Date   

Re: Photo of R-40-25 (was another PFE Reefer)

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Bruce Smith wrote:


On Apr 5, 2006, at 12:53 PM, David Smith wrote:

What is the significance of the white stencil on the left side, which
appears to say "PFE Heated (heater?) Storage"?
Oh, and notice how dirty that reefer is? PFE used to wash their reefers on every trip, or nearly so. In the late 1950's the president of the operation halted all washing and their cars started looking a tad ratty!
Bruce,

You might want to duck for cover before Berkeley pounces. Your favorite road was not noted for washing its equipment.

Tim Gilbert


Re: Resin Casting Question

Charles Morrill <badlands@...>
 

Hi Andy,
The problem I had with stretching the RTV volume with chunks of old RTV was exactly what you described --- trapped air and chunks floating above the pour-line. For my situation at the time, it caused more trouble and labor than the RTV it saved was worth. But, it is a good bit of info to remember where it will have some use.

Regarding platinum vs. tin based RTVs --- I can never keep which is which straight (not unusal problem for me according to my spouse). I think the platinum based is the harder usually white compound mixed 10 parts to 1 part catalyst by weight. The other softer and more fluid compound (the tin based?) is usually green/blue and mixed 1 part A to 1 part B by volume. Is that correct? Anyway, I have used both types and each has its advantages and problems. Lately, I've used the latter mostly because of ease of making small molds quickly, which don't need a long (several years, hundreds of castings) life.

That was a neat trick with the roof extension casting. I want to remember that one.
Charlie

----- Original Message -----
From: "Andy Carlson" <midcentury@sbcglobal.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2006 11:30 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Resin Casting Question


Boy, is Charles ever right about discovering new
tricks when working with molding and casting. Starting
with a basic primer for introduction, most STMFC
modelers will build up a huge bag of tricks,
especially if one is to experiment.

One thing though, I did not have Charles' problems in
stretching mold pouring supplies with additions of
previously cured RTV. My frequent results indicate
that same brand RTV chunks added to the uncured RTV
seemed to have NO chemical deleterious effects. You do
have to be careful about chunks erupting above the top
of the pour-line, but this can be controlled by using
smaller chunks. Also, take care about introducing
trapped air to the mold. I have even used 2nd
generation chunks with no-ill effects. My experience
has shown that this works with all of the Platinum
based RTVs I have used, this was untested on Tin based
RTVs, which I do not recommend at all for the hobbyist
mold maker in that molds made from them deteriorate
rapidly on the shelf.

I will further discourage using chunks of cured resin
in the casting process, for no other reason little
economy is offered as resin is pretty inexpensive. I
have experimented with making a 50' roof from a mold
for a 40' roof. I took a cured casting of a 40' roof,
cut it in half (randomly) and placed both pieces of
the 40' roof spaced with about a 10' gap back into to
mold where I had curled the ends of the mold down to
allow the roof pieces to remain straight. I poured
fresh resin into the the mold in the space between
roof sections, and allowed to cure. Resin bonds
extremely well to its cured self. I made a 3/3 IDE end
into a 4/4 IDE w/o any sanding or precision cutting. A
real cool use of Resin's properties!
-Andy Carlson

--- Charles Morrill <badlands@nts-online.net> wrote:

I found a similar result when I tried to
stretch the RTV volume by
adding old RTV chunks to the liquid.

I am still learning and discovering new tricks to
this casting model parts.
It is really worth while to add the process to your
model building tool kit.
Charlie






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Re: Resin Casting Question

Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

I added ground-up pieces of old molds to new RTV for awhile but gave it up because too many molds had defects on the smooth surfaces of car sides - it looked like teenage zits. - Al Westerfield

----- Original Message -----
From: Andy Carlson
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2006 11:30 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Resin Casting Question


One thing though, I did not have Charles' problems in
stretching mold pouring supplies with additions of
previously cured RTV. My frequent results indicate
that same brand RTV chunks added to the uncured RTV
seemed to have NO chemical deleterious effects.


Re: Kadee's new offset twin hopper

Ed Hawkins
 

On Wednesday, April 5, 2006, at 12:26 PM, jim_mischke wrote:

Thank you, Ed.

Are the new Kadee offest side twin hopper cars good for Reading
classes HTa, HTb, or HTc?  All three?

Reason I ask is that these Reading cars were very common on the B&O
in the 1950's, B&O even picked up over 2000 of them during 1964-
1966, including road numbers B&O 234000-235999.
Jim,
The model's "good" for all of Reading's AAR 50-ton hoppers as long as
you don't mind having some of the side stake angles oriented in a
different direction. However, the classes on the photos of the cars I
have are HTT, HTU, and HTV (series 81000-87999, not inclusive) built by
Bethlehem Steel Co. from 1948 to 1957.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: branded quality drill bits

eabracher@...
 

In a message dated 4/5/06 6:21:40 PM, atkott@swbell.net writes:



Larry is correct in his comments about small drills.  You cannot
beat an Albrecht #15-JO precision chuck on a Cameron drill press for
small hole drilling.  The 15-JO chuck will close down on a drill
from 0.001" to 1/16" maximum!  Nice German engineering!  The Cameron
drill press has bronze bushings - the best for eliminating any
spindle wobble. 
I have one of these that I have used for over 30 years and it is still going
strong. Highly recomend it even at the cost.

eric


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: PFE reefer error

Jim and Lisa Hayes <jimandlisa97225@...>
 

It's from the 1953 Car Builder's Cyclopedia.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon


Re: branded quality drill bits

ljack70117@...
 

see below.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net



On Apr 5, 2006, at 11:19 AM, Ned Carey wrote:

I'd add that Small Parts has HSS drills down to #97
I ordered a number of their small drill bits. I had to return them. Most small bits #80+ have a standard size shaft like .100"
Bits with the larger shanks are not standard. A shank on a standard drill bit is .001" smaller than the point dia. The drills you are talking are screw machine drill.
Why do you not buy a good drill chuck and protect it from side pressure so it will stay true. One such chuck is made by Albrecht. Get their keyless model. How fast do you run you little drills? This chuck will handle 50,000 RPM.
You will never drill a true hole with a twist drill anyway. They are incapable of doing it. They always walk sideways no mater how care you try to be.

so they are easy to chuck or put in a standard machine collet. They Small Parts bits did not have a standard shaft so your had to chuck up a .006" bit!

On my mill, I want to use a collet on something that small for more precision. Without an oversize shaft it was impossible.

Ned Carey





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Re: Kadee's new offset twin hopper

jim_mischke <jmischke@...>
 

Thank you, Ed.

Are the new Kadee offest side twin hopper cars good for Reading
classes HTa, HTb, or HTc? All three?

Reason I ask is that these Reading cars were very common on the B&O
in the 1950's, B&O even picked up over 2000 of them during 1964-
1966, including road numbers B&O 234000-235999.




--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Ed Hawkins <hawk0621@...> wrote:


On Monday, April 3, 2006, at 11:20 AM, jim_mischke wrote:

What road names are the new Kadee offset side twin hoppers
accurate
for??
Jim,
The model is reasonably accurate for Alton (later to GM&O), ATSF,
C&EI,
C&I, CG, CIL, D&H, GA, GM&O, MILW, NC&StL, NS, NYC, RDG, SB, and
SLOF
(later to C&EI). All of these cars had vertical angles supporting
the
ends, which were flat, and side sills that were level from the
bolsters
to the corner posts. As I stated earlier, some cars require some
different door locking mechanisms. There were numerous other roads
having similar, but different versions of AAR 50-ton hopper cars
having
either the ends or side sills of a different arrangement than the
Kadee
model. When I say "reasonably accurate" I'm overlooking some small
details such as the orientation of the angles used for the side
stakes,
which weren't always the same configuration.

Accurate models for many other prototype cars could be produced if
other end arrangements were to be tooled. This includes a
substantial
number of prototype cars using Z-sections supporting the ends such
as
those used by B&O (N-41 and N-44 cars), CRP/CNJ, LNE, and P&S. Sam
Clarke of Kadee might want to comment on this, but it's my current
understanding that Kadee is not considering other end arrangements
at
this time. Highly accurate cars for the previously mentioned roads
and
others having heap shields could be made if the tooling expense
for the
other end arrangements was to be substantiated (perhaps as special
projects with historical societies or similar organizations).

One of the more prominent roads that has been discussed is the
L&N,
whose cars either had a different side sill arrangement (for their
cars
with flat ends) or heap shields and thus the Kadee model does not
match
L&N's prototype cars. The article I've prepared for RMJ will
discuss
the various differences in the AAR design and will provide a
roster and
photos of most cars above that generally match the Kadee model.
Nearly
all of these photos have previously been published in RP CYC
(Volumes
1, 2, 4, 8, 9, and 13) and they are of larger format than will
likely
be seen in RMJ.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: PFE reefer error

Tim O'Connor
 

Jim I don't have the book with me, but is that a real PFE drawing, or
a drawing from a publication like Model Railroader or Mainline Modeler?
It's unfortunately common to find errors in hobby drawings. Just ask
Bill Schneider!

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: "Jim and Lisa Hayes" <jimandlisa97225@verizon.net>
It looks to me like PFE was the one who made the error. They didn't follow
their own plan. On page 184 (1st printing) of Tony's PFE book is a plan
drawing of the R-40-26. The end shown in that drawing looks like the one
used for the Intermountain and Sunshine models. But photos of the real thing
show that PFE changed their mind.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon


Re: Photo of R-40-25 (was another PFE Reefer)

Bruce Smith
 

On Apr 5, 2006, at 12:53 PM, David Smith wrote:

What is the significance of the white stencil on the left side, which
appears to say "PFE Heated (heater?) Storage"?
Oh, and notice how dirty that reefer is? PFE used to wash their reefers on every trip, or nearly so. In the late 1950's the president of the operation halted all washing and their cars started looking a tad ratty!
-Bruce


Re: PFE reefer error

Jim and Lisa Hayes <jimandlisa97225@...>
 

It looks to me like PFE was the one who made the error. They didn't follow
their own plan. On page 184 (1st printing) of Tony's PFE book is a plan
drawing of the R-40-26. The end shown in that drawing looks like the one
used for the Intermountain and Sunshine models. But photos of the real thing
show that PFE changed their mind.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon


Re: Photo of R-40-25 (was another PFE Reefer)

David Smith <dsmith@...>
 

What is the significance of the white stencil on the left side, which
appears to say "PFE Heated (heater?) Storage"?

I have included a link to a color photo of a R-40-25.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


http://www.geocities.com/oldlahistory/pfe4537.jpg




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Re: Resin Casting Question

Andy Carlson
 

Boy, is Charles ever right about discovering new
tricks when working with molding and casting. Starting
with a basic primer for introduction, most STMFC
modelers will build up a huge bag of tricks,
especially if one is to experiment.

One thing though, I did not have Charles' problems in
stretching mold pouring supplies with additions of
previously cured RTV. My frequent results indicate
that same brand RTV chunks added to the uncured RTV
seemed to have NO chemical deleterious effects. You do
have to be careful about chunks erupting above the top
of the pour-line, but this can be controlled by using
smaller chunks. Also, take care about introducing
trapped air to the mold. I have even used 2nd
generation chunks with no-ill effects. My experience
has shown that this works with all of the Platinum
based RTVs I have used, this was untested on Tin based
RTVs, which I do not recommend at all for the hobbyist
mold maker in that molds made from them deteriorate
rapidly on the shelf.

I will further discourage using chunks of cured resin
in the casting process, for no other reason little
economy is offered as resin is pretty inexpensive. I
have experimented with making a 50' roof from a mold
for a 40' roof. I took a cured casting of a 40' roof,
cut it in half (randomly) and placed both pieces of
the 40' roof spaced with about a 10' gap back into to
mold where I had curled the ends of the mold down to
allow the roof pieces to remain straight. I poured
fresh resin into the the mold in the space between
roof sections, and allowed to cure. Resin bonds
extremely well to its cured self. I made a 3/3 IDE end
into a 4/4 IDE w/o any sanding or precision cutting. A
real cool use of Resin's properties!
-Andy Carlson

--- Charles Morrill <badlands@nts-online.net> wrote:

I found a similar result when I tried to

stretch the RTV volume by
adding old RTV chunks to the liquid.

I am still learning and discovering new tricks to
this casting model parts.
It is really worth while to add the process to your
model building tool kit.
Charlie






Yahoo! Groups Links


STMFC-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com






Re: Resin Casting Question

buchwaldfam <duff@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Charles Morrill" <badlands@...> wrote:
See Micro Mark or Bragdon Interprises for small quantity RTV and
resin
supplies. Do order the smallest quantities as this stuff has
limited shelf
life.
Like I wrote before, I used the blue RTV mold resin from
Micro Mark with very good results.
The Urethane parts resin didn't work out so well, and I used
Smooth-On brand (From a place called "The Compleat Sculptor"),
which worked very well... and makes a neat squeaking sound
when you run an Xacto blade through it!


However, I would avoid putting loose scrap resin castings into a
mold. They are likely to interfere with flow of the liquid
resin. Plus any
mold release or other contaniments on the old castings would
probably cause
trouble. I found a similar result when I tried to stretch the RTV
volume by
adding old RTV chunks to the liquid.
Plus, there wasn't any old resin scraps available: all the
little hockey puck shaped exact replicas of the
inside of a Solo plastic cup went like hot cakes among the
guys at work!

Regards,
Phil Buchwald


Re: Photo of R-40-25 (was another PFE Reefer)

espeefan@juno.com <espeefan@...>
 

Yes.
The ends on all the -26's are the same, just like the -25's.
Sincerely,
Dan Smith.


Re: Resin Casting Question

Charles Morrill <badlands@...>
 

Gene,
I'll throw in my .01 cents worth here ---

Is the rubber you use available in the small quantities that a duffer
like me would want? What brand or part number?

For someone like myself not engaged in commercial production just
getting a few castings per mold wouldn't be much of a problem.
See Micro Mark or Bragdon Interprises for small quantity RTV and resin supplies. Do order the smallest quantities as this stuff has limited shelf life. Also, Bragdon has an excellent video "RTV Mold Making and Resin Casting For The Model Maker". www.bragdonent.com

RE your last sentence: Would consistent shrinkage (perhaps expressed
as a per cent or ratio) mean that if the full sized masters fit
together properly, then the slightly smaller parts would also fit
each other?
A few years ago, I made a series of O scale caboose bodies complete with interiors from resin. The total shrinkage in length for a side (8 1/2" long) was 1/32" measured against the original pattern. Since the sides, ends, roof, and floor were molded and cast from the same materials, the fit of the parts was the same as the original styrene patterns. The RTV and resin came from Micro Mark.

Would a large part with a greater volume shrink more (again as a per
cent or ratio) than a thin or small part? What I have in mind here
are those dimples we see on the larger parts of some plastic models.
I've cast parts 1/64" thick to 1" thick and never had a "dimple" shrink unless the mold leaked out the bottom.

Could some solid material be embedded in parts of a large volume to
reduce the amount of liquid resin so that there would be less
shrinkage? Would defective castings, flash, scraps and leftovers led
themselves to 'stretching' the liquid resin? Does fresh liquid resin
adhere well to previously cured resin?
For some of the signal parts I cast, I imbed brass tubes without any problem. However, I would avoid putting loose scrap resin castings into a mold. They are likely to interfere with flow of the liquid resin. Plus any mold release or other contaniments on the old castings would probably cause trouble. I found a similar result when I tried to stretch the RTV volume by adding old RTV chunks to the liquid.

I am still learning and discovering new tricks to this casting model parts. It is really worth while to add the process to your model building tool kit.
Charlie


Re: branded quality drill bits

Ned Carey <nedspam@...>
 

I'd add that Small Parts has HSS drills down to #97
I ordered a number of their small drill bits. I had to return them. Most small bits #80+ have a standard size shaft like .100" so they are easy to chuck or put in a standard machine collet. They Small Parts bits did not have a standard shaft so your had to chuck up a .006" bit!

On my mill, I want to use a collet on something that small for more precision. Without an oversize shaft it was impossible.

Ned Carey


My take on Modeler's Guide to Steel Boxcars- MR

Milepost 131 <mp131@...>
 

I read the article. Quite honestly, it was one of the better articles that
MR has published in recent memory. It provides general technical information
(enough to whet the appetite of some and to pique the curiosity of others.
Does it provide enough for some (like the participants of this group)? No
but that is one of the reasons this group exists. Right?

MR walks a thin line. It tries to appeal to the broadest group of model
railroaders and that includes new folks, all scales, and some of us who will
die with an Xacto blade in our hand. They try to sell magazines and
advertising and have been doing that since 1934. My collection goes back
into the mid-sixties which says something for their approach.

Congrats to the staff for taking a stab in "our direction" a real TEST would
be for them to mention the STMFC group and see whether our ranks swell with
people looking for real technical info! Beware this is a double edged sword
too! Lots of newbie folks asking questions. Maybe we need to consider some
really good FAQ sheets in the archives rather than answering the same
questions again and again and again.


Gordon Andrews

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Re: Modeler's Guide to Steel Boxcars (or "Boxcars for Dummies")

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Miller, Andrew S. wrote:

At least it may serve the very useful purpose of dispelling the myth
among the fellaheen that all steam era box cars are Athearn box cars.

regards,

Andy Miller
My reference in the STMFC to the article as "Boxcars for Dummies" was to the series of "(subject)... for Dummies" books which can be excellent introductions to subjects by explaining the nuances and reducing the trepitations. In my opinion, the reference was positive as an introduction, but may be less than positive to those a lot sophisticated in the nuances of boxcar design and utilization as members of the STMFC are.

MR's audience is deemed by its Editors, Publishers and Marketeers to be novices. At some point, either those novices become disinterested, or they want to become more sophisticated. The article was meant to introduce the novice to the sophistication of boxcars in the steam era. In my opinion at this point, it succeeded in its purpose. What the follow up in future MR issues, however, is unknown. Hopefully, the Editors will be bombarded with favorable responses which will show them and the marketing people that there is interest in sophisticated topics, and where the interest is, the money should flow.

Tim Gilbert


-----Original Message-----

Rich,

Further to Brian Carlson's comments, Tony Koester's MR article could
have been sub-titled "Boxcars for Dummies" which was probably Tony's (&

MR's) intention with its publication. After all, when I first bought a
computer, I bought the book "Computers for Dummies" to alleviate some
of
the mystery.

Perhaps, the article will encourage many of MR's readers to become more

interested in the intricacies of boxcar design and whether a specific
model and/or reporting mark would be appropriate for his layout. Who
knows - some may even join the STMFC.

Tim Gilbert


Re: Out of era stuff at NS (was:Kadee's new offset twin hopper)

Miller, Andrew S. <asmiller@...>
 

Sorry, those were supposed to be SDP69MACPDQs, not SPD69MACPDQs. I
always get that modrin stuff confused ;-)

regards,

Andy Miller

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Miller, Andrew S.
Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2006 8:37 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Out of era stuff at NS (was:Kadee's new offset twin
hopper)

Jeff,

The NS Club is reworking its rolling stock and loco roster into the
transition era. We had previously modeled the 60s-70s. However, what
you undoubtedly saw was private members equipment. Members are
allowed to operate their equipment on the railroad any time
construction does not take priority, and are usually welcome to enter
"extras" into the op sessions. As a result it is not at all uncommon
on a Thursday night to see a PRR freight of mine with a J1 at the head
of 50 steam era freight cars passing a CSX train of double stacks
pulled by a brace of SPD69MACPDQs or whatever. But the Club's own
equipment is trying to adhere to the desired period.


regards,

Andy Miller

132701 - 132720 of 186049