Date   

Re: washing PFE reefers (was something else)

Tim O'Connor
 

Ben, those numbers are interesting, because it sounds like PFE
was washing cars maybe once or twice between repaintings. That
doesn't sound very extravagant to me, but maybe Tony can explain
if there was a practical purpose for occasional washings of wood
cars or if it was just for show? (By the late 40's PFE's fleet of
steel cars had reached over 14,000 cars.)



-------------------
Bruce Smith wrote:
"Oh, and notice how dirty that reefer is? PFE used to wash their
reefers on every trip, or nearly so. In the late 1950's the
president of the operation halted all washing and their cars started
looking a tad ratty!"

Tim Gilbert replied:
"You might want to duck for cover before Berkeley pounces. Your
favorite road was not noted for washing its equipment."
----------------------------------------------------------------

Ben Hom wrote

Neither was anyone else - remember, we're talking about washing
FREIGHT CARS, and PFE was unique in this aspect! As for Tony
jumping in, where do you think Bruce got this information? From p
159 of Thompson/Church/Jones' Pacific Fruit Express:

"In the post-war period, PFE continued to wash car exteriors,
averaging almost 11,000 cars per year during 1945-48. Labor costs
caused washing frequency to decrease sharply in 1949, and remained
at about 2000 cars annually until 1955.


Re: branded quality drill bits

Tony Thompson
 

A.T. Kott wrote:
IMHO, carbide drills are probably inappropriate for
most modeling purposes. They are VERY tough, but also
very brittle
and will easily shatter, particularly when breaking
through a hole.

Just to note, this is NOT the usual definition
of "tough." They are hard and strong, and resist wear,
but are obviously NOT tough.

A.W. Thompson


Re: Replacement of National Type B trucks

Tim O'Connor
 

Chris

I am looking at a 1969 Jim Sands scan of GN 15400, a 40ft double door
box car, with a load limit of 129200 and a light weight of 47800 - for
a total rating of 177000, the nominal standard for a "50 ton" car since
the 1960's. The next higher rating is 220000; it seems unlikely many
postwar AAR 40ft cars received that rating, ever.

I meant to add that GN 15400 has National Type-B trucks.

Tim O'

Mark: I'm curious to see what comes up in response to this question.
But I can offer that the NP Ry had hundreds, possibly thousands of
boxcars and hoppers riding on National B-1 trucks right through the
1960s. Steel AAR-oid boxcars the NP rebuilt in the 1950s-1960s
retained (or possibly acquired) these trucks.
However, it appears cars running on National B-1s were not uprated
from 50 to 55 ton capacity the way many cars with ASF A-3 Ride Control
and certain other nominal 50-ton trucks were in the later 1960s (at
least on the NP).

Chris Frissell
Polson, MT

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Heiden" <mark_heiden@...> wrote:

Hello everyone,

I was looking at pictures of GTW and CB&Q boxcars that were delivered
with National Type B trucks. In these pictures, dated 1964, the Type
B trucks had been replaced with more conventional trucks. Was there a
flaw in the Type B trucks that caused them to be replaced? Would
these trucks still have been found under cars in the late 1950s?


Re: branded quality drill bits

ljack70117@...
 

I agree 100% with this email.
Vermont American tools have always been junk. I have not bought any since the late 1950s.
Also an other tool used by modelers: The Tap I recommend using a two flute gun tap. Used right they do not break. You can find them in your big tool houses.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net

On Apr 5, 2006, at 9:21 PM, proto48er wrote:

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, ljack70117@... wrote:

see below.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@...



On Apr 5, 2006, at 11:19 AM, Ned Carey wrote:

I'd add that Small Parts has HSS drills down to #97
I ordered a number of their small drill bits. I had to return
them.
Most small bits #80+ have a standard size shaft like .100"
Bits with the larger shanks are not standard. A shank on a
standard
drill bit is .001" smaller than the point dia. The drills you
are
talking are screw machine drill.
Why do you not buy a good drill chuck and protect it from side
pressure so it will stay true. One such chuck is made by
Albrecht.
Get their keyless model. How fast do you run you little drills?
This
chuck will handle 50,000 RPM.
You will never drill a true hole with a twist drill anyway. They
are
incapable of doing it. They always walk sideways no mater how
care
you try to be.

so they are easy to chuck or put in a standard machine collet.
They
Small Parts bits did not have a standard shaft so your had to
chuck
up a .006" bit!

On my mill, I want to use a collet on something that small for
more
precision. Without an oversize shaft it was impossible.

Ned Carey

Larry is correct in his comments about small drills. You cannot
beat an Albrecht #15-JO precision chuck on a Cameron drill press for
small hole drilling. The 15-JO chuck will close down on a drill
from 0.001" to 1/16" maximum! Nice German engineering! The Cameron
drill press has bronze bushings - the best for eliminating any
spindle wobble. Ned - if you have a Sherline mill, an Albrecht
chuck would probably work very nice on it too.

Jobber length drills refer to the regular length drills you purchase
from, say, a hardware store. A #60 jobbers drill is 1-5/8" long
overall. Screw machine length drills refer to a shorter (and less
likely to "whip" during high speed drilling) length drill than the
corresponding sized jobber drill. A #60 screw machine drill is only
1-3/8" long overall.

HSS drills are made of "High Speed Steel" and should be sufficient
for most modeler's needs. Cobalt drills have a cobalt additive in
the steel which makes them considerably tougher - probably not
necessary in modeling unless you are drilling a lot of holes with
that drill, or drilling into harder materials. Cobalt drills are
more expensive. IMHO, carbide drills are probably inappropriate for
most modeling purposes. They are VERY tough, but also very brittle
and will easily shatter, particularly when breaking through a hole.
Their use requires a stable, higher speed machine - not hobby
friendly, but more production oriented. They are useful for
repetitive drilling of printed circuit boards (fiberglas is
abrasive) and are seen on Ebay frequently because of this.

If you buy quality drills made in the USA, you will find that, if
not abused, they will last longer than cheaper imported drills,
unless you get lucky. If your time has any value, you can probably
avoid a couple extra trips to the store for replacements with USA-
made drills. (I think the Vermont American brand drills sold at
some "big box" stores are imports now).

As for drill bits, they are generally available with a 118* point
and a 135* point. The 118* point is for drilling in general stuff
and brass. (The optimal point geometry for brass is supposed to be
90*). The 135* point is for drilling aluminum, and this drill
geometry tends to be less prone to wander in starting a hole
centered on a punch mark or intersecting lines. If you really need
accuracy, use a centering drill (90*) to start the hole, then drill
the rest of the hole with the drill. If you cannot find a centering
drill, a 60* countersink is the next best thing for starting holes,
although they are really for lathe work. As Larry says, a drill is
not the best way to locate holes accurately, but I say it is the
CHEAPEST!

Where do you find these drills? Not at Home Depot! Look in your
phone book and call a local machine shop - ask them where they get
their drills. The "big box" stores now carry cheap Chinese junk
drills for the most part.

Finally, a drill press is the most dangerous tool in the shop,
mainly because it does not look so threatening! People tend to get
more sloppy and careless when danger is not perceived when using a
machine. You should always clamp down the piece being drilled (what
modeler ever does that!) and wear safety glasses. A.T. Kott







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Re: Sherman Hill's Revenge

Dave Nelson <muskoka@...>
 

Mike Brock wrote:
Larry Jackman worked for UP <g>.



If memory serves, Larry Jackman worked for every outfit - rail or otherwise
-- in the U.S. He even got his own civil servant -- somebody assigned to
reconcile all the various employer submissions. Died of old age before she
got half way thru that pile of paper (there's a small monument to her on the
Capital mall).

Larry... you have a reputation! 8-)

Dave Nelson


Re: Replacement of National Type B trucks

leakinmywaders
 

Mark: I'm curious to see what comes up in response to this question.
But I can offer that the NP Ry had hundreds, possibly thousands of
boxcars and hoppers riding on National B-1 trucks right through the
1960s. Steel AAR-oid boxcars the NP rebuilt in the 1950s-1960s
retained (or possibly acquired) these trucks.
However, it appears cars running on National B-1s were not uprated
from 50 to 55 ton capacity the way many cars with ASF A-3 Ride Control
and certain other nominal 50-ton trucks were in the later 1960s (at
least on the NP).

Chris Frissell
Polson, MT

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Heiden" <mark_heiden@...> wrote:

Hello everyone,

I was looking at pictures of GTW and CB&Q boxcars that were delivered
with National Type B trucks. In these pictures, dated 1964, the Type
B trucks had been replaced with more conventional trucks. Was there a
flaw in the Type B trucks that caused them to be replaced? Would
these trucks still have been found under cars in the late 1950s?


Re: Dominion's Fowler patent box cars

Brad Bourbina <bbbourb@...>
 

Which ones, the Westerfield or the LL Canada?

Brad Bourbina

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of
A. Premo
Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2006 9:14 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Dominion's Fowler patent box cars


Yes,It was released in Canada as Life Like Canada.Questions have been
raised about this cars' accuracy.Having built several Westerfield kits of
this car I personally feel these cars better represent the prototype.Armand
Premo
----- Original Message -----
From: "Jared Harper" <harper-brown@juno.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2006 10:06 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Dominion's Fowler patent box cars


I've been reading with interest Ted's latest contribution to
his "Essential Freight Cars" series on Dominion's Fowler patent, single-
sheathed box cars. Do I remember correctly? Was there a plastic kit
for this car?

Jared Harper
Athens, GA






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Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.385 / Virus Database: 268.3.5/301 - Release Date: 4/4/2006




Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Dominion's Fowler patent box cars

armprem
 

Yes,It was released in Canada as Life Like Canada.Questions have been raised about this cars' accuracy.Having built several Westerfield kits of this car I personally feel these cars better represent the prototype.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jared Harper" <harper-brown@juno.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2006 10:06 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Dominion's Fowler patent box cars


I've been reading with interest Ted's latest contribution to
his "Essential Freight Cars" series on Dominion's Fowler patent, single-
sheathed box cars. Do I remember correctly? Was there a plastic kit
for this car?

Jared Harper
Athens, GA






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--
No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.385 / Virus Database: 268.3.5/301 - Release Date: 4/4/2006


Dominion's Fowler patent box cars

Jared Harper <harper-brown@...>
 

I've been reading with interest Ted's latest contribution to
his "Essential Freight Cars" series on Dominion's Fowler patent, single-
sheathed box cars. Do I remember correctly? Was there a plastic kit
for this car?

Jared Harper
Athens, GA


Replacement of National Type B trucks

Mark Heiden
 

Hello everyone,

I was looking at pictures of GTW and CB&Q boxcars that were delivered
with National Type B trucks. In these pictures, dated 1964, the Type
B trucks had been replaced with more conventional trucks. Was there a
flaw in the Type B trucks that caused them to be replaced? Would
these trucks still have been found under cars in the late 1950s?

Thanks,
Mark Heiden


Re: branded quality drill bits

proto48er
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, ljack70117@... wrote:

see below.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@...



On Apr 5, 2006, at 11:19 AM, Ned Carey wrote:

I'd add that Small Parts has HSS drills down to #97
I ordered a number of their small drill bits. I had to return
them.
Most small bits #80+ have a standard size shaft like .100"
Bits with the larger shanks are not standard. A shank on a
standard
drill bit is .001" smaller than the point dia. The drills you
are
talking are screw machine drill.
Why do you not buy a good drill chuck and protect it from side
pressure so it will stay true. One such chuck is made by
Albrecht.
Get their keyless model. How fast do you run you little drills?
This
chuck will handle 50,000 RPM.
You will never drill a true hole with a twist drill anyway. They
are
incapable of doing it. They always walk sideways no mater how
care
you try to be.

so they are easy to chuck or put in a standard machine collet.
They
Small Parts bits did not have a standard shaft so your had to
chuck
up a .006" bit!

On my mill, I want to use a collet on something that small for
more
precision. Without an oversize shaft it was impossible.

Ned Carey

Larry is correct in his comments about small drills. You cannot
beat an Albrecht #15-JO precision chuck on a Cameron drill press for
small hole drilling. The 15-JO chuck will close down on a drill
from 0.001" to 1/16" maximum! Nice German engineering! The Cameron
drill press has bronze bushings - the best for eliminating any
spindle wobble. Ned - if you have a Sherline mill, an Albrecht
chuck would probably work very nice on it too.

Jobber length drills refer to the regular length drills you purchase
from, say, a hardware store. A #60 jobbers drill is 1-5/8" long
overall. Screw machine length drills refer to a shorter (and less
likely to "whip" during high speed drilling) length drill than the
corresponding sized jobber drill. A #60 screw machine drill is only
1-3/8" long overall.

HSS drills are made of "High Speed Steel" and should be sufficient
for most modeler's needs. Cobalt drills have a cobalt additive in
the steel which makes them considerably tougher - probably not
necessary in modeling unless you are drilling a lot of holes with
that drill, or drilling into harder materials. Cobalt drills are
more expensive. IMHO, carbide drills are probably inappropriate for
most modeling purposes. They are VERY tough, but also very brittle
and will easily shatter, particularly when breaking through a hole.
Their use requires a stable, higher speed machine - not hobby
friendly, but more production oriented. They are useful for
repetitive drilling of printed circuit boards (fiberglas is
abrasive) and are seen on Ebay frequently because of this.

If you buy quality drills made in the USA, you will find that, if
not abused, they will last longer than cheaper imported drills,
unless you get lucky. If your time has any value, you can probably
avoid a couple extra trips to the store for replacements with USA-
made drills. (I think the Vermont American brand drills sold at
some "big box" stores are imports now).

As for drill bits, they are generally available with a 118* point
and a 135* point. The 118* point is for drilling in general stuff
and brass. (The optimal point geometry for brass is supposed to be
90*). The 135* point is for drilling aluminum, and this drill
geometry tends to be less prone to wander in starting a hole
centered on a punch mark or intersecting lines. If you really need
accuracy, use a centering drill (90*) to start the hole, then drill
the rest of the hole with the drill. If you cannot find a centering
drill, a 60* countersink is the next best thing for starting holes,
although they are really for lathe work. As Larry says, a drill is
not the best way to locate holes accurately, but I say it is the
CHEAPEST!

Where do you find these drills? Not at Home Depot! Look in your
phone book and call a local machine shop - ask them where they get
their drills. The "big box" stores now carry cheap Chinese junk
drills for the most part.

Finally, a drill press is the most dangerous tool in the shop,
mainly because it does not look so threatening! People tend to get
more sloppy and careless when danger is not perceived when using a
machine. You should always clamp down the piece being drilled (what
modeler ever does that!) and wear safety glasses. A.T. Kott


Re: Resin Casting Question

ljack70117@...
 

What do you consider a long pot life?
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@adelphia.net

On Apr 5, 2006, at 7:19 PM, Andy Carlson wrote:

Al's experience illustrates a difference in Production
work, and Hobby work. Techniques and processes differ
between the 2 methods used. I did not suffer those
problems which Al cites, because I coat the pattern
first with a thin "skin coat" of RTV before pouring in
the bulk amount. I do this because, unlike Al and the
other professionals, I do not use a vacuum de-airing
system. Us small time casters use methods which don't
lend themselves to production work. This explains why
some RTVs used in the industry are not the best RTVs
useful for our little operations. I hardly ever used
the commercial resins which were preferred by the
commercial casters because the demold time was far too
long. The resins used in vacuum assisted pouring have
to have a fairly long pot life to allow a family mold
to be filled, leveled, and placed in the Vacuum
chamber, and still be liquid to allow the bubble
removal. A home caster does not have a need to wait
that long.
-Andy Carlson

--- Westerfield <westerfield@charter.net> wrote:

I added ground-up pieces of old molds to new RTV for
awhile but gave it up because too many molds had
defects on the smooth surfaces of car sides - it
looked like teenage zits. - Al Westerfield
----- Original Message -----
From: Andy Carlson
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2006 11:30 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Resin Casting Question


One thing though, I did not have Charles' problems
in
stretching mold pouring supplies with additions of
previously cured RTV. My frequent results indicate
that same brand RTV chunks added to the uncured
RTV
seemed to have NO chemical deleterious effects.

[Non-text portions of this message have been
removed]




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Re: Photo of R-40-25 (was another PFE Reefer)

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Bruce Smith wrote:
"Oh, and notice how dirty that reefer is? PFE used to wash their
reefers on every trip, or nearly so. In the late 1950's the
president of the operation halted all washing and their cars started
looking a tad ratty!"

Tim Gilbert replied:
"You might want to duck for cover before Berkeley pounces. Your
favorite road was not noted for washing its equipment."

Neither was anyone else - remember, we're talking about washing
FREIGHT CARS, and PFE was unique in this aspect! As for Tony
jumping in, where do you think Bruce got this information? From p
159 of Thompson/Church/Jones' Pacific Fruit Express:

"In the post-war period, PFE continued to wash car exteriors,
averaging almost 11,000 cars per year during 1945-48. Labor costs
caused washing frequency to decrease sharply in 1949, and remained
at about 2000 cars annually until 1955. At that time, PFE requested
funds to construct a mechanical car washer, to replace the hand
labor used since World War I for this task. The request
unfortunately brought the car-washing practice to the attention of
Southern Pacific's blunt-spoken President, D.J. Russell, who not
only denied the request, but exclaimed, 'You're never going to wash
a goddamn freight car on my railroad.' Car washing declined
sharply, and soon thereafter was halted for good. The only cars
washed in later years were in the course of repairs or repainting."


Ben Hom


Re: Resin Casting Question

Andy Carlson
 

Al's experience illustrates a difference in Production
work, and Hobby work. Techniques and processes differ
between the 2 methods used. I did not suffer those
problems which Al cites, because I coat the pattern
first with a thin "skin coat" of RTV before pouring in
the bulk amount. I do this because, unlike Al and the
other professionals, I do not use a vacuum de-airing
system. Us small time casters use methods which don't
lend themselves to production work. This explains why
some RTVs used in the industry are not the best RTVs
useful for our little operations. I hardly ever used
the commercial resins which were preferred by the
commercial casters because the demold time was far too
long. The resins used in vacuum assisted pouring have
to have a fairly long pot life to allow a family mold
to be filled, leveled, and placed in the Vacuum
chamber, and still be liquid to allow the bubble
removal. A home caster does not have a need to wait
that long.
-Andy Carlson

--- Westerfield <westerfield@charter.net> wrote:

I added ground-up pieces of old molds to new RTV for
awhile but gave it up because too many molds had
defects on the smooth surfaces of car sides - it
looked like teenage zits. - Al Westerfield
----- Original Message -----
From: Andy Carlson
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2006 11:30 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Resin Casting Question


One thing though, I did not have Charles' problems
in
stretching mold pouring supplies with additions of
previously cured RTV. My frequent results indicate
that same brand RTV chunks added to the uncured
RTV
seemed to have NO chemical deleterious effects.

[Non-text portions of this message have been
removed]




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Re: Modeler's Guide to Steel Boxcars (or "Boxcars for Dummies")

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Hopefully, the Editors will be bombarded with favorable
responses which will show them and the marketing people that
there is interest in sophisticated topics, and where the
interest is, the money should flow.

Tim Gilbert
Won't work if we do it, though, since Andy S is monitoring the list and knows all our names . . .

SGL


Re: Photo of R-40-25 (was another PFE Reefer)

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Bruce Smith wrote:


On Apr 5, 2006, at 12:53 PM, David Smith wrote:

What is the significance of the white stencil on the left side, which
appears to say "PFE Heated (heater?) Storage"?
Oh, and notice how dirty that reefer is? PFE used to wash their reefers on every trip, or nearly so. In the late 1950's the president of the operation halted all washing and their cars started looking a tad ratty!
Bruce,

You might want to duck for cover before Berkeley pounces. Your favorite road was not noted for washing its equipment.

Tim Gilbert


Re: Resin Casting Question

Charles Morrill <badlands@...>
 

Hi Andy,
The problem I had with stretching the RTV volume with chunks of old RTV was exactly what you described --- trapped air and chunks floating above the pour-line. For my situation at the time, it caused more trouble and labor than the RTV it saved was worth. But, it is a good bit of info to remember where it will have some use.

Regarding platinum vs. tin based RTVs --- I can never keep which is which straight (not unusal problem for me according to my spouse). I think the platinum based is the harder usually white compound mixed 10 parts to 1 part catalyst by weight. The other softer and more fluid compound (the tin based?) is usually green/blue and mixed 1 part A to 1 part B by volume. Is that correct? Anyway, I have used both types and each has its advantages and problems. Lately, I've used the latter mostly because of ease of making small molds quickly, which don't need a long (several years, hundreds of castings) life.

That was a neat trick with the roof extension casting. I want to remember that one.
Charlie

----- Original Message -----
From: "Andy Carlson" <midcentury@sbcglobal.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2006 11:30 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Resin Casting Question


Boy, is Charles ever right about discovering new
tricks when working with molding and casting. Starting
with a basic primer for introduction, most STMFC
modelers will build up a huge bag of tricks,
especially if one is to experiment.

One thing though, I did not have Charles' problems in
stretching mold pouring supplies with additions of
previously cured RTV. My frequent results indicate
that same brand RTV chunks added to the uncured RTV
seemed to have NO chemical deleterious effects. You do
have to be careful about chunks erupting above the top
of the pour-line, but this can be controlled by using
smaller chunks. Also, take care about introducing
trapped air to the mold. I have even used 2nd
generation chunks with no-ill effects. My experience
has shown that this works with all of the Platinum
based RTVs I have used, this was untested on Tin based
RTVs, which I do not recommend at all for the hobbyist
mold maker in that molds made from them deteriorate
rapidly on the shelf.

I will further discourage using chunks of cured resin
in the casting process, for no other reason little
economy is offered as resin is pretty inexpensive. I
have experimented with making a 50' roof from a mold
for a 40' roof. I took a cured casting of a 40' roof,
cut it in half (randomly) and placed both pieces of
the 40' roof spaced with about a 10' gap back into to
mold where I had curled the ends of the mold down to
allow the roof pieces to remain straight. I poured
fresh resin into the the mold in the space between
roof sections, and allowed to cure. Resin bonds
extremely well to its cured self. I made a 3/3 IDE end
into a 4/4 IDE w/o any sanding or precision cutting. A
real cool use of Resin's properties!
-Andy Carlson

--- Charles Morrill <badlands@nts-online.net> wrote:

I found a similar result when I tried to
stretch the RTV volume by
adding old RTV chunks to the liquid.

I am still learning and discovering new tricks to
this casting model parts.
It is really worth while to add the process to your
model building tool kit.
Charlie






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Re: Resin Casting Question

Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

I added ground-up pieces of old molds to new RTV for awhile but gave it up because too many molds had defects on the smooth surfaces of car sides - it looked like teenage zits. - Al Westerfield

----- Original Message -----
From: Andy Carlson
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2006 11:30 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Resin Casting Question


One thing though, I did not have Charles' problems in
stretching mold pouring supplies with additions of
previously cured RTV. My frequent results indicate
that same brand RTV chunks added to the uncured RTV
seemed to have NO chemical deleterious effects.


Re: Kadee's new offset twin hopper

Ed Hawkins
 

On Wednesday, April 5, 2006, at 12:26 PM, jim_mischke wrote:

Thank you, Ed.

Are the new Kadee offest side twin hopper cars good for Reading
classes HTa, HTb, or HTc?  All three?

Reason I ask is that these Reading cars were very common on the B&O
in the 1950's, B&O even picked up over 2000 of them during 1964-
1966, including road numbers B&O 234000-235999.
Jim,
The model's "good" for all of Reading's AAR 50-ton hoppers as long as
you don't mind having some of the side stake angles oriented in a
different direction. However, the classes on the photos of the cars I
have are HTT, HTU, and HTV (series 81000-87999, not inclusive) built by
Bethlehem Steel Co. from 1948 to 1957.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: branded quality drill bits

eabracher@...
 

In a message dated 4/5/06 6:21:40 PM, atkott@swbell.net writes:



Larry is correct in his comments about small drills.  You cannot
beat an Albrecht #15-JO precision chuck on a Cameron drill press for
small hole drilling.  The 15-JO chuck will close down on a drill
from 0.001" to 1/16" maximum!  Nice German engineering!  The Cameron
drill press has bronze bushings - the best for eliminating any
spindle wobble. 
I have one of these that I have used for over 30 years and it is still going
strong. Highly recomend it even at the cost.

eric


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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