Date   

Re: Model Railroad 10 Year Archive 201-2019

Nelson Moyer
 

The DVD files open in Adobe Reader. That’s not the problem. There is no link between issues for global search, and there is no cumulative index for manual search. In fact, there is no search engine except the Adobe Reader search engine for searches within the open file, i.e. one issue at a time.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of schmuck804_99 via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, May 06, 2020 10:34 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Model Railroad 10 Year Archive 201-2019

 

You need to strip the Digital Rights Management (DRM)
https://www.howtogeek.com/162994/how-to-strip-the-drm-from-your-kindle-ebooks-for-cross-device-enjoyment-and-archiving/

The first digital book I bought from Morning Sun would only open with a specific reader. I stripped the DRM and it opened right up.
Chris


Re: Accurate measured cutting of styrene sheets

Tim O'Connor
 

3M Magic Tape spanning both sides of the cut.

=======================

Hi Andy,
I have used a paper cutter in the past myself. One thing I found is that when cutting long narrow strips, there is a tendency for the styrene to develop a bit of a curl, and then it is difficult to use the strip as a long straight piece because the curl makes it want to lift up and/or not lay straight when used. Have you also had this experience? If so, how do you handle this?
Claus Schlund


--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: Model Railroad 10 Year Archive 201-2019

schmuck804_99@...
 

You need to strip the Digital Rights Management (DRM)
https://www.howtogeek.com/162994/how-to-strip-the-drm-from-your-kindle-ebooks-for-cross-device-enjoyment-and-archiving/

The first digital book I bought from Morning Sun would only open with a specific reader. I stripped the DRM and it opened right up.
Chris


Re: Model Railroad 10 Year Archive 201-2019

Nelson Moyer
 

As I said, the discs are copy protected. You cannot copy them to any memory device.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of G.J. Irwin
Sent: Wednesday, May 06, 2020 8:49 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Model Railroad 10 Year Archive 201-2019

 

I don't know if this will work with the 2010-2019 archive, however I installed the 1934-1999 archive from the four (!) DVDs onto a USB 64MB "stick."  I then access the entire archive from there.  It is possible to install multiple times, as I have discovered when the first 64GB "stick" quit on me.  (They are not as stable as advertised.) 

I went with that solution so that I could carry the stick with me to bring on trips, for downtime.

As noted previously by myself and others, the resolution of these digitized issues is not all that great.  I wonder if there has been any improvement with the 2010-2019 version.

Cheers,
George Irwin


Locomotive sounds = off topic

Aley, Jeff A
 

Hi Folks,

 

               While some locomotives did haul Steam-Era Freight Cars, this is not a list dedicated to them.  This list is about Steam-Era Freight Cars.

 

               So if you have additional comments or ideas about the sound an electric locomotive makes, please send them OFF LIST to the person who asked the question.

 

Thanks,

 

-Jeff Aley

Deputy Moderator, RealSTMFC

 

 


Re: Accurate measured cutting of styrene sheets

Fred Swanson
 

I have onr of those old green ones. the blade on the table can be turned to use the back side. The one on the guillotine can be flipped. Snug the screws and check for squareness tap it until it is and tighten.
Fred Swanson


Re: Accurate measured cutting of styrene sheets

Schuyler Larrabee
 

“dropping down with less angle to the cut”

 

I think that’s key . . .

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Andy Carlson
Sent: Wednesday, May 06, 2020 8:55 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Accurate measured cutting of styrene sheets

 

I have found that dropping the blade handle super fast helps in getting less curl. Makes me fill like I am reinacting the French Revolution. I also place the cuts furthest out to where the blade is dropping down with less angle to the cut.

 

I will try an experiment where I am cutting a long, slim piece.

-Andy Carlson

Ojai CA

 

On Wednesday, May 6, 2020, 4:35:29 PM PDT, Claus Schlund \(HGM\) <claus@...> wrote:

 

 

Hi Andy,

 

I have used a paper cutter in the past myself. One thing I found is that when cutting long narrow strips, there is a tendency for the styrene to develop a bit of a curl, and then it is difficult to use the strip as a long straight piece because the curl makes it want to lift up and/or not lay straight when used. Have you also had this experience? If so, how do you handle this?

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

From: Andy Carlson

Sent: Wednesday, May 06, 2020 5:38 PM

To: STMFC

Subject: [RealSTMFC] Accurate measured cutting of styrene sheets

 

I have acquired three paper cutters over the last 5 years. One was a little used large model with a cast steel slicer and a hard wood deck.

 

I have found myself using the cutter more and more for making styrene pieces. My go-to method in the past was to use a dedicated dial caliper with one of the jaw points sharpened. I could scribe a full length line by dragging the non-sharpened jaw along the styrene edge, with the other jaw leaving a nice line. Place an exacto knife point into the scribe, and place the metal straight edge up to the knife blade and an accurate cut was assured. I did have to make a cheat compensation from the measured to exact differences, which in my case 0.003".

 

Now I simply use the depth pointer on the dial caliper to extend the caliper from the cutting edge of the paper cutter and slide the styrene sheet to the blocking point of the depth gauge. Aligning the styrene to the square lines on the base platform keeps the squareness assured. The beauty of this is the measurements are exact!

 

Another beauty of this paper cutter is the nice, straight edges without any left behind relic items which need follow up attention. The accuracy I achieve is down to 0.001". I have cut up to 0.040" though I am concerned that perhaps thicker styrene may hasten the dulling of the steel blade.

 

I needed to make a scale 1/2 inch by 2 inch door track protector, which was 5 foot long, on a wooden box car. I needed to make 4 or more attempts to get the perfect cut, but I was super pleased with the results. With this small of a cut, I simply eyeballed the sizes and kept trying to get to where I was satisfied. For this door track piece, I sliced an Avery peel and stick address label. When finished with the slicing, I peeled off the backing and the tiny track strip went down with good adhesion. I am super pleased with the scale size and strength.

 

I am 68 years old and I am still learning and trying new ideas!

 

-Andy Carlson

Ojai CA


Re: My superglue spouts stick to the caps

G.J. Irwin
 

Most Dollar Tree outlets (somehow still considered "essential" here in Western New York) sell four small tubes for -- yes, a dollar.  I consider them to be "single use" containers.  Use caution with these as frequently the entire contents comes out with one small squeeze. 

Harbor Freight has three slightly larger tubes for that same dollar.

George Irwin


Re: Accurate measured cutting of styrene sheets

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Thanks Andy for the helpful reply on this!
 
Claus Schlund
 

From: Andy Carlson
Sent: Wednesday, May 06, 2020 8:54 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Accurate measured cutting of styrene sheets
 
I have found that dropping the blade handle super fast helps in getting less curl. Makes me fill like I am reinacting the French Revolution. I also place the cuts furthest out to where the blade is dropping down with less angle to the cut.
 
I will try an experiment where I am cutting a long, slim piece.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA
 
On Wednesday, May 6, 2020, 4:35:29 PM PDT, Claus Schlund \(HGM\) <claus@...> wrote:
 
 
Hi Andy,
 
I have used a paper cutter in the past myself. One thing I found is that when cutting long narrow strips, there is a tendency for the styrene to develop a bit of a curl, and then it is difficult to use the strip as a long straight piece because the curl makes it want to lift up and/or not lay straight when used. Have you also had this experience? If so, how do you handle this?
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
From: Andy Carlson
Sent: Wednesday, May 06, 2020 5:38 PM
To: STMFC
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Accurate measured cutting of styrene sheets
 
I have acquired three paper cutters over the last 5 years. One was a little used large model with a cast steel slicer and a hard wood deck.
 
I have found myself using the cutter more and more for making styrene pieces. My go-to method in the past was to use a dedicated dial caliper with one of the jaw points sharpened. I could scribe a full length line by dragging the non-sharpened jaw along the styrene edge, with the other jaw leaving a nice line. Place an exacto knife point into the scribe, and place the metal straight edge up to the knife blade and an accurate cut was assured. I did have to make a cheat compensation from the measured to exact differences, which in my case 0.003".
 
Now I simply use the depth pointer on the dial caliper to extend the caliper from the cutting edge of the paper cutter and slide the styrene sheet to the blocking point of the depth gauge. Aligning the styrene to the square lines on the base platform keeps the squareness assured. The beauty of this is the measurements are exact!
 
Another beauty of this paper cutter is the nice, straight edges without any left behind relic items which need follow up attention. The accuracy I achieve is down to 0.001". I have cut up to 0.040" though I am concerned that perhaps thicker styrene may hasten the dulling of the steel blade.
 
I needed to make a scale 1/2 inch by 2 inch door track protector, which was 5 foot long, on a wooden box car. I needed to make 4 or more attempts to get the perfect cut, but I was super pleased with the results. With this small of a cut, I simply eyeballed the sizes and kept trying to get to where I was satisfied. For this door track piece, I sliced an Avery peel and stick address label. When finished with the slicing, I peeled off the backing and the tiny track strip went down with good adhesion. I am super pleased with the scale size and strength.
 
I am 68 years old and I am still learning and trying new ideas!
 
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Model Railroad 10 Year Archive 201-2019

G.J. Irwin
 

I don't know if this will work with the 2010-2019 archive, however I installed the 1934-1999 archive from the four (!) DVDs onto a USB 64MB "stick."  I then access the entire archive from there.  It is possible to install multiple times, as I have discovered when the first 64GB "stick" quit on me.  (They are not as stable as advertised.) 

I went with that solution so that I could carry the stick with me to bring on trips, for downtime.

As noted previously by myself and others, the resolution of these digitized issues is not all that great.  I wonder if there has been any improvement with the 2010-2019 version.

Cheers,
George Irwin


Re: Tsunami sound for GN Y-1 (PRR FF2)

Dave Parker
 

Freight car content?
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Tsunami sound for GN Y-1 (PRR FF2)

erieblt2
 

The New Haven EP-5’s were nick-named ‘Jets’ from the howl of the cooling blowers. I heard them. They were loud, and not a pleasant sound for the layout(in my opinion). I agree that a European Electric would be interesting and a good starting point. Good luck. Bill S.


On May 6, 2020, at 2:19 PM, Ray Hutchison <rayhutchison2@...> wrote:

I have several Great Northern Y-1s (that later became the FF2s) and would like to add DCC and sound.  I have not been able to locate sound files for the engine and am wondering if anyone could point me to where they can be found?  

One suggestion from another list was to look for sound files for European heavy electrics because they might be the same, but I don't want to do that (except as last resort).  

Would the GG1 sound files be t all close to the FF2?

Thank you for any leads and suggestions!

Ray Hutchison
Green Bay WI


Re: Tsunami sound for GN Y-1 (PRR FF2)

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

I’l somewhat dispute the sounds. While I never got to see an MILW “Joe” ins service, I did spend some time around the CSS&SB “800s” (don’t call them “Little Joes”). I even got a short ride around the Michigan City yard. The description of the  basic noises (compressor and gear noise) are fine, HOWEVER, these things have TREMENDOUS blowers. When hey get hot the thermostatic blowers cut in and ROAR like crazy. They'll blow small rocks around the track, and you cannot talk and be heard near the loco. The blowers are thermostatically controlled and spin up and down as cooling is needed. A “hot” loco parked in the yard would intermittently howl while totally unattended, until it cools off.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On May 6, 2020, at 6:11 PM, Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:

Yeah but... those are DC machines, so the only real sound is gear noise and the occasional clacking of the control contactors, much like a diesel as it makes transition. The GN Y-1s were AC machines with a big motor-generator set to supply DC to the traction motors. I would suspect it made a continuous monotonous drone, similar to traction motor blowers, but exactly what it sounded like is anybody's guess.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Accurate measured cutting of styrene sheets

Andy Carlson
 

I have found that dropping the blade handle super fast helps in getting less curl. Makes me fill like I am reinacting the French Revolution. I also place the cuts furthest out to where the blade is dropping down with less angle to the cut.

I will try an experiment where I am cutting a long, slim piece.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

On Wednesday, May 6, 2020, 4:35:29 PM PDT, Claus Schlund \(HGM\) <claus@...> wrote:


Hi Andy,
 
I have used a paper cutter in the past myself. One thing I found is that when cutting long narrow strips, there is a tendency for the styrene to develop a bit of a curl, and then it is difficult to use the strip as a long straight piece because the curl makes it want to lift up and/or not lay straight when used. Have you also had this experience? If so, how do you handle this?
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
From: Andy Carlson
Sent: Wednesday, May 06, 2020 5:38 PM
To: STMFC
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Accurate measured cutting of styrene sheets
 
I have acquired three paper cutters over the last 5 years. One was a little used large model with a cast steel slicer and a hard wood deck.
 
I have found myself using the cutter more and more for making styrene pieces. My go-to method in the past was to use a dedicated dial caliper with one of the jaw points sharpened. I could scribe a full length line by dragging the non-sharpened jaw along the styrene edge, with the other jaw leaving a nice line. Place an exacto knife point into the scribe, and place the metal straight edge up to the knife blade and an accurate cut was assured. I did have to make a cheat compensation from the measured to exact differences, which in my case 0.003".
 
Now I simply use the depth pointer on the dial caliper to extend the caliper from the cutting edge of the paper cutter and slide the styrene sheet to the blocking point of the depth gauge. Aligning the styrene to the square lines on the base platform keeps the squareness assured. The beauty of this is the measurements are exact!
 
Another beauty of this paper cutter is the nice, straight edges without any left behind relic items which need follow up attention. The accuracy I achieve is down to 0.001". I have cut up to 0.040" though I am concerned that perhaps thicker styrene may hasten the dulling of the steel blade.
 
I needed to make a scale 1/2 inch by 2 inch door track protector, which was 5 foot long, on a wooden box car. I needed to make 4 or more attempts to get the perfect cut, but I was super pleased with the results. With this small of a cut, I simply eyeballed the sizes and kept trying to get to where I was satisfied. For this door track piece, I sliced an Avery peel and stick address label. When finished with the slicing, I peeled off the backing and the tiny track strip went down with good adhesion. I am super pleased with the scale size and strength.
 
I am 68 years old and I am still learning and trying new ideas!
 
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Accurate measured cutting of styrene sheets

Richard Brennan
 

At 02:38 PM 5/6/2020, Andy Carlson wrote:
One was a little used large model with a cast steel slicer and a hard wood deck. <snip>
Agree 100%:
The most useful, albeit probably not the most important 'find' in my Mother's estate:
was the 19in by 19in Martin-Yale Premiere paper cutter with the green cross-hatched 3/4in wood base and HEAVY steel cutting edge.
From the back of the spring-loaded pivot to the end of the handle, the cutting arm is 27 inches long!
Finger guard? WHAT finger guard???

With the exception of corrugated cardboard and light foamcore... I don't cut more than 0.030 / 1/32 in.
It makes short and accurate work of anything rigid enough to align with the metal back fence;
including styrene, card stock, decal paper and up to 10 sheets of laser bond.

I need to be careful with glassine paper and tissue, as they tend to creep as the cut progresses...
but if I really needed them to be exact, I could just sandwich them between sheets of cover stock, and then cut.

The down-side; Taking-up nearly 4 square feet of flat surface.
The redemption, with the cutting arm down and secured, it fits vertically between the leg of a table and the wall!

Next time you see one... ask if it might be available!


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------


Re: Accurate measured cutting of styrene sheets

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi Andy,
 
I have used a paper cutter in the past myself. One thing I found is that when cutting long narrow strips, there is a tendency for the styrene to develop a bit of a curl, and then it is difficult to use the strip as a long straight piece because the curl makes it want to lift up and/or not lay straight when used. Have you also had this experience? If so, how do you handle this?
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

From: Andy Carlson
Sent: Wednesday, May 06, 2020 5:38 PM
To: STMFC
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Accurate measured cutting of styrene sheets
 
I have acquired three paper cutters over the last 5 years. One was a little used large model with a cast steel slicer and a hard wood deck.
 
I have found myself using the cutter more and more for making styrene pieces. My go-to method in the past was to use a dedicated dial caliper with one of the jaw points sharpened. I could scribe a full length line by dragging the non-sharpened jaw along the styrene edge, with the other jaw leaving a nice line. Place an exacto knife point into the scribe, and place the metal straight edge up to the knife blade and an accurate cut was assured. I did have to make a cheat compensation from the measured to exact differences, which in my case 0.003".
 
Now I simply use the depth pointer on the dial caliper to extend the caliper from the cutting edge of the paper cutter and slide the styrene sheet to the blocking point of the depth gauge. Aligning the styrene to the square lines on the base platform keeps the squareness assured. The beauty of this is the measurements are exact!
 
Another beauty of this paper cutter is the nice, straight edges without any left behind relic items which need follow up attention. The accuracy I achieve is down to 0.001". I have cut up to 0.040" though I am concerned that perhaps thicker styrene may hasten the dulling of the steel blade.
 
I needed to make a scale 1/2 inch by 2 inch door track protector, which was 5 foot long, on a wooden box car. I needed to make 4 or more attempts to get the perfect cut, but I was super pleased with the results. With this small of a cut, I simply eyeballed the sizes and kept trying to get to where I was satisfied. For this door track piece, I sliced an Avery peel and stick address label. When finished with the slicing, I peeled off the backing and the tiny track strip went down with good adhesion. I am super pleased with the scale size and strength.
 
I am 68 years old and I am still learning and trying new ideas!
 
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Accurate measured cutting of styrene sheets

Eric Hansmann
 

IIRC, Wayne Wesoloski had an article in RMC years ago that converted a disc blade paper cutter to work with sheet styrene. I do not remember the exact issue. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On May 6, 2020, at 5:25 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Andy, I totally agree. I liked my rotary paper cutter so much that I bought a larger one - 18". Blades can be replaced
when they wear out, so I don't worry about that.
_._,_._,_


Re: Accurate measured cutting of styrene sheets

Tim O'Connor
 


Andy, I totally agree. I liked my rotary paper cutter so much that I bought a larger one - 18". Blades can be replaced
when they wear out, so I don't worry about that.



On 5/6/2020 5:38 PM, Andy Carlson wrote:
I have acquired three paper cutters over the last 5 years. One was a little used large model with a cast steel slicer and a hard wood deck.

I have found myself using the cutter more and more for making styrene pieces. My go-to method in the past was to use a dedicated dial caliper with one of the jaw points sharpened. I could scribe a full length line by dragging the non-sharpened jaw along the styrene edge, with the other jaw leaving a nice line. Place an exacto knife point into the scribe, and place the metal straight edge up to the knife blade and an accurate cut was assured. I did have to make a cheat compensation from the measured to exact differences, which in my case 0.003".

Now I simply use the depth pointer on the dial caliper to extend the caliper from the cutting edge of the paper cutter and slide the styrene sheet to the blocking point of the depth gauge. Aligning the styrene to the square lines on the base platform keeps the squareness assured. The beauty of this is the measurements are exact!

Another beauty of this paper cutter is the nice, straight edges without any left behind relic items which need follow up attention. The accuracy I achieve is down to 0.001". I have cut up to 0.040" though I am concerned that perhaps thicker styrene may hasten the dulling of the steel blade.

I needed to make a scale 1/2 inch by 2 inch door track protector, which was 5 foot long, on a wooden box car. I needed to make 4 or more attempts to get the perfect cut, but I was super pleased with the results. With this small of a cut, I simply eyeballed the sizes and kept trying to get to where I was satisfied. For this door track piece, I sliced an Avery peel and stick address label. When finished with the slicing, I peeled off the backing and the tiny track strip went down with good adhesion. I am super pleased with the scale size and strength.

I am 68 years old and I am still learning and trying new ideas!

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Accurate measured cutting of styrene sheets

Rob & Bev Manley
 

Andy,
Some of the tricks we do are so matter of fact that we never think of passing it on to the rest of the group. When I've done my Pan Pastel clinics I am amazed at the questions that are asked. I am also honored that the group is asking me. I have a similar paper cutter from my printing days. I used mine to cut sheet lead harvested from a roof vent that came off my house. It was for my CB&Q coal gons. They were a perfect fit and all sides were square. 

Rob Manley
"Better modeling through personal embarrassment"


On Wednesday, May 6, 2020, 04:39:01 PM CDT, Andy Carlson <midcentury@...> wrote:


I have acquired three paper cutters over the last 5 years. One was a little used large model with a cast steel slicer and a hard wood deck.

I have found myself using the cutter more and more for making styrene pieces. My go-to method in the past was to use a dedicated dial caliper with one of the jaw points sharpened. I could scribe a full length line by dragging the non-sharpened jaw along the styrene edge, with the other jaw leaving a nice line. Place an exacto knife point into the scribe, and place the metal straight edge up to the knife blade and an accurate cut was assured. I did have to make a cheat compensation from the measured to exact differences, which in my case 0.003".

Now I simply use the depth pointer on the dial caliper to extend the caliper from the cutting edge of the paper cutter and slide the styrene sheet to the blocking point of the depth gauge. Aligning the styrene to the square lines on the base platform keeps the squareness assured. The beauty of this is the measurements are exact!

Another beauty of this paper cutter is the nice, straight edges without any left behind relic items which need follow up attention. The accuracy I achieve is down to 0.001". I have cut up to 0.040" though I am concerned that perhaps thicker styrene may hasten the dulling of the steel blade.

I needed to make a scale 1/2 inch by 2 inch door track protector, which was 5 foot long, on a wooden box car. I needed to make 4 or more attempts to get the perfect cut, but I was super pleased with the results. With this small of a cut, I simply eyeballed the sizes and kept trying to get to where I was satisfied. For this door track piece, I sliced an Avery peel and stick address label. When finished with the slicing, I peeled off the backing and the tiny track strip went down with good adhesion. I am super pleased with the scale size and strength.

I am 68 years old and I am still learning and trying new ideas!

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Tsunami sound for GN Y-1 (PRR FF2)

Dennis Storzek
 

Yeah but... those are DC machines, so the only real sound is gear noise and the occasional clacking of the control contactors, much like a diesel as it makes transition. The GN Y-1s were AC machines with a big motor-generator set to supply DC to the traction motors. I would suspect it made a continuous monotonous drone, similar to traction motor blowers, but exactly what it sounded like is anybody's guess.

Dennis Storzek

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