Date   

Re: Kits

Charlie Vlk
 

What evidence does anyone have for the "fall-off in interest in model RRing among the next generations"?
There is no such evidence that I know of. The readership of one magazine and the membership of the NMRA are not indicators of anything except what they are.
Check with Atlas and see how their track sales are going or with Woodland Scenics to see how many bags of ground-up walnut shells / foam they are selling.
The Hobby of Model Railroading is doing just fine in spite of changes in the general population.
I'd wager that there are more people coming into the Hobby then ever before in its history.... and that there is more ACTIVITY in the Hobby with more miles of track in operation than ever.
Charlie Vlk

The lack of exposure to real trains is indeed the primary cause of the
fall-off in interest in model RRing among the next generations.


Re: Kits

Miller, Andrew S. <asmiller@...>
 

Tim,

For some reason kit-building has never seemed to appeal to girls as a
hobby. Yes, you can find the exceptions, but by and large it was boys
who built model airplanes, cars, and yes, trains.

The lack of exposure to real trains is indeed the primary cause of the
fall-off in interest in model RRing among the next generations. A the
annual Freshman Midway at MIT, the Tech Model RR Club has a table at
which we try to lure new members in. We regularly get signs of
amazement from incoming freshman who were unaware there are any trains
left operating in America at all!

I suppose that model Rring is unlike many other markets where teenagers
comprise the largest part of the money spent. The bulk of the money in
model Rring seems to come from the senior crowd, and if they loose the
time, talent, or interest to build the trains themselves, then the
market for kits will shrink appreciably and many manufacturers will
seek business elsewhere. Unfortunately that means the kids who might
grow into the hobby are left without their second tier kits. The first
tier kits are still available from Bowser and Accurail (and to the
degree that they can be found with their new distribution scheme, from
Athearn and MDC). But the next level of kit building is losing many of
its best manufacturers. Yes, Tichy and Branchline are still available,
but I guess I lament the lose of Red Caboose (whose latest kits cost $2
less than a RTR car) and Intermountain (who will offer some of there
cars in an under-only kit version).


What does this have to do with Steam Era freight cars? Well, if the
interest in trains and especially steam era trains, dies with the next
generation, then we all lose, but then again we all will be gone and
not care. So to cover my bets I am Cling you an this directly.


regards,

Andy Miller

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
timboconnor@comcast.net
Sent: Monday, April 10, 2006 1:37 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Kits


Andy

Last time I checked there are still tons of kits available from
Accurail,
Athearn, Branchline, Tichy, resin kit makers, etc. Plus virtually every
kit ever made has an example for sale on Ebay. RTR sells because
most hobbyists have so many unbuilt kits. Interest in models of any
kind stems from exposure in some fashion to the real thing, either
directly or though books or movies or even video games. My girls
like trains and train travel, but I haven't been able to interest them
in building kits. And it's not because I don't have any!

Tim

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: "Miller, Andrew S." <asmiller@mitre.org>

BTW I was talking to the owner of Maine Trains yesterday and he
thinks
the disappearance of kits is one of the reasons so few kids are
interested in the hobby today.


Yahoo! Groups Links


Kts vs. RTR

mrslandser
 

Perhaps there may be an additional factor or two that have not been addressed in the demise of kit building, including age level and MRR enjoyment.

In the first category, I can be the example! LOL I just turned 64 and have neither the eyesight nor the dexterity I had 30 years ago. I still love to build the old Olympic Cascadian kits (and buy everyone I find on Ebay), but they certainly take quite a bit longer than they used to! At the same time, I can find "pre-built kits" on Ebay that fit my RR needs quite well, and in many cases are extremely well-built. Of course, Ebay can be a double-edged sword and like others, I have been "burned" a few times when the quality was less than advertised.

A second factor could be the specific area of interest of the model railroader. I know folks that build kits or scratchbuild cars/structures that do not have a layout nor intend to have a layout. Their enjoyment is the construction. On the other hands there are some who thoroughly enjoy the operational aspect and view buildings, cars, etc. as a means towards operation and do not have the same level of enjoyment in kit building.

Just some "food for thought".

Jack Hanger

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Re: Casting rubbers and resin

Andy Carlson
 

I use a nylon "Artist's Pallet Knife", available at
art supply stores,which when trimmed at the tip to
remove the curvature works really well on chasing all
"innies" which are prone to collecting air bubbles.
This includes door tracks, structural ribs, and the
channels of Youngstown doors. I get close to 100%
usable castings, and w/o vacume. I have never damaged
any mold with this tool. I do polish (smooth) the
tip's edges to remove any risk to the mold.

A Southern California Resin maker has a resin which is
designed to coat a 2-piece mold from the inside, with
out an inner mold, by simply constantly revolving the
mold after the pour to collect resin fairly even
inside the mold. This simplfies casting hollow Tank
Car bodies for small volume casting operations. I
never tried this resin, though I intend to do so
someday when I got to have a circumferential 6 and 8
thousand gallon tank car body.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA
--- lrkdbn <lrkdbn@aol.com> wrote:

Often on "deep"ie.

(.015x.060) recesses such as the flange of a
fishbelly center sill I
will run a fine (.010)wire through the recess after
I pour the resin
to tease out any bubbles-do this gently so you don't
damage the
mold.On the average thin parts such as are used on
an HO boxcar you
have several minutes before the resin becomes to
thick to do this. I
am still trying to get my nerve up to try a 2- piece
mold for a tank
car tank- I think a massive casting such as that
would set up a lot
quicker than thin flat ones.


Re: Kits (was: New stuff)

Andy Carlson
 

It is really interesting looking back at the
prevailing attitude expressed on this list about 4
years ago when we were all lamenting the sinking state
of ship that was Kit building. We seemed to be of a
consensus that we were different from the Hobby Store
General customer who only wanted RTR, as we prefered
Kits. Well guess what??? My own limited experience of
selling RR freight cars has shown me that I currently
am selling RTR about 5:1 to kits, and that includes
many who frequent this list. I was very vocal in my
criticism at that time against the RTR trend leaving
us with fewer options in kits, but now I think I
understand that the trend to RTR has reached the
STMFC'ers!!!
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

--- "Miller, Andrew S." <asmiller@mitre.org> wrote:


BTW I was talking to the owner of Maine Trains
yesterday and he thinks
the disappearance of kits is one of the reasons so
few kids are
interested in the hobby today. The kids who enter
the hobby can't
afford the expensive RTR cars, and they are used to
building kit
automobiles and airplanes. For them the hobby IS
kit building.


Re: NMRA calendar

mopacfirst
 

I just looked at the calender this morning. As it happens, it's very
small for a reason. I got out the magnifying glass and figured out a)
it's the Thumbs award, b) this month is April.

Ron Merrick


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, eabracher@... wrote:

Anyone notice the odd loco in the small photo on the month of April
of the
NMRA calendar?

A kit bash of a diesel and steam loco with a colorful paint job.
wonder
what prototype it was?

eric


Re: Casting rubbers and resin

lrkdbn
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Gene Green" <bierglaeser@...> wrote:

Thanks to all who continue to contribute to this very interesting
and, I hope, useful thread.

About the powder, is it difficult to cover the entire mold evenly?

Would one put more than enough powder in, shake it around, and dump
the excess?

Does the powder stay in the mold or come out with the resin casting?

I use talc based baby powder, and I just sprinkle a bit onto the
mold and distribute it with a large artists brush working the brush
vertically to get the powder into the recesses of the mold. Then use
the brush to flick off the excess.I think it is not a good idea to
blow off the excess as your breath contains moisture which the resin
does not like. It is a little bit messy:)but it greatly improves the
castings.The powder comes out in the casting, but unless there is an
excessive amount in the corners or recesses of the mold it has no
effect on the strength or detail of the casting.Often on "deep"ie.
(.015x.060) recesses such as the flange of a fishbelly center sill I
will run a fine (.010)wire through the recess after I pour the resin
to tease out any bubbles-do this gently so you don't damage the
mold.On the average thin parts such as are used on an HO boxcar you
have several minutes before the resin becomes to thick to do this. I
am still trying to get my nerve up to try a 2- piece mold for a tank
car tank- I think a massive casting such as that would set up a lot
quicker than thin flat ones.

Regards,
Larry King <lrkdbn@aol.com>


Re: Oil Companies - Red Star

Louis Adler <lou_adler@...>
 

Jack,
You are correct ... Texaco did sponsor the Milton Berle Show. I don't remember if the show was called the Texaco Star Theatre, but sounds about right. The advertising consisted of 3 or 4 men dressed in Texaco uniforms singing: "We're the men from Texaco; we serve from Maine to Mexico; etc. ...."
Lou Adler

Eva Hanger <mrslandser@yahoo.com> wrote:
I believe that both, at one time or another, were sponsored by Texaco. Seem to recall the Berle show was called the Texaco Star Theatre.

Jack

rrfaned@aol.com wrote:

In a message dated 4/10/2006 8:11:17 A.M. Central Standard Time,
mrslandser@yahoo.com writes:

I cannot tell you the date when Texaco started using the Red Star, but it
was certainly in use by the mid-fifties. The local Texaco had the emblem on
the "banjo" sign on the street corner, and I seem to recall "Uncle Milty"
(Milton Berle) advising his "fans" to look for the men with the Red Star on their
shirts during the same timeframe.

Jack



Was it Uncle Milty? I seemed to remember Ed Wynn wearing a fireman's hat
and promoting Texaco.

Ed Dabler


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Re: Oil Companies - Red Star

mrslandser
 

I believe that both, at one time or another, were sponsored by Texaco. Seem to recall the Berle show was called the Texaco Star Theatre.

Jack

rrfaned@aol.com wrote:

In a message dated 4/10/2006 8:11:17 A.M. Central Standard Time,
mrslandser@yahoo.com writes:

I cannot tell you the date when Texaco started using the Red Star, but it
was certainly in use by the mid-fifties. The local Texaco had the emblem on
the "banjo" sign on the street corner, and I seem to recall "Uncle Milty"
(Milton Berle) advising his "fans" to look for the men with the Red Star on their
shirts during the same timeframe.

Jack



Was it Uncle Milty? I seemed to remember Ed Wynn wearing a fireman's hat
and promoting Texaco.

Ed Dabler






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Re: Oil Companies - Red Star

Dennis Storzek <dstorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Eva Hanger <mrslandser@...> wrote:

I cannot tell you the date when Texaco started using the Red Star,
but it was certainly in use by the mid-fifties. The local Texaco had
the emblem on the "banjo" sign on the street corner, and I seem to
recall "Uncle Milty" (Milton Berle) advising his "fans" to look for
the men with the Red Star on their shirts during the same timeframe.

Jack
"Trust your car to the man who wears the star" was the common radio ad
tag line in the fifties.

Dennis )just old enough to remember) Storzek


Re: oil companies

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

a Google search, the Texas Company in 1911 "purchased from the owner
of the Red Star Petroleum Company, one Mr. Dawkins."
Tim Gilbert
So, Texaco bought a Mr. Dawkins? I thought that was illegal? Thanks,
Tim

For those who are off chasing the red star logo, the Red Star oil
company's emblem was a red star with "Red Star Oil" written in the
center in a dark (black?) color.

Clark Propst


Re: Kits

Tim O'Connor
 

Andy

Last time I checked there are still tons of kits available from Accurail,
Athearn, Branchline, Tichy, resin kit makers, etc. Plus virtually every
kit ever made has an example for sale on Ebay. RTR sells because
most hobbyists have so many unbuilt kits. Interest in models of any
kind stems from exposure in some fashion to the real thing, either
directly or though books or movies or even video games. My girls
like trains and train travel, but I haven't been able to interest them
in building kits. And it's not because I don't have any!

Tim

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: "Miller, Andrew S." <asmiller@mitre.org>

BTW I was talking to the owner of Maine Trains yesterday and he thinks
the disappearance of kits is one of the reasons so few kids are
interested in the hobby today.


Kits (was: New stuff)

Miller, Andrew S. <asmiller@...>
 

Schuyler,

You're not joining the ranks of the "I don't want to build anything"
people - are you? This same $32.95 car is available from Tichy for
$14.50 - Plus a few dollars for decals and paint. Unless you would
really rather pay someone %18+ for the pleasure of building this great
kit for you.

BTW I was talking to the owner of Maine Trains yesterday and he thinks
the disappearance of kits is one of the reasons so few kids are
interested in the hobby today. The kids who enter the hobby can't
afford the expensive RTR cars, and they are used to building kit
automobiles and airplanes. For them the hobby IS kit building. True
they still have entry level kits from Accurail and Bowser, but when
they want to graduate to something better, they find its all RTR and
$30!

regards,

Andy Miller

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Schuyler Larrabee
Sent: Sunday, April 09, 2006 12:27 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] New stuff

Thanks, Greg! And Ben, too!

And since we all model the PRR . . . ;^)

SGL

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of tgregmrtn@aol.com
Sent: Sunday, April 09, 2006 12:16 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] New stuff

Schuyler,

You can trust the PRR units are correct unless they changed
something since Ben Hom went oer it with a fine toothed
comb... He and I even agreed on the color and I think they
did a good job, Marty, was that when you were still there or
was Matt in charge?

Greg Martin


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




Yahoo! Groups Links









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Re: MC & NYC Boxcar Images

Tim O'Connor
 

Wow! And that station mark: KKKEI! If you click on the 150dpi
version you can make out the number on the Wabash box car
too.

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: "Bob Chaparro" <thecitrusbelt@yahoo.com>
The image collection of the Library of Congress' American Memory
collection includes a number of railroad subjects, some of which
come from other collections. However, not all of these railroad
images are located where you would expect.

While I was researching outdoor advertising images I came across a
Duke University image of a Michigan Central boxcar (92497) and a New
York Central boxcar (243614) in a photo dated 1921. The detail is
very good. The image can be seen at:

http://scriptorium.lib.duke.edu/eaa/maxwell/M02/M0239-72dpi.html

Click on the image to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro
Moderator
Citrus Industry Modeling Group
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/citrusmodeling/ and

Model Railroads of Southern California
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Model_Railroads_Of_Southern_California/


Re: Casting rubbers and resin

eabracher@...
 

In a message dated 4/10/06 1:11:58 PM, ljack70117@adelphia.net writes:


shortened. Talc is a rock.
Use Baking soda or corn starch. It will not hurt your body in any way.
Get an old sock. Fill the toe and then tie a knot in the sock so the 
knot is tight against the powder. When using it on your mold slap it 
on the mold  (both halves) if it is a two part mold. Then slap the 
mold halves together. Gives an even spread and all you need in the mold.

Finally, the correct answer.

eric


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


MC & NYC Boxcar Images

Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

The image collection of the Library of Congress' American Memory
collection includes a number of railroad subjects, some of which
come from other collections. However, not all of these railroad
images are located where you would expect.

While I was researching outdoor advertising images I came across a
Duke University image of a Michigan Central boxcar (92497) and a New
York Central boxcar (243614) in a photo dated 1921. The detail is
very good. The image can be seen at:

http://scriptorium.lib.duke.edu/eaa/maxwell/M02/M0239-72dpi.html

Click on the image to enlarge it.

Bob Chaparro
Moderator
Citrus Industry Modeling Group
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/citrusmodeling/ and

Model Railroads of Southern California
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Model_Railroads_Of_Southern_California/


Re: Oil Companies - Red Star

Garth Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Friends,

Why speculate? Go straight to the horse's mouth, so to speak. According to Texaco's official site, the start was introduced in 1903. The familiar red star with a "T" on in the white circle dates from 1936. Try this link for the full story: http://www.texaco.com/sitelets/history/ .

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

A. Premo wrote:

I strongly suspect that the red star dates back to the thirties or early forties.Ed Wynn, the fire chief, was a radio comedian sponsored by Texaco during that period.Armand Premo


Re: Oil Companies - Red Star

armprem
 

I strongly suspect that the red star dates back to the thirties or early forties.Ed Wynn, the fire chief, was a radio comedian sponsored by Texaco during that period.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "Eva Hanger" <mrslandser@yahoo.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, April 10, 2006 9:10 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Oil Companies - Red Star


I cannot tell you the date when Texaco started using the Red Star, but it was certainly in use by the mid-fifties. The local Texaco had the emblem on the "banjo" sign on the street corner, and I seem to recall "Uncle Milty" (Milton Berle) advising his "fans" to look for the men with the Red Star on their shirts during the same timeframe.

Jack

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Oil Companies - Red Star

mrslandser
 

I cannot tell you the date when Texaco started using the Red Star, but it was certainly in use by the mid-fifties. The local Texaco had the emblem on the "banjo" sign on the street corner, and I seem to recall "Uncle Milty" (Milton Berle) advising his "fans" to look for the men with the Red Star on their shirts during the same timeframe.

Jack

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Re: Oil Companies - Red Star

Edward Dabler
 

In a message dated 4/10/2006 8:11:17 A.M. Central Standard Time,
mrslandser@yahoo.com writes:

I cannot tell you the date when Texaco started using the Red Star, but it
was certainly in use by the mid-fifties. The local Texaco had the emblem on
the "banjo" sign on the street corner, and I seem to recall "Uncle Milty"
(Milton Berle) advising his "fans" to look for the men with the Red Star on their
shirts during the same timeframe.

Jack



Was it Uncle Milty? I seemed to remember Ed Wynn wearing a fireman's hat
and promoting Texaco.

Ed Dabler

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