Date   

Re: Cudahy meat reefers

Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Schuyler,

The quote is exactly as it is on the page. I assumed "No." meant "north". It seem obvious to me, so I didn't comment.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Schuyler Larrabee wrote:


-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC Garth G. Groff

Cudahy Packing Co. is listed as "No. Salt Lake (Not in S.L. Switching
Yard Limit)".
Garth, unless you typo'd a period instead of a t, I'm suggesting here that "No." means North, as in
North Salt Lake. Or does that not make sense?

SGL




Re: The SHAKE N TAKE clinic is a full house

jerryglow2
 

The Sunshine Region Western Division recently had a hands on clinic
building a Bar Mills (entry level) laser cut kit that was a success.
Not necessarily a STMFC topic but just to show it can be done.
Although the original plans were to get them at a discounted package
price, Bar Mills wound up comping the kits

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, tgregmrtn <tgregmrtn@...> wrote:

Group,

Shake N Take has been a success in Cocoa Beach and now kind of a
focus for the event. So to try to duplicate it at another events would
require me retiring and lots of travel. Neither of which is going to
happen anytime soon.

Greg Martin


Re: Box car floor boards (was running boards...painted or not?)

Ed Hawkins
 

On Dec 8, 2008, at 3:03 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:

Denny

I hesitate to make any generalizations or assumptions about
paint anymore. Without a complete specification from a builder
or owner, I think it's all guess work. Looking at some photos
of overturned cars, I've seen a few painted underbodies, but
most are so dirty you can't tell. Of course, I have seen one
or two photos showing completely unpainted floor boards too.

The neatest photo is an overturned Santa Fe box car -- most
of the floor boards are black with filth, but some are clean.
Obviously a floor repair! This would be a challenge to model
well, and then you have the problem that no one would ever
know...
Tim O'Connor
Tim,
Out of curiosity I pulled out a random Pullman-Standard bill of
material for a series of box cars to see what it specified for interior
decking and running boards. This happens to apply to two P-S lot
numbers 5537 and 5549, 1937 AAR box cars built in 1936 for Southern
Pacific, series 32770-33269 and 37840-38089, respectively.

On a per car basis, decking was comprised of 96 boards made of Douglas
Fir, Vertical Grain, Close Grain, Free from Heart, and Edges Clear of
Knots. Of the total, 94 were Tongue & Groove 1-3/4" x 5-1/16" x 9'-8
1/4". The other two were 2-1/16" x 5-1/2" x 9'-8 1/4" with one board
being tongue only and the other being groove only. Layout to conform to
P-S drawing 512-C-51.

Running boards were also Vertical Grain Douglas Fir (9 boards for the
longitudinals and 14 for the latitudinals. All boards were 1-1/8" x
5-3/4". The lengths of the longitudinals varied with 3 being 17'-1", 3
being 14'-3 1/2", and 3 being 10'-10 1/2". The latitudinals were all
2'-1" long.

There is nothing in the lumber section that says anything about any
type of wood coatings or preservatives.

Quoting from the section entitled Painting.

Application: All paint colors must be furnished by the car builder and
must conform to the shade with sample colors shown in specification
CS-22. All paints must conform with specification CS-22. All paints
must be applied in perfectly even coats to both wood and metal
surfaces. Paint must not be applied in temperature below 40 degrees
Fahrenheit. Paint may be applied either by brushed or by spraying, if
done in a workmanlike manner. Inspectors must see that paints are not
thinned down beyond their specified consistencies to permit of more
rapid application. The use of benzine or other inferior cutting
agencies will not be permitted.

Trucks: All parts of trucks, except wheels and axles must receive two
coats of metallic paint No. 11 to be of the same consistency as the two
coats of metallic paint for car body and be stenciled in white lead in
accordance with drawings showing "Lettering" with initials of road and
number on side of each truck which faces toward the end of car.

Underframe and Body: Underframe and body must be thoroughly cleaned and
free from rust and grease before painting is begun. All joints where
metal laps on metal must be given a thick coating of No. 1 Continental
Car Cement or approved equivalent before being riveted up. This also
applies to wood parts which come in contact with metal. Body of car
(outside and inside metal surfaces including inside of roof) and
underframe must receive a priming coat of read lead in oil No. 19-A
with two coats of metallic paint No. 11 on outside of body and
underframe, and one coat of metallic paint No. 11 on inside of metal
surfaces (including inside of roof) reduced as shown below. Apply a
good priming coat of red lead in oil No. 19-A to both inside and
outside of metal surfaces of body including inside of roof and to
underframe. This coat must be thoroughly well brushed in or sprayed on
and then thoroughly well brushed in after spraying. Allow twelve hours
for drying. Paint for the second outside coat shall be reduced with 1/2
gallon of boiled linseed oil, 1/8 gallon of turpentine substitute, and
1/8 gallon Japan dryer to one gallon of No. 11. Allow twelve hours for
drying. Paint for the third outside coat shall be reduced with one
gallon of boiled linseed oil, 1/8 gallon of turpentine substitute and
1/8 gallon of Japan dryer to one gallon of No. 11. Allow twelve hours
for drying. Paint for the second inside coat, which is applied to all
inside metal surfaces including inside of roof, should be metallic
paint No. 11 and of the same consistency as the first outside body
coat. This coat should be applied before the lining and nailing strips
are installed in the car. Allow twelve hours for drying.

Stenciling, Lettering and Numbering: All stenciling on outside of car
must be done with white lead in oil, No. 12, in such a manner that all
letters and figures are perfectly white. Location of all stenciling
must be in accordance with drawing showing "Lettering" and letters and
figures must be in strict accordance with those shown on the drawing.

Roof: Outside of roof must receive one coat of No. 1 Continental Car
Cement or approved equivalent, sprayed on evenly to at least 1/32" in
thickness, and as prescribed by the cement manufacturer. This coat
should be applied before outside body receives the two coats of
metallic paint No. 11 and before the running boards are applied. The
outside surface of roof must be washed with clear water to remove
grease and dirt. If galvanized steel roof is applied, the galvanized
surfaces after being washed must be coated with a solution of Oxalic
Acid in proportion of 1/2 pint acid to one gallon of water: allow to
dry and dust off.

Running Boards: Running boards must be given one coat of metallic paint
No. 11 when third body coat is applied and of same consistency.

While this is just one example, I hope it helps shed some light on box
car painting practices. Note that while the running boards received a
single coat of metallic No. 11 paint, it was a coat that had been
substantially thinned. Regarding the bottom of the floor boards, my
interpretation is that they weren't specified to be painted, but they
may well have received some overspray of red lead primer and metallic
No. 11 paint.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: Box car running boards...painted or not?

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Douglas Harding" <dharding@...> wrote:

A little off topic, but the "True Inspirationalists" of Amana Colony
fame in Iowa (and no they are not Amish) left their barns and
other out buildings unpainted. They found the wood lasted just as
long whether it was painted or not. Painting buildings was
determined to be a waste of time and money, so it was not done by
the colony.

Could it be railroads determined the same with freight car floors?

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org

Someplace I was reading (and no, I'm not searching for the citation,
you'll have to trust me on this) That the barracks the Army
constructed during WWI were not intended to be painted, but a paint
manufacturer's association petitioned the Sec't of the Army, or
Congress, or somebody, claiming that the drab weather-beaten buildings
would be bad for morale (and no doubt paint sales, also.)

You have to remember that the inferior lumber we are seeing today
would never have been cut fifty years ago, and conversely the quality
weather resistant species are now all but unavailable, and what is
tends to be soft fast growth. Northern White Pine is extinct as a
commercial species, as is old growth Douglas Fir, and someone just
told us that the Army found imported Mahogany to be cheaper than
domestic White Oak.

I replaced an exterior door sill with a piece of dense White Oak
heartwood about fifteen years ago, and never bothered to paint, stain,
or varnish it, instead relying on that species natural rot resistance
to do the job. It's now weathered to a nice silver gray, but is still
perfectly sound; it may well outlast me. This in contrast to the
Ponderosa Pine scraps I cut into tomato stakes, which rotted away in a
year.

Truck trailers were traditionally decked with White Oak, and I don't
ever recall seeing an enclosed van trailer with the deck painted,
either inside or underneath. I would suspect that some railroads
specified that car flooring be painted, while others didn't. When
replacement time came, those cars done at outdoor RIP tracks were
unpainted, especially if the work was done during the winter, while
conversely cars repainted at shops using spray equipment had the
underside of the floor painted whether intended or not. However, any
car I've seen in service (as opposed to MoW) has had such a complete
coating of crud that one couldn't tell anyway.

If running boards were painted, they likely lost the paint on their
upper surfaces from the paint failing and weathering away long before
the wood itself deteriorated to the point that replacement was necessary.

Dennis


Re: Southern War Emergency Gon

Gary Herron <osda047@...>
 

Mike,

Sorry, I don't have roster information on these cars, but there was
an article in January 92 of Mainline Modeler about these cars. I think
there may have been some roster info in the article. I have no idea
where my copy is or I could give you a better description.

Just a place to start...
Gary Herron - Omaha, NE

 


Re: Cudahy meat reefers

Douglas Harding <dharding@...>
 

Garth, PHP is railroad talk for "Packing House Products" and could mean anything coming out of a packing house, which we more
commonly think of as a slaughter house. The "packing" term comes from early meat processors packing their products in barrels for
shipment. And the "Uncle Sam" moniker came from an early meat packer (1818 I think) who stamped barrels of meat destined for the
army "US".

PHP could be hanging meat carcasses, cans of lard or hams. It could be bacon or boxed meat. It possibly even refers to the various
by-products as well.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: Box car running boards...painted or not?

Douglas Harding <dharding@...>
 

A little off topic, but the "True Inspirationalists" of Amana Colony fame in Iowa (and no they are not Amish) left their barns and
other out buildings unpainted. They found the wood lasted just as long whether it was painted or not. Painting buildings was
determined to be a waste of time and money, so it was not done by the colony.

Could it be railroads determined the same with freight car floors?

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: Items listed for sale

Rob Sarberenyi <espeef5@...>
 

Sorry, forgot to mention I also have available a nice scratchbuilt C&O
Thurmond, WV depot based on plans that appeared in the April 1987 issue of
Mainline Modeler

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=260328954523


Rob Sarberenyi
espeef5@pacbell.net


Items listed for sale

Rob Sarberenyi <espeef5@...>
 

I have a variety of items currently listed on eBay that may be of interest
(note: you can easily navigate items listed from the store category menu on
the left-hand side)

http://stores.ebay.com/Espee-F-5

Among the listings are:

- Kadee PS-1 box cars
- Middle Division, Microscale, and Thinfilm decal sets
- Westside and Precision Scale brass HO scale wood sheathed cabooses
- An out-of-print PRR Passenger Painting and Lettering book, very nice!
- MDC, P2k, IMRC and other steam era freight cars
- Various books covering steam era railroads

I'll post plenty more goodies over the next several days and weeks.

Thanks for looking!


Rob Sarberenyi
espeef5@pacbell.net


Re: Reciprocal switching - and the lack of it.

Greg Martin
 

Tim,

It depends on the switching district agreements. It is very possible that this was the case.

Greg Martin

In a message dated 12/08/08 18:18:30 Pacific Standard Time, timboconnor@comcast.net writes:

Yes, and therefore by definition, this violates the definition
of reciprocal switching as we have been talking about. It sounds
to me like Erie received trackage rights, and gave trackage
rights in turn.

And I don't know you well enough for sarcasm.

Tim

At 12/8/2008 08:51 PM Monday, you wrote:
Tim, I know it was a long email for your attention span, but that IS what the last line says . . .

SGL

(just so nobody gets twisty about this, Tim and I know each other . . .)


So in your example Schuyler, Erie was able to physically switch
Moon Milling in return for trackage rights given to the D&H?

Tim O'

Gene Green innocently asked:

What is meant by the term "reciprocal switching?"
a lack of reciprocal switching could be a powerful thing: In Binghamton NY, my
hometown, there was a company called Moon Milling. This has been shown in many photographs
through
the years, because Moon is one of a series of buildings which make great backdrops for model
railroad layouts.

The situation was this: Moon Milling was across the ERIE mainline tracks from the ERIE's
Binghamton
station. But, the D&H's last few rods of track joined the ERIE main at just about that point.
This
meant that the D&H had the switching rights to Moon, not the ERIE. This wouldn't have been much
of
an issue if the D&H was the shipper of choice for Moon, and/or if most of Moon's inbound traffic
came from the D&H. The best information I have says that for both cases it was the ERIE. So, here
we have a situation where the cars to Moon would arrive on the ERIE, but have to be interchanged
to
the D&H, which would then spot the car. The straight-line distance from the station building to
the
finally-delivered car is probably >100', maybe less than 80'.

Moon noticed that sometimes their cars would arrive on the ERIE, and be interchanged to the D&H,
and
then spotted at their unloading spot, and it would take two days to get that done. This was an
annoying delay. In addition, there was an inequitable split of fees, because the D&H was the
terminating road, and got a good chunk of the billing, for handling the car maybe a quarter-mile
all
together.

So, the ERIE wanted to get rid of the D&H's division of the rate. Moon wanted their cars as soon
as
they could come in. But the D&H didn't >want< to give up their juicy share of money for so little
work. How to resolve this? Well, the D&H was interested in making a connection with the Lehigh
Valley; the nearest connection was at Owego, west of Binghamton, and at Owego the ERIE crossed
the
LV tracks. Eventually, the D&H was given trackage rights to Owego to connect with the LV, and the
ERIE got to switch Moon Milling.

SGL

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: The SHAKE N TAKE clinic is a full house

Greg Martin
 

Group,

Shake N Take has been a success in Cocoa Beach and now kind of a focus for the event. So to try to duplicate it at another events would require me retiring and lots of travel. Neither of which is going to happen anytime soon.

Greg Martin


Re: Cudahy meat reefers

Schuyler Larrabee
 

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC Garth G. Groff

Cudahy Packing Co. is listed as "No. Salt Lake (Not in S.L. Switching
Yard Limit)".
Garth, unless you typo'd a period instead of a t, I'm suggesting here that "No." means North, as in
North Salt Lake. Or does that not make sense?

SGL


Re: Reciprocal switching - and the lack of it.

Tim O'Connor
 

Yes, and therefore by definition, this violates the definition
of reciprocal switching as we have been talking about. It sounds
to me like Erie received trackage rights, and gave trackage
rights in turn.

And I don't know you well enough for sarcasm.

Tim

At 12/8/2008 08:51 PM Monday, you wrote:
Tim, I know it was a long email for your attention span, but that IS what the last line says . . .

SGL

(just so nobody gets twisty about this, Tim and I know each other . . .)


So in your example Schuyler, Erie was able to physically switch
Moon Milling in return for trackage rights given to the D&H?

Tim O'

Gene Green innocently asked:

What is meant by the term "reciprocal switching?"
a lack of reciprocal switching could be a powerful thing: In Binghamton NY, my
hometown, there was a company called Moon Milling. This has been shown in many photographs
through
the years, because Moon is one of a series of buildings which make great backdrops for model
railroad layouts.

The situation was this: Moon Milling was across the ERIE mainline tracks from the ERIE's
Binghamton
station. But, the D&H's last few rods of track joined the ERIE main at just about that point.
This
meant that the D&H had the switching rights to Moon, not the ERIE. This wouldn't have been much
of
an issue if the D&H was the shipper of choice for Moon, and/or if most of Moon's inbound traffic
came from the D&H. The best information I have says that for both cases it was the ERIE. So, here
we have a situation where the cars to Moon would arrive on the ERIE, but have to be interchanged
to
the D&H, which would then spot the car. The straight-line distance from the station building to
the
finally-delivered car is probably >100', maybe less than 80'.

Moon noticed that sometimes their cars would arrive on the ERIE, and be interchanged to the D&H,
and
then spotted at their unloading spot, and it would take two days to get that done. This was an
annoying delay. In addition, there was an inequitable split of fees, because the D&H was the
terminating road, and got a good chunk of the billing, for handling the car maybe a quarter-mile
all
together.

So, the ERIE wanted to get rid of the D&H's division of the rate. Moon wanted their cars as soon
as
they could come in. But the D&H didn't >want< to give up their juicy share of money for so little
work. How to resolve this? Well, the D&H was interested in making a connection with the Lehigh
Valley; the nearest connection was at Owego, west of Binghamton, and at Owego the ERIE crossed
the
LV tracks. Eventually, the D&H was given trackage rights to Owego to connect with the LV, and the
ERIE got to switch Moon Milling.

SGL

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: Carbody Window Screens

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

I took some clear styrene .005"-.010" sheet, and scratched the face
of it once in a straight line with 220- or 400-grit sandpaper. I
scratched it again at a right angle from the previous scratching.

Then I applied a thin wash of Tamiya (any model acrylic paint would
work) flat black paint, rubbing off the excess with a facial tissue.

The result is a very dirty looking HO-scale screen.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "lnnrr" <lnnrr@...> wrote:

-Bob, I can't recall who recommended it to me, but I've been
experimenting with a easily available material. Lipton teabags.
Not the regular paper, but their premium line which comes in
little mesh bags. I've used an india ink/alcohol wash to tint
it a little gray but it retains a bit of shine. OK for new
screen I guess. Haven't tried making it rusty yet.
Project isn't yet to the stage of dull coat and now I'm not sure
if I'll mask it off before risking it getting filled with dull coat.
If you try it, please let us know how you fare.
Regards,
Chuck Peck



-- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, chapbob@ wrote:

Does anyone have a favorite product to recommend for HO scale
window screens
as found on cabooses, camp cars, etc.?

What I'm looking for is a fine mesh, but not so fine as to
totally
hide the
window behind it.

Thanks!
Bob Chapman
**************Make your life easier with all your friends, email,
and
favorite sites in one place. Try it now.
(http://www.aol.com/?optin=new-
dp&icid=aolcom40vanity&ncid=emlcntaolcom00000010)


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Reciprocal bitching

Schuyler Larrabee
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "brianehni" <behni@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "Dennis Storzek" <destorzek@>
wrote:
Well, as they say, stuff happens, and we all
realize that everyone makes mistakes (most of us, anyway).

Dennis
I thought I made a mistake once, but I was wrong. 8^)

Brian Ehni
Just Couldn't Resist, TN
I had a professor in grad school who frequently said "The only people
who don't make mistakes are those who do nothing at all." His
follow-up to that was "Progress is making new mistakes, not repeating
the same old ones."

Time stopped in November 1941
Walter M. Clark
Pullman, Washington, USA
I make no mistakes. Sometimes, however, I achieve novel results.

SGL


Re: Reciprocal switching - and the lack of it.

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Tim, I know it was a long email for your attention span, but that IS what the last line says . . .

SGL

(just so nobody gets twisty about this, Tim and I know each other . . .)


So in your example Schuyler, Erie was able to physically switch
Moon Milling in return for trackage rights given to the D&H?

Tim O'

Gene Green innocently asked:

What is meant by the term "reciprocal switching?"
a lack of reciprocal switching could be a powerful thing: In Binghamton NY, my
hometown, there was a company called Moon Milling. This has been shown in many photographs
through
the years, because Moon is one of a series of buildings which make great backdrops for model
railroad layouts.

The situation was this: Moon Milling was across the ERIE mainline tracks from the ERIE's
Binghamton
station. But, the D&H's last few rods of track joined the ERIE main at just about that point.
This
meant that the D&H had the switching rights to Moon, not the ERIE. This wouldn't have been much
of
an issue if the D&H was the shipper of choice for Moon, and/or if most of Moon's inbound traffic
came from the D&H. The best information I have says that for both cases it was the ERIE. So, here
we have a situation where the cars to Moon would arrive on the ERIE, but have to be interchanged
to
the D&H, which would then spot the car. The straight-line distance from the station building to
the
finally-delivered car is probably >100', maybe less than 80'.

Moon noticed that sometimes their cars would arrive on the ERIE, and be interchanged to the D&H,
and
then spotted at their unloading spot, and it would take two days to get that done. This was an
annoying delay. In addition, there was an inequitable split of fees, because the D&H was the
terminating road, and got a good chunk of the billing, for handling the car maybe a quarter-mile
all
together.

So, the ERIE wanted to get rid of the D&H's division of the rate. Moon wanted their cars as soon
as
they could come in. But the D&H didn't >want< to give up their juicy share of money for so little
work. How to resolve this? Well, the D&H was interested in making a connection with the Lehigh
Valley; the nearest connection was at Owego, west of Binghamton, and at Owego the ERIE crossed
the
LV tracks. Eventually, the D&H was given trackage rights to Owego to connect with the LV, and the
ERIE got to switch Moon Milling.

SGL


Re: Delano color photo

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

ed_mines wrote:
Look at those reefers on the right side of the photo. Doesn't that round herald look like it's on a PFE car? The cars look yellow to me, not orange.
Given the age of the Delano images, it's not surprising that they often look somewhat faded or color shifted. But if you take the photo at face value, it only demonstrates the already known fact that PFE orange tended to fade and weather in the direction of yellowish-orange.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Reciprocal bitching

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Kurt Laughlin wrote:
A very good point there. Can you tell us how the definition in the UP circular differs from the earlier practice?
No, I was hoping someone on the list could do so. But an awful lot of railroading on the "rules and tariffs" side has changed greatly since 1960, so I thought I would mention that point.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: The SHAKE N TAKE clinic is a full house

Jim & Lisa Hayes <jimandlisa97225@...>
 

I didn't bother trying to sign up because I won't be there. Any chance of
doing a Shake N Take at Naperville?

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon








Guys,
The list is now complete for the online pre registration for the Shake N
Take clinic. We'll have a few?slots left for those registering at the door
with no Internet access. I have also added for slots for what Al Brown
suggests as "Instruction Only" which will give you access to a handout for
the modeling of the kit that I provide for the folks listed below. So let me
get this out to you all and know that if you would like to add yourself
under "Instruction Only".

Also let me correct the time for the clinic: Friday January 09, 2009 at 3:30

PM in the Seahorse & Starfish Roo.

Here's the current list"

1.) Armend Premo
2.) Dr. Denny Anspach
3.) Tony Thompson
4.) Mont Switzer
5.) Schuyler Larrabee
6.) John Greedy
7.) William Bell
8.) Jeff Alley
9.) Mike Brock (if we can get him to stand still for 5 minutes)
10.) Gary Laakso
11.) Roger Hinman
13.) Richard Hendrickson
14.) Paul Lyons
15.) Bruce Smith
16.) Brian Carlson
17.) Jerry Glow
18.) John G Wheeler
19.) Dick Berry
20.) Lindsay Raley
21.) John Golden
22.) Owne Thorne
23.) Chirs Zygmont
24.) Ted Cullota
25.) Bill MCCoy
26.) Paul Bizier
27.) John Burroughs

INSTRUCTION ONLY:
1.) Al Brown
2.) Clark Cone
3.) John Cizmar
4.) Jim Dick
?
Thanks,
Greg Martin

.






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The SHAKE N TAKE clinic is a full house

Greg Martin
 

Guys,

We are completely full and we will see you all in Cocoa Beach in January.










Guys,
The list is now complete for the online pre registration for the Shake N
Take clinic. We'll have a few?slots left for those registering at the door with no Internet access. I have also added for slots for what Al Brown suggests as "Instruction Only" which will give you access to a handout for the modeling of the kit that I provide for the folks listed below. So let me get this out to you all and know that if you would like to add yourself under "Instruction Only".

Also let me correct the time for the clinic: Friday January 09, 2009 at 3:30
PM in the Seahorse & Starfish Roo.

Here's the current list"

1.) Armend Premo
2.) Dr. Denny Anspach
3.) Tony Thompson
4.) Mont Switzer
5.) Schuyler Larrabee
6.) John Greedy
7.) William Bell
8.) Jeff Alley
9.) Mike Brock (if we can get him to stand still for 5 minutes)
10.) Gary Laakso
11.) Roger Hinman
13.) Richard Hendrickson
14.) Paul Lyons
15.) Bruce Smith
16.) Brian Carlson
17.) Jerry Glow
18.) John G Wheeler
19.) Dick Berry
20.) Lindsay Raley
21.) John Golden
22.) Owne Thorne
23.) Chirs Zygmont
24.) Ted Cullota
25.) Bill MCCoy
26.) Paul Bizier
27.) John Burroughs

INSTRUCTION ONLY:
1.) Al Brown
2.) Clark Cone
3.) John Cizmar
4.) Jim Dick
?
Thanks,
Greg Martin

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