Date   

Re: Sheetrock by Rail

rwitt_2000 <rmwitt@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, modeltrainguy@... wrote:

On 19 Apr 2007 at 3:39, tbarney2004 wrote:

I can say that it was available in at least some form in the 50's.
The dump...err house (which dates to the early 50's not far from the
O&W Kingston branch - gotta get that STMFC connection somehow)...I'm
currently trying to make somewhat habitable was done with some form of
18" wide sheets of 1/2" thick gypsum board. Mostly paper backed, but
foil backed on the exterior walls (and of course, no insulation in
It's called Rock Lathe. It was the alternative to wood lathe which did
not meet fire code regulations when building codes were introduced
in the late forties. This stuff and method of plastering is still
available
today at your better Gypsum dealers. Insurance companies still
provide coverage for replacement of fire or water damaged walls
with this method if the home owner carries replacement cost guarantee
coverage. We have a contractor in Wisconsin that still provides
this service.

Chris Zygmunt
Yes, this is the construction I am familiar with that existed in
Wisconsin post-WWII. The wood lath was replaced by "Rock Lathe" which
was cover with plaster just like the earlier wood lath. Later in the
1960's builders introduced the in which studs were sheathed with "dry
wall" and used joint compound and tape to cover the seams. I assume
the building codes were changed to allow this method of construction.

Builder supply companies without railroad access would receive rail
shipments at the local "team track".

Bob Witt, Indianapolis, Indiana


Re: Shameless Commercial Announcement - II

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Russ Strodtz" <sheridan@...> wrote:

Clark,

I'm sorry but I'm not sure of what you are selling.

Russ
Sorry for my first reply attempt. I hit the wrong bottom. Anyway, Russ,
I was just giving our friends at Branchline Trains a compliment.
Clark Propst


Re: Shameless Commercial Announcement - II

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Russ Strodtz" <sheridan@...> wrote:

Clark,

I'm sorry but I'm not sure of what you are selling.

Russ
----- Original Message -----
From: rockroll50401
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, 19 April, 2007 09:38
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Shameless Commercial Announcement - II


Bill,
I was at a guy's house last night who showed me three of our
RTR cars
he had lined up on his kitchen counter. They look very nice.
Clark Propst








Re: Sheetrock by Rail

CJ Riley
 

I have been avoiding adding to the clutter, but I can no longer resist. As a
young architect in Pittsburgh in the '60s, I was often at odds with contractors
and suppliers who wanted to provide skim coat plaster, a thin coating of
plaster over 4x8 drywakll sheets. This eliminated a lot of joint finishing and
was normally applied with a swirley "sand finish" so it would look "just like
plaster" but more economical. I always recoiled at the horrible swirely finish
that was standard in residential constuction then. It was even common to swirl
a pattern around the ceiling fixtures. Double ugh!!

CJ Riley

--- oandle <oandle@yahoo.com> wrote:

I own a house near Akron, Ohio, and the interior was finished in
exactly the same way as Tim descibes below. The house was built in 1943.
Bob Weston


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "tbarney2004" <tbarney@...> wrote:

I can say that it was available in at least some form in the 50's.
18" wide sheets of 1/2" thick gypsum board. Mostly paper backed,
This was finished with a hardshell skim coat of plaster (
So I'm wondering if it was a regional thing in the northeast, or of
this would have been a nationwide product being shuttled around in
a myriad of otherwise unremarkable boxcars?

Tim Barney

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Don Worthy <don_worthy@> wrote:

Hey fellows, I didn't think that "sheetrock" was around in the 40s
or even the early 50s. > > Don Worthy


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Early SOU Pulpwood Flats

culturalinfidel9 <djmiller@...>
 

I'm looking for photos or drawings of Southern pulpwood cars in the
following series:

115000 - 116599 (SOU, 267 cars)
117500 - 117999 (SOU, 201 cars)
325000 - 325579 (NO&NE, 30 cars)
300230 - 300473 (AGS, 40 cars)

The cars indicated were converted to pulpwood cars from standard flat
cars between 1934 and 1937. If anyone has photos/drawings or could
point me to sources of same, I would be much obliged.

Thank you,
Dan Miller


Re: Shameless Commercial Announcement - II

branchline@...
 

Thanks Clark. Woudl like to think that they started with a halfway decent kit... :>)

Honestly, I have been very happy with the assembly jobs so far now that we're past the initial learning curve of what they can do vs. what we expect.

Bill

----- Original Message -----
From: rockroll50401
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, April 19, 2007 9:38 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Shameless Commercial Announcement - II


Bill,
I was at a guy's house last night who showed me three of our RTR cars
he had lined up on his kitchen counter. They look very nice.
Clark Propst


Re: Shameless Commercial Announcement - II

Russ Strodtz <sheridan@...>
 

Clark,

I'm sorry but I'm not sure of what you are selling.

Russ

----- Original Message -----
From: rockroll50401
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, 19 April, 2007 09:38
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Shameless Commercial Announcement - II


Bill,
I was at a guy's house last night who showed me three of our
RTR cars
he had lined up on his kitchen counter. They look very nice.
Clark Propst


Re: Sheetrock by Rail

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 


The IC built two series of bulkhead flat cars for wallboard loading
late in the time frame covered here. built in
1959 and 1960. some existing flatcars had bulk
heads added, after 1960.

Chet French
Dixon, IL
That's interesting. I was told that the RRs serving Ft Dodge (IC, CGW,
M&StL, FtDDMS) pooled BH Flats. Starting in 54 with home built BHs on
exsisting flats. I have photos of only the CGW and M&StL cars tho.

Gyp from Ft Dodge is used in the Cement making industry and shipped to
the plant in Dixon.
Clark Propst
~90 miles NE of Ft Dodge


Re: Shameless Commercial Announcement - II

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

Bill,
I was at a guy's house last night who showed me three of our RTR cars
he had lined up on his kitchen counter. They look very nice.
Clark Propst


Re: Sheetrock by Rail

Russ Strodtz <sheridan@...>
 

All,

Most of the CB&Q's bulkhead flat conversions were done
to supply a U.S. Gypsum plant at Sperry IA on the branch
to Mediapolis IA. This was last line on CB&Q where 4-4-2's
were regularly used.

EJ&E did a lot of conversions with rather low bulkheads to
supply a plant at Waukegan IL. IHB had some that looked the
same for a plant in East Chicago IN.

After this list's target years CB&Q had a track off Main 3
at Westmont IL. There were two drywall dealers on the same
track. They used off road type forklifts to unload. When
I say "After" I only mean that I do not know when that track
started being used for that purpose. It could have been
before 1960.

Russ

----- Original Message -----
From: Dennis Storzek
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, 19 April, 2007 07:47
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Sheetrock by Rail


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, modeltrainguy@... wrote:
>
> It's called Rock Lathe. It was the alternative to wood lathe
which did
> not meet fire code regulations when building codes were
introduced
> in the late forties. This stuff and method of plastering is
still
available
> today at your better Gypsum dealers. Insurance companies still
> provide coverage for replacement of fire or water damaged
walls
> with this method if the home owner carries replacement cost
guarantee
> coverage. We have a contractor in Wisconsin that still
provides
> this service.
>
> Chris Zygmunt


Re: Sheetrock by Rail

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, modeltrainguy@... wrote:

It's called Rock Lathe. It was the alternative to wood lathe which did
not meet fire code regulations when building codes were introduced
in the late forties. This stuff and method of plastering is still
available
today at your better Gypsum dealers. Insurance companies still
provide coverage for replacement of fire or water damaged walls
with this method if the home owner carries replacement cost guarantee
coverage. We have a contractor in Wisconsin that still provides
this service.

Chris Zygmunt

From usinspect.com

"Gypsum or rock lath is a pre-manufactured plaster board, generally 16
inches by 48 inches in size, and 3/8 inch thick. Rock lath became
popular in the 1930s as a less expensive alternative to wood lath. It
is nailed directly to the wall studs and receives two coats of plaster
over it. The rock lath is called the first coat and replaces the wood
lath and the brown coat of the previous wet plaster system. The
second coat is a cement plaster about 1/4 inch to 3/8 inch thick. The
finish coat is then applied, which is comprised of hard finish
plaster, and is approximately 1/8 inch thick."

"Rock laths can be identified by a crack pattern that may be visible
in ceilings and walls or may be visible on the backside of walls in
areas such as the attic."

This is considered traditional plaster construction, not "dry wall",
because it isn't dry. I guess I forgot that the sheets cover three
studs, as I've been saying 16" X 32"; they're 16" X 48".

Dennis


Re: Sheetrock by Rail

modeltrainguy@...
 

On 19 Apr 2007 at 3:39, tbarney2004 wrote:

I can say that it was available in at least some form in the 50's.
The dump...err house (which dates to the early 50's not far from the
O&W Kingston branch - gotta get that STMFC connection somehow)...I'm
currently trying to make somewhat habitable was done with some form of
18" wide sheets of 1/2" thick gypsum board. Mostly paper backed, but
foil backed on the exterior walls (and of course, no insulation in
It's called Rock Lathe. It was the alternative to wood lathe which did
not meet fire code regulations when building codes were introduced
in the late forties. This stuff and method of plastering is still available
today at your better Gypsum dealers. Insurance companies still
provide coverage for replacement of fire or water damaged walls
with this method if the home owner carries replacement cost guarantee
coverage. We have a contractor in Wisconsin that still provides
this service.

Chris Zygmunt


Re: Sheetrock by Rail

Bob Weston
 

I own a house near Akron, Ohio, and the interior was finished in
exactly the same way as Tim descibes below. The house was built in 1943.
Bob Weston


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "tbarney2004" <tbarney@...> wrote:

I can say that it was available in at least some form in the 50's.
18" wide sheets of 1/2" thick gypsum board. Mostly paper backed,
This was finished with a hardshell skim coat of plaster (
So I'm wondering if it was a regional thing in the northeast, or of
this would have been a nationwide product being shuttled around in
a myriad of otherwise unremarkable boxcars?

Tim Barney

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Don Worthy <don_worthy@> wrote:

Hey fellows, I didn't think that "sheetrock" was around in the 40s
or even the early 50s. > > Don Worthy


Re: Athearn C&NW 65 ft mill gon

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Tim O'Connor writes:

"Maybe they chose to cater to (gasp!) the post-transition era?? After all many
modelers like those 1960's cars (incredible as it may seem!)"

Well, I suppose it might be incredible to some that "1960's cars" are liked. Personally, it doesn't surprise me at all. However, my guess is that most of the 1949 built cars [ 132001-132099 ] existed in the '60's and probably later than that. Soooo, doing the 132001-132099 class would be useful for both steam era AND post steam era modelers. Doing the 95000-95199 class simply means that someone modeling prior to 1958 would have no use for it. And that's why I left one in my local hobby shop today. Could I renumber it? Certainly. But I have about 400 other cars waiting to be serviced and I decided adding one more might cause a collapse of the railroad room.

Mike Brock


Re: SP A-50-10 Fifty Foot, OB end door Boxcar

Bill Kelly
 

Tony,
Take another look, the A end is sheathed like the sides. There is a 5'-6
1/2" belt rail starting 2'-1" the floor on the sides.This belt rail
extends up a little farther on the A end due to the arrangement of the
depressions in the end. I agree that the end doors do not appear to be
sheathed.

Later,
Bill Kelly


Tony wrote:
Gary, as I read the Cyc drawing (reproduced in my Volume 3)
there was no end lining at either end, but I don't have an interior
photo
to be sure.


Re: Sheetrock by Rail

tbarney2004
 

I can say that it was available in at least some form in the 50's.
The dump...err house (which dates to the early 50's not far from the
O&W Kingston branch - gotta get that STMFC connection somehow)...I'm
currently trying to make somewhat habitable was done with some form of
18" wide sheets of 1/2" thick gypsum board. Mostly paper backed, but
foil backed on the exterior walls (and of course, no insulation in
said walls). Some is also stamped that it's approved for use (can't
remember exact wording) in NYC meeting all applicable NYC and FD
codes. This was finished with a hardshell skim coat of plaster (and
I'd have expected lathe and plaster myself). As for shipping, or who
manufactured the stuff (unless it's marked on the side that was skim
coated I don't remember seeing any manufacturers markings) and where,
I'll have to defer to others. What surprised about it is that outside
of a neighbor or two to have experienced the same thing renovating
their houses, nobody I've talked to (including contractors) has ever
seen the stuff themselves. So I'm wondering if it was a regional
thing in the northeast, or of this would have been a nationwide
product being shuttled around in a myriad of otherwise unremarkable
boxcars?

Tim Barney

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Don Worthy <don_worthy@...> wrote:

Hey fellows, I didn't think that "sheetrock" was around in the 40s
or even the early 50s. Here in the south, homes were still using the
plastered walls and ceilings. Also, during the 50s many homes and
company buildings were using beautiful "real" wood paneling.
So, I'm wondering "when" did "sheetrock" become a wide spread
product?? I have a feeling that it came around in the 60s. I know the
Kaolin companies made big advances in their field and Kaolin (chalk)
is 90% of sheetrock.
Don Worthy

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "espeeac12" <milesinniles@>
wrote:

How was Sheetrock (Drywall) Originally shipped by rail? When? I'm
going
to have a couple of sheetrock loads for my late 1940's-1959 era
layout.
Does anyone show pictures of this early operation? How was it
unloaded?
In boxcars, at least prior to WWII, when my dad was working as a
driver and yardman for various lumber yards in Chicago. The transition
to bulkhead flats came after the war, when plastic wrapping technology
advanced to the point where this moisture sensitive load could be
protected. When I see Dad later this week, I'll ask him when he saw
the first bulkhead flats.

Dennis






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Re: Backdating Mather Proto PH&D

red_gate_rover
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...>
wrote:


Hard to say in the absence of photos from the era you model. However,
later photos of the cars all show them to be mineral red. And the RPI
site, though sometimes useful, is far from being a paragon of accuracy.
Thank you again. I should have written beige and not tan. The
reference is from a 1991 article in RMC that I must have but have not
yet found the right box. I'm finding the RPI site to be useful but
often too sketchy and raising more questions. It's still great place
to start. -Jim Pasquill


Re: Athearn C&NW 65 ft mill gon

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Apr 18, 2007, at 9:15 AM, Mike Brock wrote:

I note that Athearn is producing a C&NW version of the 65 ft mill gon.
I
also note that the Athearn numbers:

Gondola, C&NW #95081 & 95156

do not match the numbers Richard reports in his article in Feb 2006
RMJ nor
do they match those in the '53 ORER [ which match Richard's ]. The
Athearn
cars also have a '58 [ I think ] built date. Rather annoying for those
modeling the steam era. I suppose one could change the numbers. Does
anyone
know if these cars are correct for the late steam era? Wonder why
Athearn
chose such a date...shutting out the transition era modeler?
My 10/58 ORER shows two groups of 65'6" mill gons with numbers in the
95000-95199 series and odd numbers in the 132001-132099 series. The
132000 series cars were built by Pressed Steel in 1949 and had those
numbers from the outset, as shown by a builder's photo in the 1953 Car
Builders' Cyclopedia, confirmed by the 1951 C&NW diagram book. The
95000-95199 series cars are not in the 1/53 or 1/55 ORERs, so the built
date on the Athearn models may be correct. Changing the numbers is, of
course, possible but the rest of the lettering should be compared to
the photo in the 1953 Cyc as there is no guarantee that the lettering
style and arrangement was the same on the later cars as on the earlier
ones.

As to why Athearn chose to model the later cars rather than the earlier
ones, I can tell you that they could easily have modeled the 1949 cars
because I provided Athearn's R&D people with both photos and data on
them. However, I will add my impression that product decisions at
Athearn are not made by, nor apparently even in much consultation with,
the R&D department. They are made by sales people. And most sales
people in the model railroad business are legendary for (1) their
ignorance of, even contempt for, accurate prototype data and (2) their
insightful market research, which consists mostly of exchanging
misconceptions with hobby shop owners who know even less about the
prototype than they do. No surprise, then, that the results often seem
baffling to us prototype modelers.

In short, go figure.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Sheetrock by Rail

Jim & Lisa Hayes <jimandlisa97225@...>
 

After all this prototype information, you may want to build a flatcar loaded
with Sheetrock.



Sunshine offers ATSF Ft L & N bulkhead flatcars and wallboard loads for
them. There is a review of them in the December 2005 RMC.



Jim Hayes

Portland Oregon


Re: Backdating Mather Proto PH&D

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Apr 18, 2007, at 3:16 PM, red_gate_rover wrote:

Thanks for the reply. This information at least allows plausibility
to simply replacing the brakes and data, at least until such time as
pictures surface. For my purposes that's good enough. However there
is a suggestions on the RPI site that these cars were painted with a
tan paint and not red. Anyone know more? -Jim Pasquill
Hard to say in the absence of photos from the era you model. However,
later photos of the cars all show them to be mineral red. And the RPI
site, though sometimes useful, is far from being a paragon of accuracy.

Richard Hendrickson

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