Date   

Naperville

gn3397 <heninger@...>
 

Hello,
I was hoping I could prevail on the experience of the Naperville veterans in the group.
What forms of payment do the vendors (especially Bob's Photos and Jay Williams, etc.) take at
Naperville? Do I need cash, or will I be able to use a credit card? This is the first time I will be
able to go, so thanks for the help.

Sincerely,
Robert D. Heninger
Iowa City, Iowa


Re: Air Dump Car Question...

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

Jack,
I picked up a MEW car some time ago with thoughts of rebuilding. Have you considered an article on your project?

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Air Dump Car Question...

Jack Burgess
 

Robert wrote:

The cylinders would not necessarily have to at mid stroke with
the body in normal position. As long as the rod end ("Live End")
has a clevis that can act as a hinge that cylinder can be fully
retracted while the opposite side works. The same arrangements
would be on the opposite side.
When I read this last night and other comments about not seeing the piston rod at all except for when the body was being dumped, I thought that I'd need to rebuild my model this morning. But I finally understood Robert's answer (and Richard Brennan's comment) and realized that they are referring to a more "modern" design which uses two cylinders per side and the body rotates around the piston attachment points on the side not being raised. However, my model is of an older design side dump on which the body pivots on pedestals along the center of the frame. In studying the photos that I have, a portion of the piston rod is visible. (Unfortunately, I'm using an old MEW kit as the basis of the model which is correct size-wise but the body seems slightly too high off of the frame, exposing more of the piston rod than it should.)

Lastly, those dump cars used air. If the cylinder were not fully
retracted, that opposite side would be "spongy' and not support
the weight very well.
On the model I'm building, I'm guessing that both cylinders would need to be pressurized slightly (and thus working against each other) so that they were pushing against the body to keep it level for loading and travel. There were a pair of safety chains on each side from the body to the bolsters to keep the body from tipping in the case of loss of air pressure.

Thanks for everyone's help...

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Re: giraffe loading, 1955

Richard White
 

I must be the only member of this group who has loaded giraffes onto a railroad car.
This was in East Africa on the metre gauge East African Railways in 1969/70.
We did not sedate them, they are docile in captivity.
We didn't use box cars but low-side gondolas.
The giraffe were loaded in crates - one per crate.
We loaded two crates to a car and one attendant rode on every car.
The crates were fitted with adjustable cross-bars so that the giraffe was compelled to keep its head within load-gauge.
The trip from Tororo to Mombasa took two days and was the finest railroading experience on the planet. Descending the Mau escarpment from Timboroa summit at dawn was pure magic a memory that remains vivid nearly 40 years later and which I will treasure until the day that I die.
Richard White


Re: 1940s tank car questions

Randy Hammill
 

In New Britain, CT, the Armour and Swift local plants were in adjacent
buildings.

But that's not what I found most interesting. In the 2 or so mile
section of mainline that has the largest number of industries served
there are at least 8 fuel companies. Most of them are coal & wood, but
a couple are oil. And those aren't the only ones in town either.

Randy Hammill
http://newbritainstation.com


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Kurt Laughlin" <fleeta@...> wrote:

You can add to the example list Beaver Falls PA which had both Armour
and
Cudahy packing houses, in adjacent buildings. Also, curiously, three
to
four scrap yards at any given time.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Dennis Storzek

. . . the reality of the situation is that most places that were
large
enough to support one of a type of
merchant normally had two, in competition with each other. . .


Re: Air Dump Car Question...

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Richard Brennan wrote:
There are some good "as-built" photos in Kaminski's "Magor Car Corporation" book...
Pages 145-147 show shiny steel piston rods. The photo on p145 is noted by Magor as "identical to SPMW 2900-2919"...
True, but all shiny rods shown are with the car body in the full dump position. NONE of the piston rods shown anywhere in the book are shiny in the normal position.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Air Dump Car Question...

Richard Brennan <brennan8@...>
 

At 07:40 PM 10/24/2008, Jack Burgess wrote:
<snip>
My question...should the piston rod coming out of these
air cylinders be a "shiny" steel color similar to the steel piston rods you
see on hydraulic construction equipment such as backhoes or some other color?
There are some good "as-built" photos in Kaminski's "Magor Car Corporation" book...
Pages 145-147 show shiny steel piston rods.
The photo on p145 is noted by Magor as "identical to SPMW 2900-2919"...


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------


Re: Air Dump Car Question...

Bill Vaughn
 

The rods are a shiney silver just like the pistons on a brake cylinder.

--- On Fri, 10/24/08, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@opendoor.com> wrote:

From: Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@opendoor.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Air Dump Car Question...
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Friday, October 24, 2008, 8:11 PM






On Oct 24, 2008, at 7:40 PM, Jack Burgess wrote:

I'm in the process of painting a model of a Western air operated
side dump
car. These cars had an air cylinder on each side of the frame to
raise the
body for dumping. My question...should the piston rod coming out of
these
air cylinders be a "shiny" steel color similar to the steel piston
rods you
see on hydraulic construction equipment such as backhoes or some other
color?
Jack, in the photos I have of air dump cars, the shiny piston rods
are only visible when they are extended in order to tip the dump
body, not when they are in the normal position with the body level.

Richard Hendrickson

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Air Dump Car Question...

rfederle@...
 

I have not studied these cars other than photos either. I have over 30 years as a Marine Chief Engineer and worked with thousands of Pneumati and Hydraulic Cylinders.

The cylinders would not necessarily have to at mid stroke with the body in normal position. As long as the rod end ("Live End") has a clevis that can act as a hinge that cylinder can be fully retracted while the opposite side works. The same arrangements would be on the opposite side.

Technically, the cylinder should be fully retracted for strength since the opposite will be "pushing" against it. If the application wiould need precision possitioning you would need all cylinders to operate with some sort of individual control device for that positioning.

Lastly, those dump cars used air. If the cylinder were not fully retracted, that opposite side would be "spongy' and not support the weight very well. We have pneumatic cylinders for positioning and they do not have much force. Hydraulics would be needed for strength and force.

If you could substitute the (assumed) plastic "rods" for steel you would not have to worry about paint as you would have the real steel finish.

Hope I have not confused you further.

Robert Federle
---- Jack Burgess <jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com> wrote:

That is what I was thinking too. Unfortunately, the photos that I have don't
show the rod that well. But if one side of the dump goes up, the other side
has to go down and thus it would seem that both rods need to be at mid-level
in the non-dump position. On the other hand, I might be mis-understanding
the operations....

Jack

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of
Richard Hendrickson
Sent: Friday, October 24, 2008 8:12 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Air Dump Car Question...


On Oct 24, 2008, at 7:40 PM, Jack Burgess wrote:

I'm in the process of painting a model of a Western air operated
side dump
car. These cars had an air cylinder on each side of the frame to
raise the
body for dumping. My question...should the piston rod coming out of
these
air cylinders be a "shiny" steel color similar to the steel piston
rods you
see on hydraulic construction equipment such as backhoes or some other
color?







Jack, in the photos I have of air dump cars, the shiny piston rods
are only visible when they are extended in order to tip the dump
body, not when they are in the normal position with the body level.

Richard Hendrickson






------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: Air Dump Car Question...

Richard Brennan <brennan8@...>
 

At 08:44 PM 10/24/2008, Jack Burgess wrote:
That is what I was thinking too. Unfortunately, the photos that I have don't
show the rod that well. But if one side of the dump goes up, the other side
has to go down and thus it would seem that both rods need to be at mid-level
in the non-dump position. On the other hand, I might be mis-understanding
the operations....
I thought the clevis at the top of the non-extended piston rod was the pivot point...
and since the cylinder is inboard of the car side (as close to the center sill as possible)
it only makes the tilted car body appear to have been lowered on the non-extended side.
..but I too may be mis-understanding.


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------


Re: Air Dump Car Question...

Jack Burgess
 

That is what I was thinking too. Unfortunately, the photos that I have don't
show the rod that well. But if one side of the dump goes up, the other side
has to go down and thus it would seem that both rods need to be at mid-level
in the non-dump position. On the other hand, I might be mis-understanding
the operations....

Jack

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of
Richard Hendrickson
Sent: Friday, October 24, 2008 8:12 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Air Dump Car Question...


On Oct 24, 2008, at 7:40 PM, Jack Burgess wrote:

I'm in the process of painting a model of a Western air operated
side dump
car. These cars had an air cylinder on each side of the frame to
raise the
body for dumping. My question...should the piston rod coming out of
these
air cylinders be a "shiny" steel color similar to the steel piston
rods you
see on hydraulic construction equipment such as backhoes or some other
color?







Jack, in the photos I have of air dump cars, the shiny piston rods
are only visible when they are extended in order to tip the dump
body, not when they are in the normal position with the body level.

Richard Hendrickson






------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: Air Dump Car Question...

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Oct 24, 2008, at 7:40 PM, Jack Burgess wrote:

I'm in the process of painting a model of a Western air operated
side dump
car. These cars had an air cylinder on each side of the frame to
raise the
body for dumping. My question...should the piston rod coming out of
these
air cylinders be a "shiny" steel color similar to the steel piston
rods you
see on hydraulic construction equipment such as backhoes or some other
color?







Jack, in the photos I have of air dump cars, the shiny piston rods
are only visible when they are extended in order to tip the dump
body, not when they are in the normal position with the body level.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Air Dump Car Question...

rfederle@...
 

I would say the rod should be shiny. Whether the cylinder is air or hydraulic the seal at that end has to be maintained in good condition to withstand the pressures inside the cylinder. If the rod becomes dirty or pitted it will allow leakage and reduce efficiency.

In operation the rod will barely be exposed when the hopper body is in the normal position. the rod will be highly visible in the raised or dumping position.

That is my proffessional opinion.

Robert Federle
---- Jack Burgess <jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com> wrote:

I'm in the process of painting a model of a Western air operated side dump
car. These cars had an air cylinder on each side of the frame to raise the
body for dumping. My question...should the piston rod coming out of these
air cylinders be a "shiny" steel color similar to the steel piston rods you
see on hydraulic construction equipment such as backhoes or some other
color?

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Re: autoracks, ca. 1915

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Schuyler Larrabee wrote:
Anybody hazard a guess at what kind of cars those are?
They sure look like flat cars to me. Or isn't that the question?

Tony Thompson Editor
Ba-dump-bump!

OK wise guy, I meant the AUTOMOBILES!!

SGL


Air Dump Car Question...

Jack Burgess
 

I'm in the process of painting a model of a Western air operated side dump
car. These cars had an air cylinder on each side of the frame to raise the
body for dumping. My question...should the piston rod coming out of these
air cylinders be a "shiny" steel color similar to the steel piston rods you
see on hydraulic construction equipment such as backhoes or some other
color?

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Re: autoracks, ca. 1915

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Schuyler Larrabee wrote:
Anybody hazard a guess at what kind of cars those are?
They sure look like flat cars to me. Or isn't that the question?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: autoracks, ca. 1915

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Anybody hazard a guess at what kind of cars those are?

SGL

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Paul Krueger
Sent: Friday, October 24, 2008 5:30 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] autoracks, ca. 1915

Here is another interesting photo.

http://tinyurl.com/6jx22g <http://tinyurl.com/6jx22g>

http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm-
desmo/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/imlsmohai&CISOPTR=2284&CISOBOX=1&REC=5
<http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm-
desmo/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/imlsmohai&CISOPTR=2284&CISOBOX=1&REC=5>

Paul
Seattle, WA




Re: autoracks, ca. 1915

sswcharlie <railroads@...>
 

Any more photos of this subject. Very intereting. How were the top
rwo of cars secured ?

thks

Charlie Harris

Here is another interesting photo.

http://tinyurl.com/6jx22g


autoracks, ca. 1915

Paul Krueger <kruegerp@...>
 


Re: giraffe loading, 1955

Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...>
 

Guyz,
 
          Have to agree that the animal was sedated for the trip. Considering how much one of these critters costs, they could not afford to have it pop up it's head through an underpass, or tunnel. Let sleeping giraffes lie.
 
Fred Freitas

--- On Fri, 10/24/08, Charlie Vlk <cvlk@comcast.net> wrote:

From: Charlie Vlk <cvlk@comcast.net>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] giraffe loading, 1955
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Friday, October 24, 2008, 4:58 PM






Circus Stock Cars were taller than normal Automobile Box Cars, but not so much so that giraffes could stand up with their necks stretched at normal posture.
I guess they just got a pain in the neck or laid down.
Charlie Vlk

Hello Everyone,

Did they sedate the giraffe ? How did the circus do it?

John Riba
.

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