Date   

Re: Photo: CN Livestock Car 815029

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

This sucker looks like it was a double decker for beef critters rather than sheep or hogs.

Just my thought from it's height, Don Valentine


Re: SAL, ex-GF&A ARA XM-1 Box Cars

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

 
Re: SAL, ex-GF&A ARA XM-1 Box Cars
From: Tom Madden
Date: Wed, 04 Mar 2020 14:29:45 PST

On Wed, Mar 4, 2020 at 03:05 PM, Dennis Storzek wrote:

Buy all you want. We can still make 'em faster than you can buy 'em! :-)

Another advantage of injection molding over resin casting. 


Tom Madden


The ONLY advantage of injection molding over resin casting.

Don Valentine



Re: dating kit contents

Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Mar 4, 2020 at 03:31 PM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:
Don’t tell me you can’t do it.  Or that you don’t know..  The information is right on the decoration: “BLT 1946” or whatever.  IIRC, Branchline did this and it guided my purchases.  And it’s one reason I have few Kadee PS1.  All too late for me.
We do that too... our web site listing for the car that started this discussion says, "built 1925."

Dennis Storzek


Re: "Dedicated" freight car service

Charles Peck
 

GE's Appliance Park in Louisville KY got a dedicated group of high-cube cars, not all from just one road.  Park opened in 1951.
Chuck Peck


On Wed, Mar 4, 2020 at 6:42 PM np328 <jcdworkingonthenp@...> wrote:
     For the railroads I have studied and read up in company files, I'll make a generalization that: specialized cars are most likely to be found in dedicated service. 

The rational is that these costs of the (then) new designs had to be justified by a dependable ROI.

    When the NP ordered new 50' cars in the late 1920's, these new 6000 series were to be dedicated to auto service. The studies done by them indicated that shipments of autos at that time were most dependent on what empty cars were available in the local Detroit area yards, and who let cars sit around idle local to the auto plants waiting for the call. They wanted these cars yesterday if not sooner, so they bought 1000 of these based largely on an existing AT&StF design that a car builder was building and had the assy. jigs already in place.  As autos grew in length, the Evans loaders needed to be changed more or less yearly with each new auto development. Eventually for lack of several inches (3 - 4 inches) of interior roof height, the cars were no longer viable as auto carriers and were released into general service.  

      Later came covered hoppers, at a time when these were still uncommon on railroads, the NP bought a handful - for one shipper per the request of the sales dept. Then later bought the next handful for another shipper, again per the sales dept.  Both of these sets and many later purchases of covered hoppers went directly into dedicated service.  The SP&S and GN were the same early on in the development of covered hoppers from the exchange of letters found in corporate files. The Q had a bigger heavy industry market (the Chicago area) than the others and so was on an earlier timeline.

   More NP examples (covered gons) exist however they are beyond this lists 1960 end date. 

     And I will state that if it was a dedicated service car, accounting had already crunched the numbers on the sales department request for said cars to be dedicated. An AFE or reading the railroads Board of Directors budget request for the prior year that cars were ordered for Oliver Farm Equipment or others should shed light on things. 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Jim Dick - St. Paul, MN

 

    


Re: "Dedicated" freight car service

np328
 

     For the railroads I have studied and read up in company files, I'll make a generalization that: specialized cars are most likely to be found in dedicated service. 

The rational is that these costs of the (then) new designs had to be justified by a dependable ROI.

    When the NP ordered new 50' cars in the late 1920's, these new 6000 series were to be dedicated to auto service. The studies done by them indicated that shipments of autos at that time were most dependent on what empty cars were available in the local Detroit area yards, and who let cars sit around idle local to the auto plants waiting for the call. They wanted these cars yesterday if not sooner, so they bought 1000 of these based largely on an existing AT&StF design that a car builder was building and had the assy. jigs already in place.  As autos grew in length, the Evans loaders needed to be changed more or less yearly with each new auto development. Eventually for lack of several inches (3 - 4 inches) of interior roof height, the cars were no longer viable as auto carriers and were released into general service.  

      Later came covered hoppers, at a time when these were still uncommon on railroads, the NP bought a handful - for one shipper per the request of the sales dept. Then later bought the next handful for another shipper, again per the sales dept.  Both of these sets and many later purchases of covered hoppers went directly into dedicated service.  The SP&S and GN were the same early on in the development of covered hoppers from the exchange of letters found in corporate files. The Q had a bigger heavy industry market (the Chicago area) than the others and so was on an earlier timeline.

   More NP examples (covered gons) exist however they are beyond this lists 1960 end date. 

     And I will state that if it was a dedicated service car, accounting had already crunched the numbers on the sales department request for said cars to be dedicated. An AFE or reading the railroads Board of Directors budget request for the prior year that cars were ordered for Oliver Farm Equipment or others should shed light on things. 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Jim Dick - St. Paul, MN

 

    


dating kit contents

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Paul Woods suggests

 

It would be handy if manufacturers put a little unicorn symbol on their advertising beside the foobie paint jobs i.e. 'This one belongs in a fairy tale'.

 

I agree with that, but I’d also appreciate some effort to be made to provide what amounts to a time stamp.  Easy enough to put it in the stamp that marks the end of the box.  I’m not going to provide an example but it’d be simple enough to add “1954” or “1946” to indicate that the car inside first appeared painted this way in that year.

 

Don’t tell me you can’t do it.  Or that you don’t know..  The information is right on the decoration: “BLT 1946” or whatever.  IIRC, Branchline did this and it guided my purchases.  And it’s one reason I have few Kadee PS1.  All too late for me.

 

Schuyler

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Paul Woods
Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2020 6:12 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] SAL, ex-GF&A ARA XM-1 Box Cars

 

On Wed, Mar 4, 2020 at 02:29 PM, Tom Madden wrote:

Another advantage of injection molding over resin casting. 


Tom Madden

[Speaking mostly tongue-in-cheek]: A significant disadvantage of injection moulding is, having plowed huge $$$ into an injection-moulding die, it becomes very difficult for a manufacturer to resist putting Foobie paint jobs on models to increase their return.  I completely understand the need for this, and many purchasers don't mind anyway, but I have to say it really stings when I spend good money on what I think is an accurate model (not in HO, by the way, I model in O), only to find it never existed.  It would be handy if manufacturers put a little unicorn symbol on their advertising beside the foobie paint jobs i.e. 'This one belongs in a fairy tale'.

Actually, come to think of it, advertising for the schemes that could be called 90%-100% accurate probably should include a picture of that classic child's equine ride-on nursery toy with a little brown pile behind it, because they seem to be rarer than rocking horse poo!

Paul Woods

 


Re: SAL, ex-GF&A ARA XM-1 Box Cars

Paul Woods <paul@...>
 

On Wed, Mar 4, 2020 at 02:29 PM, Tom Madden wrote:

Another advantage of injection molding over resin casting. 


Tom Madden

[Speaking mostly tongue-in-cheek]: A significant disadvantage of injection moulding is, having plowed huge $$$ into an injection-moulding die, it becomes very difficult for a manufacturer to resist putting Foobie paint jobs on models to increase their return.  I completely understand the need for this, and many purchasers don't mind anyway, but I have to say it really stings when I spend good money on what I think is an accurate model (not in HO, by the way, I model in O), only to find it never existed.  It would be handy if manufacturers put a little unicorn symbol on their advertising beside the foobie paint jobs i.e. 'This one belongs in a fairy tale'.

Actually, come to think of it, advertising for the schemes that could be called 90%-100% accurate probably should include a picture of that classic child's equine ride-on nursery toy with a little brown pile behind it, because they seem to be rarer than rocking horse poo!

Paul Woods

 


Re: Central of Georgia Boxcar Series Help

Todd Horton
 

The Central started using “ The Right Way” lettering in 1954 on freight cars. The 50’ black and silver “blimp” cars were the first to have this.  The slogan was used earlier on some diesel locomotives and cabooses before this date.      Todd Horton 


On Mar 4, 2020, at 5:03 PM, Allen Cain <Allencaintn@...> wrote:


Thanks Tim for the excellent photo.

Can anyone tell me when CG first used "The Right Way" slogan on their boxcars?

And a special thanks to Ed Hawkins who has furnished more information than this old head can assimilate!

Allen Cain


Re: SAL, ex-GF&A ARA XM-1 Box Cars

Tom Madden
 

On Wed, Mar 4, 2020 at 03:05 PM, Dennis Storzek wrote:
Buy all you want. We can still make 'em faster than you can buy 'em! :-)

Another advantage of injection molding over resin casting. 


Tom Madden


Re: Central of Georgia Boxcar Series Help

O Fenton Wells
 

I thought it was 1952 but not sure about that, should check with C of G HS. They would certainly know 
Fenton 


On Mar 4, 2020, at 5:03 PM, Allen Cain <allencaintn@...> wrote:


Thanks Tim for the excellent photo.

Can anyone tell me when CG first used "The Right Way" slogan on their boxcars?

And a special thanks to Ed Hawkins who has furnished more information than this old head can assimilate!

Allen Cain


Re: SAL, ex-GF&A ARA XM-1 Box Cars

Dennis Storzek
 

Buy all you want. We can still make 'em faster than you can buy 'em! :-)

Dennis Storzek


Re: Central of Georgia Boxcar Series Help

Allen Cain
 

Thanks Tim for the excellent photo.

Can anyone tell me when CG first used "The Right Way" slogan on their boxcars?

And a special thanks to Ed Hawkins who has furnished more information than this old head can assimilate!

Allen Cain


Re: SAL, ex-GF&A ARA XM-1 Box Cars

Bill Welch
 
Edited

Hi Scott, looks like Ben is going to buy a kit for you to harvest the roof, what a guy!

Bill Welch


Re: "Dedicated" freight car service

Richard Wilkens
 

As to the Spokane, Portland & Seattle Railway, they had bulkhead flat cars in dedicated service for plaster board to Kaiser Gypsum as well as most of their wood chip gondola cars were in dedicated service with the largest customer being Crown Zellerbach Paper. I have seen photos of some cars with "Return to..." stenciling.

Rich Wilkens


Re: SAL, ex-GF&A ARA XM-1 Box Cars

Benjamin Hom
 

Bill Welch wrote:
"Scott I would suggest purchasing an Undec Accurail 8-panel SS box car with composite ends and cut their beautiful Hutchins roof off."

Better yet, buy one of the foobies and cut the roof off.  You'll get the roof, plus get that model off the streets.  Here's a prime candidate:
http://www.accurail.com/accurail/art/4500/4501.jpg

;)

Ben Hom


Re: Duryea Underframes (Was: Coupler Distance . . . )

Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Mar 4, 2020 at 09:52 AM, Randy Hees wrote:
I also note that the FRA bans freight cars (including cabooses) over 50 years of age... 
Randy,

That ban didn't take effect until far in our future, sometime right around the publication date of that book.There were no blanket age related bans during the steam ream and for that matter, waivers were available for specific pieces of equipment under the ban you cite.

Dennis Storzek


Re: SAL, ex-GF&A ARA XM-1 Box Cars

Bill Welch
 
Edited

On Wed, Mar 4, 2020 at 06:16 AM, Scott H. Haycock wrote:

My main concern at this time however, is the roof. I need to replace the model's roof with a Hutchin's roof.  I could really use a good photo or better yet a drawing of this roof. 
Thanks for any help,
Scott Haycock 
Scott I would suggest purchasing an Undec Accrual 8-panel SS box car with composite ends and cut their beautiful Hutchins roof off. The advantage of that body is there a flange that helps to guide a saw blade. You may need to widen the roof but any filler will be hidden but the Running Board. I have done this 3-4 times and never regretted it.

Bill Welch


"Dedicated" freight car service

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Folks;

 

The more I dig into the PRR box car fleet, the more I see of cars in dedicated service, and not just auto and auto parts service.  These other cars do not always show up in ORERs (which still have a LOT), but in photo collections like the Hagley Museum.

 

PRR was in the habit of photographing cars when they were changed or re-fitted for a new service.  Like this one:

 

https://digital.hagley.org/PRR_12085?solr_nav%5Bid%5D=781f99ec63aeaca1d03e&solr_nav%5Bpage%5D=0&solr_nav%5Boffset%5D=6

 

For those with a lot of knowledge on particular roads, do you know if a lot of this was going on within their fleets?  What types of service were they dedicated to?  Was there evidence of this on the exterior of the car?  “When empty send to….” Stencils?  Which roads was this most in evidence?

 

The more I think I know, the less I do.

 

Thanks!

 

Elden Gatwood


Re: Photo: CN Livestock Car 815029

Ian Cranstone
 

On Mar 4, 2020, at 12:24 PM, Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io wrote:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/28555987@N06/16514676841/in/album-72157678690227526/

I trust this car's origins are before the cutoff date for this group. Looking at the car's end, I wonder if this car was rebuilt from a boxcar?


Sure was… specifically from CN 508017 in 1967 — this car was originally built by Canadian Car & Foundry in April 1930, and was an example of a CNR 1929 standard boxcar.  As built, these were relatively low-roofed cars, and you can see more-or-less where the original roof line was.

Ian CranstoneOsgoode, Ontario, Canada


Re: Duryea Underframes (Was: Coupler Distance . . . )

Randy Hees
 

Per AAR interchange rules (my copy is 1975) per rule 90 (cars banned for interchange) under sub-section 3a, " all freight cars 46 years or older from date built or rebuilt... (at the time 1929) and sub-section 3b "Cars built prior to April 1,1950 equipped with Duryea underframe"   

I also note that the FRA bans freight cars (including cabooses) over 50 years of age... 

Randy Hees

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