Date   

Re: Photo: Pacific Electric Flat Car 3643 (F-50-8)

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

Photo: Pacific Electric Flat Car 3643 (F-50-8)

A 1923 photo from the Columbus Metropolitan Library:

https://digital-collections.columbuslibrary.org/digital/collection/transport/id/2444/rec/599


    This builder photo is in my Volume 3 of the series, _Southern Pacific Freight Cars_ for anyone who may have the book.

Tony Thompson




Photo: DT&I Boxcar 8425 (Built 1893)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: DT&I Boxcar 8425 (Built 1893)

A photo from the Columbus Metropolitan Library:

https://digital-collections.columbuslibrary.org/digital/collection/transport/id/4630/rec/22

This is a very clear photo and can be enlarged quite a bit.

My thanks to Bill West on the PRR Group for the link tip.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Pacific Electric Flat Car 3643 (F-50-8)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Pacific Electric Flat Car 3643 (F-50-8)

A 1923 photo from the Columbus Metropolitan Library:

https://digital-collections.columbuslibrary.org/digital/collection/transport/id/2444/rec/599

This is a very clear photo and can be enlarged quite a bit.

My thanks to Bill West on the PRR Group for the link tip.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: ID needed

Tony Thompson
 

"Some produce didn’t need icing-just air flow. Potatoes, and I believe onions among the produce were so shipped."

     This comment is misleading. Every type of produce had a preferred shipping temperature and the range was very broad, from 33 degrees to 65 degrees or more (Fahrenheit). In the fall, cooler weather meant that crops like potatoes and onions, at the upper end of those temperature ranges, could be shipped with ventilation only and achieve the desired temperatures. But that depended on outside temperature, so a blanket statement that a kind of produce "didn't need icing" cannot be general.
      The USDA table of those temperatures is on page 345 of the PFE book.

Tony Thompson




Re: SHPX ORER help needed

Bob Chaparro
 

Some background on FMC:

The California Fruit Growers Exchange encouraged the Food Machinery Corporation to enter the field of citrus machinery. FMC started as a national consolidation of various manufacturers of vegetable drying and packing equipment, fruit canning machines, and agricultural spray pumps. Many citrus packing houses operated with FMC equipment.

In 1940, FMC helped design a light amphibious tracked vehicle. The government gave FMC the contract to build military versions of the vehicle, with an assembly line in Florida and another in Riverside.

Several types of the Landing Vehicle, Tracked (LVT, also known as the Water Buffalo) were produced, with Riverside responsible for the gun turret version, the LVT-4. The Riverside main plant also manufactured

spare parts for the vehicles.

During World War II, FMC built 11,251 LVT vehicles, receiving in 1945 the Army-Navy "E" award for outstanding war production. Changing its name to the Food Machinery and Chemical Corporation in 1948, operations continued during the

Korean War with retrofitting of the older LVT models and also building different vehicle types. In 1949 a monument, complete with LVT, was dedicated to the factory war workers at Fairmount Park (Riverside, CA) near the location where they had conducted testing.

The FMC Corporation (its moniker since 1961) continued operations worldwide with its chemical divisions, military contracts (including ones for the M113 and the Bradley Fighting Vehicle), and its agricultural and machinery systems.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Canadian National 7-panel Howe Truss Boxcars Help

ed_mines
 

There was an article on these cars along with drawings in Mainline Modeler.


Re: TNM hopper car suitable model

Tim O'Connor
 


I think that's an Enterprise door mechanism - like the one in the Tichy USRA kit.


On 5/20/2020 4:48 PM, Nathan Obermeyer via groups.io wrote:

In 1953 the Texas New Mexico Railroad received 200 70-ton hopper cars (road numbers T-NM 100-299) (later T-NM 500000-500183) built by the Texas and Pacific Railroad at Marshall, Tx. I'd like to see if there is a suitable HO scale model that one of these cars can be built. Is this car a AAR design like the Atlas Trainman AAR 70-ton hopper? Did any other model manufacturer produce a similar hopper car? I've attached the Mopac diagram for the car and an image of the car. Thanks,

Nate

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Canadian National 7-panel Howe Truss Boxcars Help

James Brewer
 

Bill,

I am currently working on two of these cars which Marc Simpson recently had re-run by Sylvan.  The prototype notes included with the instructions suggest the boxcars with wood doors were built in 1929, and those with steel doors in 1930-31.  It also mentions doors were sometimes swapped from steel to wood and vice versa during shoppings and repairs.

In Ted Culotta''s Steam Era Freight Cars Seminar Manual he has a photo of CN 503559, built in 1929 and it does have wood doors.  There is also a photo of CN 506951, built in 1930, with steel doors.  Ted references an article in Railmodel Journal, June 1994, by Stafford Swain.  You can view, but not print it, here:

http://magazine.trainlife.com/rmj_1994_6/

I also referred to Ian Cranstone's web site for information on these cars:  http://www.nakina.net/cn/cn5.html

I hope this helps!

Jim Brewer


Re: Accurail DL&W 40 Foot DD Box Car

Staffan Ehnbom
 

The Accurail 40' double door box car started out as a McKean effort to model the GN 3000-3499 series built 1955 having a recessed diagonal panel roof, a 7 and an 8 foot door and a fish belly side sill. Bill McKean blushingly told me that an adviser told him double 6 foot doors were more common and so Bill changed prototype to the GN 3500-3999 series that had the double 6 foot doors but missed the overhanging roof and kept the fish belly side sill. Bill made a habit of trying to hide behind his desk at the few trade shows I had the chance to attend. Attached is a model photo of a McKean car with a new roof and with side sills straightened.

Staffan Ehnbom

On Wed, May 20, 2020 at 6:14 PM Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Ken -

My January 1952 ORER shows DL&W series 11300-11599 as 40'-7" IL double door boxcars with 12'-6" wide door openings, AAR mech designation XMR (auto racks installed).  This is the same number series that Yarmouth Models' new kit for a DL&W rebuilt 40' DD auto boxcar portrays. 

I believe that the Accurail kit depicts a GN series of DD cars that were built new or rebuilds in the mid-1950s and used extensively in lumber and plywood loading.  Someone with a a better memory and/or who knows GN equipment better is welcome to comment and correct me.

Todd Sullivan  


Re: Canadian National 7-panel Howe Truss Boxcars Help

Dave Parker
 

Bill, I believe these cars are the subject of Ted's EFC #8.

Best regards.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: TNM hopper car suitable model

Sam Reynolds <monon@...>
 

Nate,

Attached is a photo I quickly took of an Atlas 70-ton 9 panel 3-bay hopper that I stripped for another project. I took some measurements of the car so you can compare them to the diagram sheet. The measurements are as follows: 43'6" over end top chord; 41'3" inside length; 43'3" over strikers; 42'9" over end sills; 34' truck centers; 10'6" over side top chord. You will see from the attached photo that all of the side ribs are riveted unlike those shown in your prototype photo. I don't have one of the MDC/Roundhouse cars, but if I remember correctly they were shorter than the Atlas hopper and had riveted side ribs like the Atlas car. If interested, I have 10 of these hoppers that I'm selling since I no longer need them for kitbashing into L&N Pullman Standard PS-3 coal hoppers.

Sam Reynolds


Canadian National 7-panel Howe Truss Boxcars Help

Bill Welch
 

Over the years three models have been done of the CN's 7-panel Howe Truss Boxcars—F&C ()originally Steam Shack I think), Sylvan, and Kaslo Shops. I am interested in trying to understand built dates and breakdown of cars with wood doors and steel doors. Have there been any articles in the hobby press or perhaps the CNHS about these cars. Perhaps someone may be able to scan article if they have it. Thank you.

Bill Welch


Re: ID needed

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

Bill S. wrote:

"Some produce didn’t need icing-just air flow. Potatoes, and I believe onions among the produce were so shipped. Were some (uninsulated) cars used for the brief(heavy) potato runs(seed potatoes in the spring, product in the fall)? Those cars could be used for other purposes the rest of the year. ACL ‘Watermellon’ (ventilated)cars had barred doors, and regular doors for other freight. The insulation, bunkers, etc. would use up a lot of space. Does anyone know if they had ‘ventilated’ box cars? Respectfully, Bill S."

Hi Bill,

    Your post is a little confusing  with regard to ventilated boxcars in that it seen you might think they were insulated where I've never heard of that being the case. The whole purpose of ventiated boxcars was to provide air flow through the cars in the warmer months to prevent crops like watermelons from begining to over ripen or rot.  In theory I suppose bagged potatoes could be shipped in ventilated boxcars during the early fall and late spring months when there was no chance for them to freeze or overheat though I have no knowledge of that ever being done. They are best kept in cool, dry condtions. which is why roads like the Bangor & Aroostook rostered so many insulated box cars. These cars were not refrigerated but certainly were insulated and some also had heaters for use in winter shipment. In the hottest summer months refrigerated cars had to be used to prevent spoilage enroute. Most export seed potatoes from the US normally moved in the winter to be where they were needed by spring in the northern hemisphere. The last time I was in Winterport, Maine during the winter was between Christmas and New Year in 1976, Winterport having docking faciities just up the Penobscot River from its mouth at Searsport. At that time there was a German freighter loading seed potatoes and three or four more riding at anchor in the river waiting their turn. Unfortunately the grade of seed potatoes that were sent down the BAR for them did not meet the inspectors requirements, so we were told on the return trip when questions were asked as to where all the ship went so quckly. We were told they had sailed for New Orleans to load seed potatoes from Idaho instead. This was business lost to the BAR due to issues with Aroostook County potato growers not taking proper care of their crops in harvesting and storage. Before increasing the number of its own insulated boxcars and reefers in the post WW II era the BAR used large numbers of MDT reefers in the white paint with the blue & red strripes along the bottom of their sides. Entire trains of these cars were turned over to the Maine Central which in turn handed them over to the Boston & Maine to move them along to their destinations outsie of New England. Now almost all potatoes leaving main are shipped in tractor-trailer loads. From the mid-1970's on many of the BAR's insulaed boxcars and reefers were conversed into wood chip cars at the road's shop in Derby, Maine

    I can't speak about onion transport but expect some of the folks in Iowa might hace some knowledge of that.

My best, Don Valentine


Re: My latest Covid build

O Fenton Wells
 

Thanks Dave


On May 20, 2020, at 9:32 PM, A&Y Dave in MD <dbott@...> wrote:

 I agree, the weathering is great--doesn't takeaway from the detail but makes it look a lot less like a model.

Dave

Wednesday, May 20, 2020, 6:27:55 PM, you wrote:


Southern covered hopper by F&C .  Light weathering as the car was 1951 and the era is about that time



--
David Bott

Sent from David Bott's desktop PC
--
____________________________
David Bott, modeling the A&Y in '34


Re: My latest Covid build

Paul Doggett
 

Fenton 

That’s very nice and a large hopper for 1951.

Paul Doggett.   England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 20 May 2020, at 23:28, O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...> wrote:

Southern covered hopper by F&C .  Light weathering as the car was 1951 and the era is about that time

Attachments:


Re: Best Model Trucks for B&O M-55 Boxcars

Dave Parker
 

Bruce:

They are planked, have Barber Lateral Motion, and the end of the truck bolster is a dead ringer for the Tahoe x09.  Sideframe is a little different, but it looks like a decent match to my eye.



--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: SHPX ORER help needed

Aley, Jeff A
 

Jim,

 

               This is exactly what I needed.  Thanks for taking the trouble to scan it for me!

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Brewer
Sent: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 4:26 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] SHPX ORER help needed

 

Jeff,

I hope this helps; difficult to get the book flat enough on the scanner.

Jim Brewer


Best Model Trucks for B&O M-55 Boxcars

Bruce Griffin
 

Friends,

Any thoughts on the best HO scale trucks to match the ones in the attached photos? Thank you.

Best Regards,
Bruce D. Griffin
Ashland, MD
https://bomodeling.com/blog/

 


Re: My latest Covid build

A&Y Dave in MD
 

I agree, the weathering is great--doesn't takeaway from the detail but makes it look a lot less like a model.

Dave

Wednesday, May 20, 2020, 6:27:55 PM, you wrote:


Southern covered hopper by F&C .  Light weathering as the car was 1951 and the era is about that time



--
David Bott

Sent from David Bott's desktop PC
--
____________________________
David Bott, modeling the A&Y in '34


Re: Update - Latest run of Intermountain (Wegmann) HO PFE Rebuilt Reefers

Nelson Moyer
 

Thanks for the update, Dick. I'm relieved that the only issues have to do with the brake system, which is easy to fix.

Nelson Moyer

-----Original Message-----
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dick Harley via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 7:29 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Cc: Steve Hile <shile@mindspring.com>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Update - Latest run of Intermountain (Wegmann) HO PFE Rebuilt Reefers


Well, I received my samples of these reefers and was quite relieved to see that they used my new artwork on all the models. Several people, including myself, were making judgements about the models based on the photos in the InterMountain advertising flyer, without noticing that the photos were NOT of car numbers in this latest run.

So, the lettering is perfect (yeah, I did the artwork). The colors are just fine. The lettering can be matched with the Microscale 2-sheet set 87-501, for those wishing to change the car numbers or reweigh dates or repack dates or anything else. The -21s have fan control plates. The all orange-sided 1953-era car uses Terry’s side with the top facia board as part of the side. The assembly is very clean. Any thoughts of stripping these cars is lunacy, in my opinion.

Now the bad news, which you already know. The brake system has several issues and mistakes. Steve Hile is working on a presentation to show how to fix most things, and I am assisting him. That should be ready in a few days. I am also working on a SmugMug gallery with prototype data, and I’ll announce that soon, when I feel more confident of what I say and have more images.

So overall, these are fine and important cars to add to a steam era freight car roster.


Stay Safe & Healthy,
Dick Harley
Laguna Beach, CA

11941 - 11960 of 185271