Date   

Re: Red Caboose reefer as FGEX 36045

Bruce Smith
 

On Sun, January 28, 2007 1:05 pm, Don Worthy wrote:
Hello group, I've bought a Red Caboose woodside reefer in the FGEX
lettering with number 36045.
Is this car correct, close or flat out wrong?
Don,

Flat out wrong.

Right this instant, your best bet for FGEX woodies are Sunshine's resin
kits. In addition, you can modify the Accurail reefer to represent a
small protion of the fleet. Intermountain has been "on the verge" of
releasing a post war rebuilt FGEX woodie for a while now.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: What type of cars to ship asbestos, mineral wool, and starch?

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: tgregmrtn@aol.com

fleeta@verizon.net writes:
Does anyone know what types of cars would've been used to ship these items in the late '50's?

What era are we talking about? You are not clear...

Late _19_ 50's.

Thanks,
KL


SAL DD box cars

Fred Mullins
 

Folks,
I would like to add some SAL 40ft double door box cars to my fleet
of frt cars. What models in HO scale would best be used to model the
AF2 & AF3 cars? Also are there any decals suited for these cars available?
Thanks for any help!
Fred Mullins


What type of cars to ship asbestos, mineral wool, and starch?

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

There is a ceiling tile factory on my layout and currently tiles are made from mineral wool bound with starch or another adhesive. Fifty years ago asbestos was also used. Does anyone know what types of cars would've been used to ship these items in the late '50's? I saw a WW II ad showing asbestos being shipped in bags like cement, so this would probably be in a boxcar. I'm supposing mineral wool would be similar. Could either of these be carried in bulk somehow, either in a covered hopper or in a boxcar like grain? (Ecch.) How about in solution via tank car? Starch could be shipped dry - bagged as well or in an Airslide covered hopper - but there were also Union Starch (USTX) tank cars, so perhaps the common method was in solution?

Thanks,
KL


Red Caboose reefer as FGEX 36045

Don Worthy
 

Hello group, I've bought a Red Caboose woodside reefer in the FGEX
lettering with number 36045.
Is this car correct, close or flat out wrong? I did think that the FGEX
wood cars had either the fishbelly underframe or truss-rods.
Can someone help? The few photos that I've seen in the books and the
Vol 1 of the Prototype modeler that I have, all have fishbelly
underframes.
Thank you to anyone willing to help

Don Worthy
Ivey, Ga.


Re: Most common user of ACF Type 21 and Type 27 tank cars?

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

I'm thinking it might be Shipper's Car Line in SHPX marks. Has anyone ever racked out the common types vs. users? I realize that the variety was staggering and the data is not but hopefully there is something to be learned beyond "The most common tank car was a UTLX 8000 gallon unpressurized, uninsulated", perhaps the second through fifth most common? How about types vs. time?

Thanks,
KL


Re: MOW book

MOFWCABOOSE@...
 

The book covers the subject of nonrevenue equipment in general and is not
specific to any one railroad, so there are some pictures of Canadian rolling
stock, and the paint/lettering section discusses CNR and CPR along with other
major railroads.

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL


Freight car modeler breakfast before Timonium

lnbill <bwelch@...>
 

Would anyone like to join me for breakfast next Saturday, Feb. 3 at the
IHOP in Timonium at 8 AM before the show opens at 9 AM?

Bill Welch


Timonium Train Show - Model Railroad Open House

James F. Brewer <jfbrewer@...>
 

I will be hosting an open house of my model railroad following the train show at Timonium on Saturday, February 3, 2007, from 6-11 p.m. I will have a table at the show, probably sandwiched between the N&WHS and the Springhaven Shops tables. I will have directions for those who need them.

If you want to order any kits for pickup at the show, please let me know by Friday, February 2.

If you are not attending the show, but would like to stop over to see the layout Saturday evening, please contact me off list at jfbrewer@comcast.net for directions.

Jim Brewer
Pocahontas Models LLC
www.pocahontasmodels.com


Re: What type of cars to ship asbestos, mineral wool, and starch?

Greg Martin
 

In a message dated 1/28/2007 11:47:28 A.M. Pacific Standard Time,
fleeta@verizon.net writes:

There is a ceiling tile factory on my layout and currently tiles are made
from mineral wool bound with starch or another adhesive. Fifty years ago
asbestos was also used. Does anyone know what types of cars would've been used to
ship these items in the late '50's? I saw a WW II ad showing asbestos being
shipped in bags like cement, so this would probably be in a boxcar. I'm
supposing mineral wool would be similar. Could either of these be carried in bulk
somehow, either in a covered hopper or in a boxcar like grain? (Ecch.) How
about in solution via tank car? Starch could be shipped dry - bagged as well or
in an Airslide covered hopper - but there were also Union Starch (USTX) tank
cars, so perhaps the common method was in solution?

Thanks,
KL



KL

What era are we talking about? You are not clear... Wool was shipped in
bales, generally wrapped in burlap, like hops or cotton except somewhat square
and an tall, say 2'x 2'x 6' and stacked with a bale squeeze on a fork lift.
Yes, asbestos was "bagged" in sacks that could be handled with forklifts, again
depending on the era. I am not familiar with starch but today it could be
shipped in bags as well likened to gypsum and anthracite coal (used for
filtration in lieu of charcoal) in "super sacks"... that have straps that can be
handled with fork lifts as well. Today each sack contains about 2,00 pounds of
material and are stacked in a boxcar. So the answer is boxcars not covered
hoppers. Think inventory control...


Greg Martin


Re: Air hose bracket and air hose part

Greg Martin
 

In a message dated 1/27/2007 8:21:41 A.M. Pacific Standard Time,
ljack70117@adelphia.net writes:

Gentlemen
The mold is being cut as I write this for an injection molded part.
They can be converted to brass by the investment casting process.
I have one question for all of you who are writing to the list. Shell
I continue with the project or do you want me to stop and allow you
to continue you interests?
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton F


Larry,

Don't stop here tool us a "bundle set" for steam and signal lines for
passenger cars as well. This market is hot and looks as if it is going to continue
to grow. Thing a flexible plastic WITH HOSES!

Thanks again

Greg Martin


Re: Air hose bracket and air hose part

Greg Martin
 

In a message dated 1/27/2007 8:21:41 A.M. Pacific Standard Time,
ljack70117@adelphia.net writes:

Gentlemen
The mold is being cut as I write this for an injection molded part.
They can be converted to brass by the investment casting process.
I have one question for all of you who are writing to the list. Shell
I continue with the project or do you want me to stop and allow you
to continue you interests?
Thank you
Larry Jackman


Larry,

Don't mess around give us the hose as well... If some don't want it let them
eBay them... The rest of the world doesn't want to make a bunch of trips to
the hobby shop for, " Hoses? Hoses? now I need some stinking hoses"...

Greg Martin


Re: Air hose bracket and air hose part

Greg Martin
 

In a message dated 1/27/2007 8:21:41 A.M. Pacific Standard Time,
ljack70117@adelphia.net writes:

Gentlemen
The mold is being cut as I write this for an injection molded part.
They can be converted to brass by the investment casting process.
I have one question for all of you who are writing to the list. Shell
I continue with the project or do you want me to stop and allow you
to continue you interests?
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL



Larry,

Quite frankly, I would think that a good mold for an engineering plastic
would work just fine. Just make the tool big enough so that we can do say 6 cars
with one package, more is better.

Thanks,

Greg Martin


PRR Class S2 (was PRR Class S1)

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Jack Van Buekenhout asked:
"Is there a Pennsylvania locomotive with a wheel arrangment of 6-4-4-6?"

I replied:
Yes - PRR 6100, the Class S1 steam turbine:
http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-s6100ahn.jpg
http://www.steamlocomotive.com/streamlined/scrapped/prr6100.jpg

Should know better to answer before my first cup of coffee - the Class
S1 6-4-4-6 was a duplex; PRR 6200, Class S2, was the 6-8-6 steam
turbine.
http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-s6200bhn.jpg


Ben Hom


PRR Class S1 (was Pennsy Aficianados)

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Jack Van Buekenhout asked:
"Is there a Pennsylvania locomotive with a wheel arrangment of 6-4-4-6?"

Yes - PRR 6100, the Class S1 steam turbine:
http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-s6100ahn.jpg

This is off-topic for this list - recommend you continue discussions on
one of the PRR lists:
PRR-FAX: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PRR
Keystone Crossings: http://lists.dsop.com/prr/


Ben Hom


Re: Air hose bracket and air hose part

ljack70117@...
 

Not really. We had this very large Crane. After we finished we took it a part and buried it in the desert and let you guys wonder about how we did it.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@adelphia.net
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left

On Jan 27, 2007, at 9:42 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

Schuyler Larrabee wrote:
The lever formed by the hose may not be long, but lever action is
very strong.
Yup. I think that's how they built the pyramids <g>.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history




Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: Air hose bracket and air hose part

Joseph Binish <joebinish@...>
 

Larry,
Pin or hole, either way. A metal pin added by the modeler, while another step, would be "stronger". We are playing here, and sometimes toys break! The +/- 1/16th is a good distance, I think. Gives enough meat for the hole to be drilled into the end, hence a stronger joint.
Joe Binish

----- Original Message -----
From: ljack70117@adelphia.net
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, January 27, 2007 1:24 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Air hose bracket and air hose part


Suggestion: I do not furnish the pin but put a .020" hole in it and
you can cut some brass or steel wire to use.
I do not think a plastic molded would work. No strength.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@adelphia.net
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left

On Jan 27, 2007, at 3:38 PM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

> I had not thought about the idea of a mounting pin, but I like it.
> It should be maybe 3/32" to 1/8"
> long, which is kind of long, but it's much easier to cut something
> shorter than to cut it longer.
> It should also be off the top of the part of the bracket which is
> applied to the underside of the
> floor, so it can fit into a hole drilled into the floor to receive
> it. Others might have a notion
> of what diameter for the pin, and therefore drill size for the
> receiving hole, would be good. It
> probably also ought to be 1/16" back from the end face of the car,
> so as to have a significant
> amount of "meat" in the car's material that it will not break off
> by breaking through the car's end.
> The lever formed by the hose may not be long, but lever action is
> very strong.
>
> SGL
>


Re: Air hose bracket and air hose part

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Schuyler Larrabee wrote:
The lever formed by the hose may not be long, but lever action is
very strong.
Yup. I think that's how they built the pyramids <g>.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: CB&Q 70-ton triple hoppers

Rupert & Maureen <gamlenz@...>
 

Jerry

The photo of 170494 shown in Bulletin #35 is also shown more clearly (still B&W) in the Burlington Route H. S. Data Sheet on 70 ton hoppers. The text states that they were equipped with roller bearing journals in standard friction bearing journal boxes with lids. The lettering was identical to that applied to the rest of the HT-10's except it was black lettering instead of white, with additional lettering below the herald of "TIMKEN - ROLLER - BEARINGS", "GREASE - LUBRICATION" and "AS PER INSTRUCTIONS"

When they required repainting (after at least 10 years service), they received the standard paint scheme of the day but without the special lettering as roller bearings were common by then.

I can send you a scan off List if that would assist.

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ

----- Original Message -----
From: <asychis@aol.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, January 28, 2007 4:51 AM
Subject: [STMFC] CB&Q 70-ton triple hoppers


Hi Guys,

I am interested in finding information and possibly a photo or two of CB&Q
70-ton triple hoppers 170490-170499, built at Havelock in 1949. These were
the last 10 in a group of 500 HT-10 hoppers. They were built with roller
bearing trucks and painted orange with blakc lettering to differentiate them from
the other 490 cars (at least that's what it says in Burlington Bulletin 35,
"The Q in the Coal Fields").

Thanks for any help on this subject.

Jerry Michels


Re: Air hose bracket and air hose part

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Well, that'd be OK, I guess, but it's one more thing that has to be done when you're building the
model. Actually, molded pins like this work very well, as they provide surfaces that will resist
separating in more directions. There are a number of parts on the market that have such pins, in
plastic. Also, if you have (or make) a hole to mount the part in, the part gets located by the hole
and pin, and it makes it so you don't have to hold the @%()&(& thing in exactly the right place
until the glue dries. This time is a well-known demonstration of the fact that time slows down in
certain circumstances, though seldom written up in physics texts. ;^)

As Brian said, we're very pleased that you're doing this part.

SGL

Suggestion: I do not furnish the pin but put a .020" hole in it and
you can cut some brass or steel wire to use.
I do not think a plastic molded would work. No strength.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@adelphia.net <mailto:ljack70117%40adelphia.net>
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left

On Jan 27, 2007, at 3:38 PM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

I had not thought about the idea of a mounting pin, but I like it.
It should be maybe 3/32" to 1/8"
long, which is kind of long, but it's much easier to cut something
shorter than to cut it longer.
It should also be off the top of the part of the bracket which is
applied to the underside of the
floor, so it can fit into a hole drilled into the floor to receive
it. Others might have a notion
of what diameter for the pin, and therefore drill size for the
receiving hole, would be good. It
probably also ought to be 1/16" back from the end face of the car,
so as to have a significant
amount of "meat" in the car's material that it will not break off
by breaking through the car's end.
The lever formed by the hose may not be long, but lever action is
very strong.

SGL



125741 - 125760 of 185178