Date   

Re: Underframes 101

Jack Mullen
 

No, the 1-3/8" dimension is the nominal ID, not OD. (Same story as
pipe sizes.) I'll check the OD and post later today.

Jack Mullen

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas M. Olsen" <tmolsen@...> wrote:

Art,
The outside diameter of the air hose is 1 3/8" as described on
page 4 of
the file.

Tom Olsen
7 boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@...

Arthur Haberlin wrote:

Firstly thank you for all who found and then re-published this
paper, I have
downloaded from the STMFC files since I am currently on a slow
dial-up
connection.

I just have one question please.

Can anyone tell me what the actual outside diameter of the air
hose (the
flexible pipe itself) is?

There is an illustration with an annotation but the scan just
can't be read
by these old eyes!

Thank you in advance
Arthur Haberlin




I just made 47 downloads

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote: Douglas Harding
wrote:


The Freight Car Underbody Details handout by Gene Green, the pdf
version has been posted at:
http://rapidshare.de/files/16945521/Freight_car_Underbody.pdf.html

Thanks to Doug for preparing this scan, and of course Gene
Green's work in compiling it in the first place. It will be
interesting
to monitor the number of times it's downloaded. I noted when
doing so
that there had been 22 previous downloads. Maybe in a few days
Doug or
someone could update us on this number, which may have some
correlation
with the number of "serious" (or deranged) members of this list.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Yahoo! Groups Links












ADMIN: Brass Bealer's Business Practices = Not

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Man...you guys are working me these days. Three Admin messages in two days.

I guess some members either have poor memories, don't bother with the rules or...

Anyhow, as I have noted many more times than I can remember, the STMFC does NOT involve itself with the business practices of companies conducting businesses associated with the hobby. If you have a complaint...or knowledge [ real knowledge, not just hearsay ]...of a problem the group should know about, send it to me and I'll send it to the group if needed.

Note that I commented about the large collection at the 1977 National. I knew full well that there was some judicial issue with the owner but I do not know the facts. Misrepresenting them did not seem proper. Since then, there have been several messages about the guy...all incorrect. The guy was definitely not John Winston [ Balls of Brass ]...whom I know. Winston IS in Montana, still has an active website and, I assume, is active in his business. Considering that he conducts it mail order, he is very vulnerable to federal oversight and, if you have a complaint...there's where to go....not the STMFC.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: Underframes 101

Thomas M. Olsen <tmolsen@...>
 

Art,
The outside diameter of the air hose is 1 3/8" as described on page 4 of
the file.

Tom Olsen
7 boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@udel.edu

Arthur Haberlin wrote:

Firstly thank you for all who found and then re-published this paper, I have
downloaded from the STMFC files since I am currently on a slow dial-up
connection.

I just have one question please.

Can anyone tell me what the actual outside diameter of the air hose (the
flexible pipe itself) is?

There is an illustration with an annotation but the scan just can't be read
by these old eyes!

Thank you in advance
Arthur Haberlin




I just made 47 downloads

Anthony Thompson <thompson@signaturepress.com> wrote: Douglas Harding
wrote:


The Freight Car Underbody Details handout by Gene Green, the pdf
version has been posted at:

http://rapidshare.de/files/16945521/Freight_car_Underbody.pdf.html

Thanks to Doug for preparing this scan, and of course Gene
Green's work in compiling it in the first place. It will be interesting
to monitor the number of times it's downloaded. I noted when doing so
that there had been 22 previous downloads. Maybe in a few days Doug or
someone could update us on this number, which may have some correlation
with the number of "serious" (or deranged) members of this list.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history






Yahoo! Groups Links









Re: Underframes 101

Thomas M. Olsen <tmolsen@...>
 

Tony and List,

This PDF of Gene's Freight Car Underbody Details has been downloaded 91 times with myself as the 91st to do so. Ironically, while waiting for the file to download, I was pawing through a pile of documents that I am presently putting into Avery reference protectors and binders and came across an envelope that was unmarked. On opening same, I found an original copy of the very file that I was downloading off the web. Gene had offered copies of his original treatise on underbody and brake detail to whoever asked for a copy and the file that I found was the copy that Gene sent to me over a year ago.

To Gene: many thanks for a superb effort in compiling this information and making it available to those who asked for it.


Re: Seeking excerpts from obscure equipment diagram books - Oops

Brian Botton <bbotton@...>
 

On Fri, 2006-03-31 at 21:01 -0700, Brian Botton wrote:
I don't mind sharing what I have. But what I have isn't on your
list. What I do have:

Several hundred pictures that I took of old NKP, D&RGW, and
Monon AAR 50-ton flat cars (still in existence). On CD and
ready to make copies.

Pictures of the Alcoa experimental aluminum hopper that's
on display just North of Monon, IN.

CB&QRR truck diagrams book from their mechanical department.
Scanned and read to make CDs.
Oops, my bad. I still need to scan the CB&QRR truck diagrams in.
They'll be next.

What is scanned in are D&H air brake diagrams, ready to placed on
a CD.

Van Dorn Couplers catalog. Need to scan. This really predates
our era. Late 1800s is more appropriate.

The M.C.B Coupler, by Edwin C. Washburn, 1944. Need to scan
in. This is a pretty cool booklet.

I probably have other stuff too, but can't think of it now. I'm more
than willing to make copies for people.
Brian Botton
Colorado Springs, CO


Re: Underframes 101

Arthur Haberlin
 

Firstly thank you for all who found and then re-published this paper, I have
downloaded from the STMFC files since I am currently on a slow dial-up
connection.

I just have one question please.

Can anyone tell me what the actual outside diameter of the air hose (the
flexible pipe itself) is?

There is an illustration with an annotation but the scan just can't be read
by these old eyes!

Thank you in advance
Arthur Haberlin

I just made 47 downloads

Anthony Thompson <thompson@signaturepress.com> wrote: Douglas Harding
wrote:
The Freight Car Underbody Details handout by Gene Green, the pdf
version has been posted at:

http://rapidshare.de/files/16945521/Freight_car_Underbody.pdf.html
Thanks to Doug for preparing this scan, and of course Gene
Green's work in compiling it in the first place. It will be interesting
to monitor the number of times it's downloaded. I noted when doing so
that there had been 22 previous downloads. Maybe in a few days Doug or
someone could update us on this number, which may have some correlation
with the number of "serious" (or deranged) members of this list.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Ancient Denver NMRA Convention

Thomas M. Olsen <tmolsen@...>
 

Andy,
He is still selling brass. He left Maryland after retiring from Social
Security on the Beltway and moved to Stevensville Montana. He still
owes people here for deposits on brass freight cars and locomotives that
had not been released when he disappeared from the Baltimore area. His
real name is John Winston, but always ignored anyone calling him by his
name at train shows. He was "Bob Brass" to everyone and his wife was
known as "Mrs. Bob Brass."

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@udel.edu

Andy Carlson wrote:

I had a similar experience with the crook dba "B***s
of Brass".
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

--- Denny Anspach <danspach@macnexus.org> wrote:

I never received the


model, nor received
my money back. He still owes me.

Collector, or mere thief? >:-o

Denny




Yahoo! Groups Links








Re: Underframes please upload to wuarchive

Brian Botton <bbotton@...>
 

On Sun, 2006-04-02 at 00:35 -0600, Allen Rueter wrote:
If someone can shoot me a copy of the underframes,
(please ftp upload to wuarchive.wustl.edu:/pub/incoming )
this is a write only place, i can then move it to a public place.

Thanks
Done.

Allen - please see my offline e-mail to you.

Brian Botton
Colorado Springs, CO


Re: Underframes please upload to wuarchive

Allen Rueter <allen@...>
 

If someone can shoot me a copy of the underframes,
(please ftp upload to wuarchive.wustl.edu:/pub/incoming )
this is a write only place, i can then move it to a public place.

Thanks

--
------
Allen P Rueter o0000o Phone: 314/935-6429 email allen :) artsci.wustl.edu
.oO* there are at least three sides to every issue.


Re: Underframes 101- Thanks

pgrace
 

Hear hear!

Patrick Grace UK

----- Original Message -----
From: "Roger Parry" <uncleroger@worldnet.att.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, April 02, 2006 1:26 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Underframes 101- Thanks


Let me add my thanks, what a valuable resource of info! Thank you so much for sharing!
On Apr 1, 2006, at 12:14 PM, Bill Kelly wrote:

Doug, thank you very much for the time and effort, I appreciate it.
Thank you Gene for making this information available in the first place.

Later,
Bill Kelly


you wrote:
The Freight Car Underbody Details handout by Gene Green, the lamb
pdf version has been posted at:

http://rapidshare.de/files/16945521/Freight_car_Underbody.pdf.html

This is the actual document, not the OCR scan found in the group
files. You will see the pages as Gene actually prepared them.

Thanks to Jerry Glow for the suggestion to use this site, which
permits sharing of large files.

Doug Harding
Iowa Central Railroad
http://d.harding.home.mchsi.com


Yahoo! Groups Links





Yahoo! Groups Links
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Re: Code 88 wheels?

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Dennis Storzek writes that I said:

Why that is true is partly due
to the fact that the wheels are often not in their worst case scenario and,
in fact, probably never are when traveling the diverging track....
And responds with:

It's only the LEADING wheelsets that are
crowding the outside rail of the curve. The trailing wheelset tends to
crowd the inner rail.
True enough. Oddly, I notice variable tendencies on long wheel base steam locos....although the leading wheel always finds itself on the outside rail. The rearmost wheel on a 2-10-2 seems to wander on different tests. Perhaps this is due to other factors...such as resistance to lateral movement by different drivers. At any rate, the real danger seems to be with the leading wheel...which solves itself by riding as close as possible to the frog rail. However, the issue seems a non event. What I term a Code 88T wheel in the trucks we use will perform OK on track built to S 3.2 and turnouts built to RP 12.3. The pilot truck wheel, BTW, tracks the outside rail in a curve also.

Incidentally, you might find it interesting that I built a crossing in which a 48" radius curve crossed one of about 150" radius. A thing of beauty it was...I like trackwork...but my 4-12-2's would not negotiate the thing on the 48" side. And, they have no problem with 48" radius curves. I cannot say what the problem was...everyone else was happy and it checked out OK. Solution? Convert the two "middle" frogs to moving points. Now the 4-12-2's are happy, the frt cars are very happy, and it was of necessity.

Mike Brock


Re: Seeking excerpts from obscure equipment diagram books

Rob Adams
 

Craig and others;

The written word is a wonderful thing, except when we don't use it carefully enough. I apologize for my inadequacies in that realm the first time around. Some of my comments have obviously been misinterpreted, so I'll attempt to clarify my original post.

I'll start off by stating that I understood Jim Mischke's inquiry to have been about "equipment diagrams" or "line drawings" from the RR's Mechanical Departments, rather than "lettering" or "stenciling" drawings/diagrams. That is the context in which any of my comments about diagrams was set. By no means did I intend to imply that Craig's book lacks "lettering" drawings, nor that most of his book deals with the AA's ex-DT&I cars. I regret if my lack of clarity caused my comments to be taken in that way. I think it is safe to say that the majority of the "equipment" diagrams in Craig's book are for AA equipment that is outside the focus of this group.

For the record, Craig's book has a multitude of excellent "lettering" drawings, which he painstakingly created by studying the available photographic record. He clearly made every effort to detail all of the cars which were constructed or added to the roster from 1947-on, and his documentation of the many lettering variants, especially those of the 1960's and later is a thing to behold. Those drawings and accompanying text are precisely why I still believe his book was ahead of its time. How many other road's freight car fleets have a book like that today, let alone in 1989 when it was published?

Unfortunately, the photographic record for the pre-1960 era Ann Arbor cars has always been an elusive mistress, and in some of Craig's material that covers cars prior to 1960, his conclusions about lettering turned out to be inaccurate to at least some degree. This should NOT be interpeted as criticism, for it is not meant to be. I have no doubt that Craig would have come to different conclusions if he'd had more material at his disposal. I must also emphasize that the inaccuracies are certainly in the minority, but I suspect all would agree that we need to know that they exist. In this particular case, most all that I'm aware of apply to our official "Steam-era" period of interest (pre-1960).

I would consider the following to be noteworthy "Steam-era" variances from material in Craig's book (I'm sure Craig is probably aware of some if not most of these). They form the basis for my original comment that the steam-era modeler may not find his book to be as useful as would the diesel-era modeler (assuming accuracy of resultant modeling as the primary criterion):

*** The May 1947 Wabash-built 68000-680049 series 40-foot box cars definitely wore more than one scheme, and were delivered with 14 inch road name lettering and no pennant herald. Further, 14 inch lettering stencils with the a different style of "R" was used on at least some cars as documented in the early 1950's. Examples of both solid and outline Pennant heralds exist, with an Outline pennant herald documented on at least one car with 14 inch lettering and a modified "R".

*** The 1951 AC&F built 1000-1099 series 40-foot box cars were also delivered with 14- inch lettering and no pennant herald and may have had other lettering variants as with the 68000-series cars.

*** The AA 1100-1149 series box cars which came second hand from the Wabash in 1954 are not covered. Granted, photographs of these in revenue service with AA lettering are very rare, but many of them ended up in MOW service and several existed well into the 1990's. The cars are well-documented in that respect, and the original revenue service paint schemes were visible behind the failing MOW paint jobs.

*** The AA lettering standard for box cars apparently changed to 18-inch tall road name stencil in 1954 or 55. This information came to light after the book was published.

*** Many Ann Arbor freight cars from the steam era wore a 14-inch lettering variant with a modified "R". Was this a function of the road's lettering specs for the car series, or where/when they were painted (Wabash Decatur shops vs. AA Owosso shop???) or even who painted them? We'll probably never know, but the variants are apparent.

*** In the case of the 1929-built 30500-30599 series USRA-style open hoppers though, every photograph I've seen of them shows the modified "R", but Craig's drawing shows a different style "R" instead, essentially like that used on the photographed composite hoppers and covered hoppers. Were there USRA type hoppers painted with that style of R? Perhaps, but it doesn't appear to have been standard, and CDS dry transfer set developed for the models uses the R from the drawing. Big deal??? Is this picking nits??? Geez, it's just an R after all. I mention this not as a judge, but as a factual observation. It is up to each of us to determine for his/her own uses whether that is a concern.

*** There is no coverage of several steam-era AA cars that were still on the roster in 1947. Prominent examples are the four series of AA's single-sheathed box cars which formed the backbone of the AA box car fleet until wholesale retirements in 1956-59 when the AA PS-1 box cars arrived. There are other examples of missing cars that were still relevant to a WWII-era modeler (obviously prior to 1947). e.g. the 36 and 40-foot AA double sheathed box cars and 40-ft steel gondolas.

***Just an objective observation, and not intended as critical - the type of power brake gear, running boards, trucks, etc. used on the equipment is not explicitly discussed for most equipment. Obviously, an educated reader may be able to determine that on his own from the photos if they are included, but often the book photos do not answer the questions. (We ask a lot more of these questions today than in 1989!)

To wrap this up, I'd like to emphasize that my original comments about Craig's book were indeed intended as compliments. I've always considered it an an exemplary work and an excellent resource. I'll also re-emphasize my statement that the book is a must-have for any diesel-era modeler with an interest in the AA freight car fleet. The book does however, have significant voids for a modeler interested in the AA's freight car fleet prior to 1960, and especially prior to 1955. This is not a criticism of Craig's effort and attention to detail, but merely a statement of reality. Craig got it done with as much perfection as was possible in 1989. Today, the awareness of material is greater, our community of prototype modelers is much larger, and as a result there are now answers available that weren't then. The same holds true for some of the material I authored in the early and mid-1990's about the AA's steam-era box cars and other topics. Craig's observation "that the most certain way to get people to share information is to put what I know out there and let them chime in to correct any mistakes." is right on the mark. Publish and they will come...the corrections, that is.

Best regards, Rob Adams



craig wilson wrote:

Subject: Re: Re: Seeking excerpts from obscure equipment diagram books

jim_mischke wrote:

Are there no source material freight car diagrams for Ann Arbor, Lake
Terminal, Maine Central, Lehigh and New England, Lehigh Valley, CNJ,
Rock Island, B&M, B&LE, P&LE, PRR X-43 boxcars, Reading or
Virginian??
rob adams wrote:

Now back to the AA... There are apparently some later AA diagrams
around from the period of DT&I control (post-1963), and a few appeared
in Craig Wilson's book about Ann Arbor freight cars. However a good
number of those are from reassigned ex-DT&I cars that are not relevant
to the period of this group (At least from an AA focus).
Gee Rob, thanks for the compliments...I think. Other than one chapter on
DT&I-cars given AA reporting marks and another on leased cars, the book
addresses freight cars built for the AA starting in 1947 (with the first
all-steel boxcars). I'm certain that Rob intended to indicate that some the
cars built/repainted later (and certainly the ex-DT&I cars) are outside the
scope of this list but I'm afraid his comment might give the impression that
a lot of the book is about those ex-DT&I cars.

All of the paint diagrams were drawn from photographs of specific cars so
they should be accurate for at least that car. A lot of hand-drawing was
necessary at the time since I didn't have today's computer-graphics
technology available to me (or the skills to use it).

To say that some of the cars were obscure is a monumental understatement.
Speculation about a few details was a last resort. Eventually it comes down
to "get it perfect vs. get it done." Besides, I had learned that the most
certain way to get people to share information is to put what I know out
there and let them chime in to correct any mistakes.

There are many copies of the DT&I/Ann Arbor equipment diagram books out
there. Many are photocopies of photocopies of...ad infinitum, but they
provide valuable information. I agree with Rob that any copies of diagrams
for the pre-1947 AA cars seem to be lost to history. There are stories from
when the DT&I took over the AA, of workers hauling out large piles of
paperwork, digging a pit, and burning all of it. If true, I suspect that
these older diagram books may have been part of that purge.

Craig Wilson

--
Rob Adams
Wellman, IA
steamera@netins.net
Modeling CB&Q, CRI&P and Wabash operations in Keokuk, IA,
the Wabash Bluffs, IL to Keokuk branch, and the CB&Q's Keokuk & Western branch, circa 1938
<http://www.KeokukandWesternRR.com>


Re: Predecessors to Car Builders Cyclopedias ?

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

DR Stinson wrote:
I've noticed three different volumes of the "Proceedings of the ... Annual
Convention of the International Railroad Master Blacksmiths Association"
show up on eBay. The dates are 1913, 1914 and 1916. I have some of the
Simmons-Boardman Car Builders Cyclopedias and was wondering if these
Blacksmith Convention Proceedings were the forerunners of the Car Builders
Cyclopedias?
Not at all. The MCB was founded decades earlier and was an important force in the first Car Builders Dictionaries (as they originally were), again years before the dates you list.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Underframes 101

David Smith <dsmith@...>
 

Now this is what makes this list great - some initial research revealed
a gap in the readily available information and multiple people stepped
in to fill the gap, and then some. Thank you all, but especially Doug
and Jerry!

Dave Smith


Re: Underframes 101

Max Robin
 

Tony:

Thanks for reminding the readers of the group about Doug's post of Gene
Green's Freight Car Underframe presentation. As one who downloaded the 19+
MB file, I can testify to its worth and accuracy!

Max
(ex NYC/PC Mechanical Department)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------
email: m_robin@cheatriver.com

smail: Max S. Robin, P.E.
Cheat River Engineering Inc.
23 Richwood Place / P. O. Box 289
Denville, NJ 07834 - 0289

Voice: 973-627-5895 (Home : 7:30AM - 10:30PM EST)
973-627-5460 (Business: 8:00AM - 10:30PM EST)
973-945-5007 (Cellular : 7:00AM - MidNight EST)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Anthony Thompson
Sent: Saturday, April 01, 2006 12:37 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] RE: Underframes 101

Douglas Harding wrote:
The Freight Car Underbody Details handout by Gene Green, the pdf
version has been posted at:

http://rapidshare.de/files/16945521/Freight_car_Underbody.pdf.html
Thanks to Doug for preparing this scan, and of course Gene
Green's work in compiling it in the first place. It will be interesting
to monitor the number of times it's downloaded. I noted when doing so
that there had been 22 previous downloads. Maybe in a few days Doug or
someone could update us on this number, which may have some correlation
with the number of "serious" (or deranged) members of this list.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history




Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Predecessors to Car Builders Cyclopedias ?

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

DR Stinson wrote:

I've noticed three different volumes of the "Proceedings of the ... Annual
Convention of the International Railroad Master Blacksmiths Association"
show up on eBay. The dates are 1913, 1914 and 1916. I have some of the
Simmons-Boardman Car Builders Cyclopedias and was wondering if these
Blacksmith Convention Proceedings were the forerunners of the Car Builders
Cyclopedias? The images suggest there's a lot of information in them.

If you want to see what I'm referring to, the item numbers are 6616405435,
6616430889 and 6616451104, all for sale by "hutch-hotline". I have no
financial interest in these, but wonder if they would be a valuable
reference for early equipment.
Dan,

No - these Proceedings were the transcript of the issues and debates of the participants of the Annual Convention of the International Railroad Masters Blacksmith's Association. The Master Car Builders (later District V of the ARA) also had their own convention where the debates over carbuilding, loading rules, etc. were included in their "Proceedings." Another RR organization was the RR Superintendents which also published their proceedings from their annual conventions - I have copies of the Proceedings for various years of the latter two organizations - I have no idea of what precisely the Blacksmiths were debating.

Cyclopedias published by Simmons Boardman were basically a catalogue of railroad industry products with some specifications and regulations like stenciling rules thrown in.

Tim Gilbert


Predecessors to Car Builders Cyclopedias ?

 

I've noticed three different volumes of the "Proceedings of the ... Annual
Convention of the International Railroad Master Blacksmiths Association"
show up on eBay. The dates are 1913, 1914 and 1916. I have some of the
Simmons-Boardman Car Builders Cyclopedias and was wondering if these
Blacksmith Convention Proceedings were the forerunners of the Car Builders
Cyclopedias? The images suggest there's a lot of information in them.

If you want to see what I'm referring to, the item numbers are 6616405435,
6616430889 and 6616451104, all for sale by "hutch-hotline". I have no
financial interest in these, but wonder if they would be a valuable
reference for early equipment.

Dan Stinson
Helena, Montana


Re: Underframes 101

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Anthony Thompson
I noted . . . that there had been 22
previous downloads.
I was No. 36.

SGL


Re: Underframes 101

Charlie Vlk
 

If you get an error message and your computer refuses to download this file.....you'll have to go to the Adobe website and get the free download for the latest version of Acrobat Reader.
Thanks to Gene and Doug for providing this valuable resource in this medium...
Charlie Vlk


Re: Underframes 101

jerryglow2
 

As they say about voting: do it early and do it often <g> As a free
resourse, the file only stays available for 30 days after the 1st
download so the clock is ticking...

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Thanks to Doug for preparing this scan, and of course Gene
Green's work in compiling it in the first place. It will be
interesting
to monitor the number of times it's downloaded. I noted when doing
so
that there had been 22 previous downloads. Maybe in a few days
Doug or
someone could update us on this number, which may have some
correlation
with the number of "serious" (or deranged) members of this list.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

133081 - 133100 of 186254