necessarily. Both
steel pipe and
concrete pipe can be joined for some non-pressure uses (drain lines, for instance) with a band
which is drawn tight
around the pipe. There is a specific terminology for this, but I have forgotten it, if I ever knew
it to begin with.
SGLSchuyler;Trade name for those connections is a fernco. Kind of an oversized radiatior hose
clamp with a rubber
gasket between the clamp and the pipes being joined.Steve StullWinslow 7076






Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

Steve Stull
 

--- On Mon, 12/1/08, Schuyler Larrabee <schuyler.larrabee@verizon.net> wrote:From: Schuyler Larrabee <schuyler.larrabee@verizon.net>Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Pipe loads on the cheapTo: STMFC@yahoogroups.comDate: Monday, December 1, 2008, 6:32 PMNot necessarily. Both steel pipe and concrete pipe can be joined for some non-pressure uses (drain lines, for instance) with a band which is drawn tight around the pipe. There is a specific terminology for this, but I have forgotten it, if I ever knew it to begin with. SGLSchuyler;Trade name for those connections is a fernco. Kind of an oversized radiatior hose clamp with a rubber gasket between the clamp and the pipes being joined.Steve StullWinslow 7076




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Jack Burgess wrote:
When I started working in a municipal engineering department in the mid-1960s, vitrified clay pipe (VCP) was used for sanitary sewers and probably had been for decades since it is resistant to acids and sewage . . . VCP has a bell on one end with a rubber gasket but I wonder if it was ever shipped by rail.
There exist photos, I think at CSRM, of this pipe loaded in box cars.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

Jack Burgess
 

In discussing pipe types and modeling them, we need to keep a couple of
things in mind. First, which types of pipe were not manufactured locally and
thus might be shipped by rail? Iron pipe might be one type but concrete and
clay pipe might not. Second, we need to remember that we are talking about
pipe types from 60 years ago, not what is currently being used.

When I started working in a municipal engineering department in the
mid-1960s, vitrified clay pipe (VCP) was used for sanitary sewers and
probably had been for decades since it is resistant to acids and sewage. Now
days, in our area, VCP has been replaced for new installations by plastic
pipe since it is faster to install. VCP has a bell on one end with a rubber
gasket but I wonder if it was ever shipped by rail. If so, it is generally
in smaller diameters (12" is a very big sanitary sewer with 8" more typical)
and is red in color since it is made from clay. Interestingly, the Yosemite
Valley Railroad (built in 1906) had a lot of VCP storm water culverts, some
of which are still in place (but out of service <g>). These latter pipes
would have diameters from 12" to 24".

Storm water pipes are typically reinforced concrete pipe (RCP) but I'm not
sure how long RCP has been available...probably a long time. Again, I'm not
sure if it was shipped by rail. This pipe is still used and is joined via
"T&G" joints (meaning that there was no bell and one end has a female joint
with a reduced diameter on the outside of the joint area and the other end a
male joint) rather than a bell joint since leakage isn't a serious problem.
As the pipe is laid, these joints are mortared to minimize leakage. These
pipes are heavy and thus not that long. Larger diameter pipes are shorter
than smaller diameter pipes.

When I started working, water lines were laid in our area with
asbestos-cement pipe (ACP) but plastic is now used for obvious reasons. As I
recall, ACP is joined with via a "T&G" joint supplemented with a rubber
gasket. ACP was popular in areas where metallic pipes were subject to
external corrosion such as our Bay Area with salt water intrusion. Use of AC
pipe ceased due to health concerns associated with the mining, installation,
removal, and disposal of asbestos products. I guess that, due to the
location of asbestos mines vs. manufacturing plants, ACP might be shipped
via rail. ACP is typically smaller, 6-12" in diameter and white in color
with an asbestos texture. But ACP would have been widely used in the era
that we are modeling.

Natural gas lines in our area have been long been steel which is
field-welded together; there is no bell on these pipes since they were
welded together. Long distance transmission lines may be 30" or more in
diameter. There is no question that this pipe was transported by rail. We
also have a gasoline transmission line through our city which is also steel
(8" in diameter). It was originally used to transport jet fuel from a Shell
refinery to the San Jose Airport but was later used by transport gases used
in the high-tech industry but that was built outside our era.

In California, long-distance transportation of water is typical all over the
state. The early lines, such as the line from near Yosemite to serve San
Francisco, was riveted steel (60" and 76" in diameter) and without rereading
Ted Wurm's book on this construction project and its railroad, I'm not sure
that it was transported by rail but I can imagine that it was.

Ductile iron pipe is rarely used in our area due to salt intrusion below
grade. But it is extremely strong and has its advantages. It would have been
logically shipped via rail. This pipe has uses a bell joint.

One pipe type that hasn't been mentioned is galvanized corrugated metal pipe
(CMP) which is still used for storm water culverts. Because of the
specialized manufacturing processes required, these might have been shipped
by rail. Culverts range from 12" in diameter to 48" or more. Again, because
they are used for storm drain systems and water leakage isn't a problem, the
sections are joined with a collar as I recall.

In general, water line joints need to be pressure-proof and thus must have
strong joints requiring both a physical connection and a gasket. Sanitary
sewers also must not leak but aren't under pressure and bell joints work
okay. Storm drain systems don't need to be completely leak proof.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I've heard that term, yes. But it doesn't ring right on my ear, so I think there is probably
another term. "Pressure fitting?" "Pressure connector?" Something like that.

SGL

Are you thinking of a saddle clamp? These are primarily used to repair
breaks without removing the line.

Rich Orr

In a message dated 12/1/2008 9:33:25 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
schuyler.larrabee@verizon.net <mailto:schuyler.larrabee%40verizon.net> writes:

Not necessarily. Both steel pipe and concrete pipe can be joined for some
non-pressure uses (drain
lines, for instance) with a band which is drawn tight around the pipe.
There is a specific
terminology for this, but I have forgotten it, if I ever knew it to begin
with.

SGL

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of
ed_mines
Sent: Monday, December 01, 2008 1:30 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
,
"Mark
Mathu" <mark@...> wrote:
It is described as "steel pipe," and I agree that the walls are way
too thick for steel or iron pipe. And the pipes are too long to
represent precast concrete pipe.

The wall thickness of precast concrete pipe varies with the load it
is specified for, but as a general rule the wall thickness (in
inches) is about one greater than the pipe diameter (in feet). So a
2-foot diameter concrete pipe would have a 3" wall thickness, and a
6-foot diameter concrete pipe would have a 7" wall thickness.
Concrete pipes are usually 8 or 12 feet long.

Steel or iron pipe would have wall thickness measured in the
fractions of an inch. Lengths would vary from 20 feet (cast iron
pipe) up to 60 feet (steel pipe).
Don't most of these construction pipes have a bell on one end?

Ed
------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links

**************Life should be easier. So should your homepage. Try the NEW
AOL.com.
(http://www.aol.com/?optin=new-dp&;icid=aolcom40vanity&ncid=emlcntaolcom00000002
<http://www.aol.com/?optin=new-dp&;icid=aolcom40vanity&ncid=emlcntaolcom00000002> )






Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Not necessarily. Both steel pipe and concrete pipe can be joined for some non-pressure uses (drain
lines, for instance) with a band which is drawn tight around the pipe. There is a specific
terminology for this, but I have forgotten it, if I ever knew it to begin with.

SGL

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of ed_mines
Sent: Monday, December 01, 2008 1:30 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "Mark Mathu" <mark@...> wrote:
It is described as "steel pipe," and I agree that the walls are way
too thick for steel or iron pipe. And the pipes are too long to
represent precast concrete pipe.

The wall thickness of precast concrete pipe varies with the load it
is specified for, but as a general rule the wall thickness (in
inches) is about one greater than the pipe diameter (in feet). So a
2-foot diameter concrete pipe would have a 3" wall thickness, and a
6-foot diameter concrete pipe would have a 7" wall thickness.
Concrete pipes are usually 8 or 12 feet long.

Steel or iron pipe would have wall thickness measured in the
fractions of an inch. Lengths would vary from 20 feet (cast iron
pipe) up to 60 feet (steel pipe).
Don't most of these construction pipes have a bell on one end?

Ed


Change of e-mail address

centga@...
 

I'm in the process of changing my email over to Comcast. If you would like me to add you as a contact please reply to? toddchorton@comcast.net?? Thanks for your time


test - please ignore

centga@...
 


Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

SUVCWORR@...
 

Are you thinking of a saddle clamp? These are primarily used to repair
breaks without removing the line.

Rich Orr

In a message dated 12/1/2008 9:33:25 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
schuyler.larrabee@verizon.net writes:

Not necessarily. Both steel pipe and concrete pipe can be joined for some
non-pressure uses (drain
lines, for instance) with a band which is drawn tight around the pipe.
There is a specific
terminology for this, but I have forgotten it, if I ever knew it to begin
with.

SGL

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
ed_mines
Sent: Monday, December 01, 2008 1:30 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "Mark
Mathu" <mark@...> wrote:
It is described as "steel pipe," and I agree that the walls are way
too thick for steel or iron pipe. And the pipes are too long to
represent precast concrete pipe.

The wall thickness of precast concrete pipe varies with the load it
is specified for, but as a general rule the wall thickness (in
inches) is about one greater than the pipe diameter (in feet). So a
2-foot diameter concrete pipe would have a 3" wall thickness, and a
6-foot diameter concrete pipe would have a 7" wall thickness.
Concrete pipes are usually 8 or 12 feet long.

Steel or iron pipe would have wall thickness measured in the
fractions of an inch. Lengths would vary from 20 feet (cast iron
pipe) up to 60 feet (steel pipe).
Don't most of these construction pipes have a bell on one end?

Ed

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links







**************Life should be easier. So should your homepage. Try the NEW
AOL.com.
(http://www.aol.com/?optin=new-dp&;icid=aolcom40vanity&ncid=emlcntaolcom00000002)


Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Mathu" <mark@...> wrote:
It is described as "steel pipe," and I agree that the walls are way
too thick for steel or iron pipe. And the pipes are too long to
represent precast concrete pipe.

The wall thickness of precast concrete pipe varies with the load it
is specified for, but as a general rule the wall thickness (in
inches) is about one greater than the pipe diameter (in feet). So a
2-foot diameter concrete pipe would have a 3" wall thickness, and a
6-foot diameter concrete pipe would have a 7" wall thickness.
Concrete pipes are usually 8 or 12 feet long.

Steel or iron pipe would have wall thickness measured in the
fractions of an inch. Lengths would vary from 20 feet (cast iron
pipe) up to 60 feet (steel pipe).

Don't most of these construction pipes have a bell on one end?

Ed


Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

Mark Mathu
 

Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

The pipe load from Life-Like (on sale at Walthers) looks too
thick-walled for my tastes (and a little too "plastic-ey").
The Walthers pipe load should look thick as it is supposed to
be concrete pipe. The side wall thickness should be around 6"
SIX inches? How large a diameter is it? Most concrete pipe
I've seen at the size of say 30" diameter, is around 2-2.5"
wall.
Is this the pipe load we are discussing?
Life-Like Products - SceneMaster Flat Car Loads
http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/433-1510

It is described as "steel pipe," and I agree that the walls are way
too thick for steel or iron pipe. And the pipes are too long to
represent precast concrete pipe.

The wall thickness of precast concrete pipe varies with the load it
is specified for, but as a general rule the wall thickness (in
inches) is about one greater than the pipe diameter (in feet). So a
2-foot diameter concrete pipe would have a 3" wall thickness, and a
6-foot diameter concrete pipe would have a 7" wall thickness.
Concrete pipes are usually 8 or 12 feet long.

Steel or iron pipe would have wall thickness measured in the
fractions of an inch. Lengths would vary from 20 feet (cast iron
pipe) up to 60 feet (steel pipe).

____
Mark Mathu
Whitefish Bay, Wis.
civil engineer


Re: Philadelphia Quartz Type 21 tank car

John Hile <john66h@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Allen Cain" <allencain@...> wrote:

I have always assumed that these cars would have serviced glass making
industries but I am curious as to what other industries these might have
serviced in the early 1950s.










Allen,

Here is a link to a PQ Corp web page with a company history. It
touches on the products manufactured by Philadelphia Quartz...now
known as PQ Corporation.

http://www.pqcorp.com/corporate/PQHistory.asp


Hope this is helpful,

John Hile
Blacksburg, VA


New files in the Files area

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I just uploaded to NYC tables, showing Storage Charges on LCL freight, and a chart to assist in
figuring out how many days had elapsed. These tables are from 1939. The are on the obverse and
reverse of a single heavy card sheet.

These may be of limited interest, but I felt they should be shared

SGL
La vita e breve, mangiate prima il dolce!


ARR Car Selection Rules

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Hi

I just uploaded a copy of a document about how yardmasters should make car selections with respect
to what district the car's home road is in.

I am sometimes graced with a short sojourn with materials destined for the ELHS Archives. The
latest is a screw-bound series of the memoranda from upper level management about how yardmasters
were to conduct their recording and reporting of the location of car This poster was included in
this last volume. I thought this would add some certainty to the endless debating about how cars
were >supposed to be< selected by the YM to send for loadings

SGL
La vita e breve, mangiate prima il dolce!

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