Date   

Re: Early TOFC question

Montford Switzer <ZOE@...>
 

Rich,

Try putting your 33 footers on the F-39. They should handle them since
they were designed for two 35 ft. trailers. Mine fit OK.

Mont Switzer

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
SUVCWORR@aol.com
Sent: Friday, November 11, 2005 11:32 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Early TOFC question

In a message dated 11/11/2005 9:30:22 PM Eastern Standard Time,
jabutler@sixy.com writes:
Please, Forgive my lack of knowledge on this. Does anyone know of an
HO flat car suitable for use as a TOFC car to be used with the Classic
Metal Works 33 ft. trailers? About when did railroads start putting
truck trailers on flat cars? Which railroads did it first?
Thanks for any help.
Jim B.
Forgeting the quality of the car, the Walthers PRR 75' alleged F39
(later the
initial TTX cars) were designed for the 32' trailers.

Rich Orr








Yahoo! Groups Links


NYC 1937 AAR boxcars, was Re: proportions of well-known freight cars

Mark Heiden
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@s...> wrote:
Perusing the Recapitulation of Freight Cars in my 1/1943 ORER for
1937 Design Boxcars for around 3,713 cubic foot capacity the NYC had
6,165 cars with 3,719' cubic capacity -

3) The RR with the most 1937 cars in the 1/1943 ORER was the NYC
with
9,645 (1,552 of 3,712 cf; 1,928 of 3,713'; and 6,165 of 3,719').
Hi Tim,

Are you sure that all these NYC boxcars are actually of the 1937 AAR
design? I was under the impression that NYC had only 1,073 of these
cars, series 157000-158072 built in 1942 as Lot 703-B.

Thanks,
Mark Heiden


Early TOFC

Rich Chapin <rwc27q@...>
 

Jim,

The Bowser F-30a 50' flat is good for conversion to the first PRR and LV pig flats, as that is what both these roads exactly did: convert an existing flat by adding the side rails, tie downs and end plates. The LV had AeroVans (although the LV were 33' 4") and AeroVans were commonly used as pig trailers. The M&StL is one that comes to mind.

"Early" is one of those relative terms. July 1954 is a key date (but late for the steam era), when six roads (LV, PRR, Erie, B&O, Wabash, NKP) started. The DL&W had started in June 1954. By the end of 54 more roads had joined in. The New Haven stated in the early 1930's and was handling 50,000 trailers a year by the mid-50s. The Chicago, North Shore & Milwaukee, an interurban, started 1926. The LIRR is generally credited as the first US road, handling farm wagons on flats in 1884. A Nova Scotia road was before the LIRR (forget name & date right now)

Search the archives for "steam era trailers on flat", "early piggyback cars", "40's and 50's trailers" and "steam era piggyback flatcars". There's a good amount of info on prototypes and models from prior discussions.

Take Care,
Rich Chapin


Re: proportions of well-known freight cars

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

I wrote:
Regarding boxcar building cycles, the year in which the greatest
boxcars
"installed" between 1926 & 1955 was 1941. There was a surge of
installations in 1940-1942 to prepare a little bit for the coming of WW
II. Without this surge, whether the 1937 AAR Design would have outsold
the 1932 Design is debatable.
Tony Thompson responded:


Adding up all the built numbers in Ted Culotta's book, the
1932 car sold a little under 15,000 cars altogether (even including the
WM cars of 1939 and 1942). Since SP all by itself bought about half
that number of 1937 cars, I'm skeptical of Tim's conclusion.
But as Tim says, a lot of the SP cars came in 1940-1942. I
guess a 1940 ORER would yield a good number of 3713 cubic feet,
all-steel 40-ft. cars for all roads, which could be compared to the
15,000 of the 1932 design.
I would not call my observation a conclusion as I stated the point "is debatable."

Perusing the Recapitulation of Freight Cars in my 1/1943 ORER for 1937 Design Boxcars for around 3,713 cubic foot capacity - the B&M and MEC had the runts of the litter (3,686') with their 600 cars built by Magor in early 1942 while the NYC had 6,165 cars with 3,719' cubic capacity - a total of 70,979 boxcars among 37 Class I US RR's had the dimensions of the 1937 Design:

3,686 cf 599
3,710 cf 2,734
3,712 cf 29,084
3,713 cf 22,627
3,714 cf 5,466
3,715 cf 2,896
3,716 cf 1,416
3,719 cf 6,165
Total 70,979

1) The above does not include 9,118 PRR X31's whose cubic capacity was 3,713'.

2) Included in the 7,796' line are 7,986 GN boxcars which may have been wood sheathed. These cars, however, built to the 1937 design's dimensions. The NP did not list any boxcars having 3,710 through 3,719 cubic capacities.

3) The RR with the most 1937 cars in the 1/1943 ORER was the NYC with 9,645 (1,552 of 3,712 cf; 1,928 of 3,713'; and 6,165 of 3,719'). Second was the SOU with 8,421 having 3,712 feet of capacity. Next was the GN with 7,986 albeit probably wood sheathed. In fourth place came the SP-Pac Lines with 7,218 of the 3,713' variety (the T&NO had another 750 of the 3,712' and 98 of the 3,714' varieties).

The question remains - how many of these boxcars would have been built if WW II had not been looming? That's a question and not a conclusion.

Tim Gilbert


Re: proportions of well-known freight cars

Tony Thompson
 

Tim Gilbert wrote:
Regarding boxcar building cycles, the year in which the greatest boxcars
"installed" between 1926 & 1955 was 1941. There was a surge of
installations in 1940-1942 to prepare a little bit for the coming of WW
II. Without this surge, whether the 1937 AAR Design would have outsold
the 1932 Design is debatable.
Adding up all the built numbers in Ted Culotta's book, the 1932 car sold a little under 15,000 cars altogether (even including the WM cars of 1939 and 1942). Since SP all by itself bought about half that number of 1937 cars, I'm skeptical of Tim's conclusion.
But as Tim says, a lot of the SP cars came in 1940-1942. I guess a 1940 ORER would yield a good number of 3713 cubic feet, all-steel 40-ft. cars for all roads, which could be compared to the 15,000 of the 1932 design.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: proportions of well-known freight cars

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:


Tony Thompson wrote

.... several of the Western roads which served extensive timber country
continued to patronize their on-line lumber sources, as GN and NP (among
others) clearly stated;
And I think the same idea applies to PRR -- they served the steel makers,
and they wanted to please their biggest customers by buying steel cars.

I suspect the wood cars were less expensive in the 1920's which is when
PRR and NYC were buying huge numbers of all steel cars, while most western
roads were happy with steel framed cars. Buying dropped off sharply for a
number of years in the 1930's and was low prior to 1946, so the early
1950's reflects the buying decisions of the 1920's.
Regarding boxcar building cycles, the year in which the greatest boxcars "installed" between 1926 & 1955 was 1941. There was a surge of installations in 1940-1942 to prepare a little bit for the coming of WW II. Without this surge, whether the 1937 AAR Design would have outsold the 1932 Design is debatable.

The total boxcars "installed" between 1926 and 1955 was about 662,000 boxcars - the number of boxcars in the US Class I RR fleet was almost 719,000. If it is assumed that none of these 1926-1955 installations had been wrecked or retired, then 51,000 cars in the 1955 were built before 1926.

I found a better definition of boxcars installed during a year: - it has three components:

1) New units acquired which included new units purchased or built in company shops and new units leased from others.
2) Units rebuilt and rewritten into a property account - this I assume occurred after the IRS deemed that the cost of major rebuilding of cars had to be capitalized versus being expensed immediately. This, I believe, happened right after WW II if I remember the statement in PACIFIC FRUIT EXPRESS correctly.
3) All other which includes other than new units leased from others - sale/leasebacks.

Tim Gilbert


Ebay listings

Rob Sarberenyi <espeef5@...>
 

I posted additional items to my listings on Ebay, including freight cars for MILW, WP and other roads; also some magazine back issues containing articles of interest
http://stores.ebay.com/Espee-F-5

More items added every week...


Rob Sarberenyi
espeef5@pacbell.net


Re: Calling a spade a club

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Standing way out to the side trying to figure out how UP or Pullman painted
LW sleepers in 1948, I glanced over and noticed a great deal of activity at
the STMFC booth. Wondering about it, I came over.

So...disagreement about terms...again. It IS a mildly interesting
subject...IMO. I'll offer a view AND one historical fact. First, I'm going
to bet...not much but still a bet...that few on here would write a book and
refer to a box car as a PS-0....even though they might happily refer to it
as such here. The reason probably is that when we go out past this and other
internet forums we put our reputations on the line. Accuracy seems to be a
mite bit more important in that case. Here...perhaps regretfully...I believe
we tend to act like we are talking only within the confines of a small
club...perhaps overlooking the fact that we have 1078 members. This view of mine is, of course, merely a theory.

There are/were definitely different "terminology" used in the RR industry,
the one used by operating crews was somewhat different from that of the
mechanical depts and with good reason. A term used in engineering design in
the mechanical dept might have to be more precise than that used by an
operating crew. Hence, the crew might have developed a shorter, easier to
remember or use term. In the modeling community, the same thing might occur.
If a modeler needs a term to describe a particular frt car item and there is
not one that he is aware of, he might well generate one himself. Thus, the modeling community has terms such Phase I, II, III etc for various locomotives such as F-3 units. Heck, I even defined various phases to describe UP models of Big Boys imported by Key. It has to be realized and
remembered, however, that the term only applies in the modeling community.
Is this inconvenient? You bet, but it's still practical I think.

I will note that, several yrs ago, I proposed that the STMFC generate a
standard to describe a box car end. Hence, 7/8 would be standardized so that
the 7 was the number of ribs on the upper part of a box car end, 8 the lower
part. I also proposed that we define a standard method to describe steel box car doors. I was somewhat surprised to find less than startling support for my notion. In fact, a certain unnamed member...with an Irish sounding name...was opposed
to the group establishing such a standard <g>.

Obviously, model RRing is a hobby/discipline/activity driven by real RR processes and activities but it has its own needs for clarification and descriptions, many of which are unknown in the real RR world. There are, of course, many, many examples of terms that exist in the real RR world and I would submit that we should use them when they ARE known and usable. However, just as the new activity...computer/software...developed its own jargon even though it served a longtime encamped engineering or accounting field, so should MRing be allowed to develop ITS own jargon WHEN necessary to provide needed descriptions. The problem lurking out there, of course, is WHAT jargon? And, which terminology should it borrow from, RR engineering depts or operations?

Mike Brock....running for my bunker


Early TOFC question

h8fan <jabutler@...>
 

Please, Forgive my lack of knowledge on this. Does anyone know of an
HO flat car suitable for use as a TOFC car to be used with the Classic
Metal Works 33 ft. trailers? About when did railroads start putting
truck trailers on flat cars? Which railroads did it first?
Thanks for any help.
Jim B.


Re: proportions of well-known freight cars

Tim O'Connor
 

Tony Thompson wrote

.... several of the Western roads which served extensive timber country
continued to patronize their on-line lumber sources, as GN and NP (among
others) clearly stated;
And I think the same idea applies to PRR -- they served the steel makers,
and they wanted to please their biggest customers by buying steel cars.

I suspect the wood cars were less expensive in the 1920's which is when
PRR and NYC were buying huge numbers of all steel cars, while most western
roads were happy with steel framed cars. Buying dropped off sharply for a
number of years in the 1930's and was low prior to 1946, so the early
1950's reflects the buying decisions of the 1920's. I think those are the
cars that are lacking from most HO layouts (except for the ARA/X29 cars).
I think when Athearn buys Accurail :-) then we'll see a lot more, better
paint schemes for their numerous wood kits.

Tim O'Connor


Re: Mobil Gas Tank Car Photo

proto48er
 

I have another question about the Mobilgas tank car - what COLORS was
it painted? Looks to me like the tank is red, except where the
lettering "Mobilgas" is - that looks black. Lettering looks to be
silver. Any comments?

Was the car just partially repainted so that the Mobilgas lettering
could be applied?

Thanks in advance! A.T. Kott


Re: proportions of well-known freight cars

Tony Thompson
 

The preponderance of steel cars in the East really had more to do with the
cash generating capacity of the Eastern railroads in the 1920's. They were
the proverbial "cash cows" in that era and could afford to replace equipment
on a 10 to 15 year cycle. The Depression ended all that.
No argument. But there is at least one other factor: several of the Western roads which served extensive timber country continued to patronize their on-line lumber sources, as GN and NP (among others) clearly stated; and well into the 1960s, SP was specifying "Oregon yellow pine" for box car linings in otherwise all-steel cars.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: proportions of well-known freight cars

Greg Bartek
 

Referencing the road that I model, the Lehigh & New England RR rostered
1205 box cars as of January 1957. Their proportions were:

ARA/X29 type: 732
PS-1: 300
Single sheathed/outside braced: 170

It must be noted that from the onset, the L&NE started out with 199 of
this type of steel-framed box car in 1925. By January of '58, all but
one were gone. That's 30+ years of service in the Eastern PA region.

Modeling-wise, this wooden/OB box car is very similar to the Accurail
7000 series offering.

BTW, great topic!
Greg Bartek


Re: proportions of well-known freight cars

Gregg Mahlkov <mahlkov@...>
 

Elden,

In the case of the PRR, it was the fact that PRR went to all steel boxcars earlier than most other roads. For the first 15 years of the 20th century, PRR turned out vast numbers of XL 36 foot d.s. boxcars. it then turned to the s.s. X23 forty footer and was assigned a couple of thousand USRA s.s. cars, which it referred to as X26. By the mid-1920's PRR embarked on a program to replace all the XL's with X29's and effectively had the XL off the revenue roster by 1935. By the end of WW II, many of the X29's were candidates for rebuilding.

As you well know, Pennsy always "marched to a different drummer".

The preponderance of steel cars in the East really had more to do with the cash generating capacity of the Eastern railroads in the 1920's. They were the proverbial "cash cows" in that era and could afford to replace equipment on a 10 to 15 year cycle. The Depression ended all that.

Gregg Mahlkov

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gatwood, Elden" <Elden.Gatwood@hdrinc.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, November 11, 2005 6:03 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] proportions of well-known freight cars


Tim O.;
Thanks for all that additional info, too. I appreciate the facts.

These ARE the kind of numbers, and hence, statistics we need. I also
appreciate all the statistics that Tim G. has furnished, as it all
clears the picture considerably.

All still (unaccountably) interested;

So, if GN, NP, C&NW and SP still had significant numbers of
steel-underframed wooden-sheathed box cars into the late 50's, what
other roads might have still rostered a good number of similar cars?
Did the Wabash double door single-sheathed cars last into the 60's? I
recall that there were also a significant number of CP double doors,
too.

Why do you think that these are under-represented on layouts/fleets? Is
it the difficulty painting them well? Honestly, now! Finding models?
Or, are folks just generally unaware of how to (or the need to) balance
their fleets to deal with this subject? Given just the difficulty
establishing a good balance of road names, do you think the latter is
most likely?

So, using that 1954 date, if we were to say that slightly less than 50%,
say 48% of all boxcars were post-war all-steel boxcars, and another
roughly 34% (82% - 48%) were pre-war all-steel cars like the ARA '32,
'37, X29 and such, what do you suppose the remainder (~18%) were
composed of, and what models would represent this large group, aside
from those roads you mentioned?

Do you think there was a western bias to the presence of wood? Would
you think that this all-steel to SUF ratio would tend to be skewed to
the right (more wooden) on western, particularly northwestern roads, and
skewed to the left (all-steel) on eastern roads? Any feel for the
situation in the southeast?

I certainly notice the rarity of non-all-steel cars in yard shots in the
east, even in earlier periods. For instance, my counts in PRR yard
shots of the late 50's/early 60's yields a far lesser number of cars
with wood sheathing; certainly less than 5%. Was the retirement of
wooden sheathed cars in the east in any way related to usage and repair
frequency, as climate seems to be less of an issue than cost of wood to
the RR? As example, on the PRR, wooden-sheathed cars got a quick exit
out the door, while X29s (unpopular as they were) got a long lease on
life. In general, volumetric capacity was similar. It had to be
related to economics, and not just interchange longevity. Maintenance
cost?

Sorry for all the questions, but I find this subject ripe for
discussion.

Have a good weekend, all.

Elden Gatwood



-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Tim O'Connor
Sent: Friday, November 11, 2005 7:45 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] proportions of well-known freight cars

Elden wrote

Year Total All-Steel SUF "Other"
1954 719,918 81.7% 18.1% 0.2%

I am astounded by the presence of 18.1% steel underframed (and
presumably wooden sheathed) cars in 1954! I would have figured
it to be far less.

Elden,

There were many thousands in service well into the late 1960's.
The GN, NP, C&NW and others bought many modern composite cars in
the late 30's and 1940's (some barely 10 years old in 1954). Also
there were thousands of very viable cars built in the 1920's
that were still around in the 1950's into the 1960's.

For example, NP lists 984 "steel underframe" War Emergency cars
in the 1959 ORER. A quick scan of the NP's 1959 roster shows at
least 5,000 / closer to 6,000 "steel underframe" box cars in
service. That means for every 15 PS-1's on a 1959 era layout
there might have to be 1 NP SUF box car! (Unfortunately there
are not kits for all of the NP classes.) SP also had hundreds
of un-rebuilt SUF box cars in 1959.

I do agree with you Elden that 1950's modelers generally do not
have enough wood sheathed box cars on their layouts. Thankfully
the resin car makers have been working to rectify this!

Tim O'Connor






Yahoo! Groups Links








Re: Early TOFC question

SUVCWORR@...
 

In a message dated 11/11/2005 9:30:22 PM Eastern Standard Time,
jabutler@sixy.com writes:
Please, Forgive my lack of knowledge on this. Does anyone know of an
HO flat car suitable for use as a TOFC car to be used with the Classic
Metal Works 33 ft. trailers? About when did railroads start putting
truck trailers on flat cars? Which railroads did it first?
Thanks for any help.
Jim B.
Forgeting the quality of the car, the Walthers PRR 75' alleged F39 (later the
initial TTX cars) were designed for the 32' trailers.

Rich Orr


Re: proportions of well-known freight cars

Gatwood, Elden <Elden.Gatwood@...>
 

Tim O.;
Thanks for all that additional info, too. I appreciate the facts.

These ARE the kind of numbers, and hence, statistics we need. I also
appreciate all the statistics that Tim G. has furnished, as it all
clears the picture considerably.

All still (unaccountably) interested;

So, if GN, NP, C&NW and SP still had significant numbers of
steel-underframed wooden-sheathed box cars into the late 50's, what
other roads might have still rostered a good number of similar cars?
Did the Wabash double door single-sheathed cars last into the 60's? I
recall that there were also a significant number of CP double doors,
too.

Why do you think that these are under-represented on layouts/fleets? Is
it the difficulty painting them well? Honestly, now! Finding models?
Or, are folks just generally unaware of how to (or the need to) balance
their fleets to deal with this subject? Given just the difficulty
establishing a good balance of road names, do you think the latter is
most likely?

So, using that 1954 date, if we were to say that slightly less than 50%,
say 48% of all boxcars were post-war all-steel boxcars, and another
roughly 34% (82% - 48%) were pre-war all-steel cars like the ARA '32,
'37, X29 and such, what do you suppose the remainder (~18%) were
composed of, and what models would represent this large group, aside
from those roads you mentioned?

Do you think there was a western bias to the presence of wood? Would
you think that this all-steel to SUF ratio would tend to be skewed to
the right (more wooden) on western, particularly northwestern roads, and
skewed to the left (all-steel) on eastern roads? Any feel for the
situation in the southeast?

I certainly notice the rarity of non-all-steel cars in yard shots in the
east, even in earlier periods. For instance, my counts in PRR yard
shots of the late 50's/early 60's yields a far lesser number of cars
with wood sheathing; certainly less than 5%. Was the retirement of
wooden sheathed cars in the east in any way related to usage and repair
frequency, as climate seems to be less of an issue than cost of wood to
the RR? As example, on the PRR, wooden-sheathed cars got a quick exit
out the door, while X29s (unpopular as they were) got a long lease on
life. In general, volumetric capacity was similar. It had to be
related to economics, and not just interchange longevity. Maintenance
cost?

Sorry for all the questions, but I find this subject ripe for
discussion.

Have a good weekend, all.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Tim O'Connor
Sent: Friday, November 11, 2005 7:45 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] proportions of well-known freight cars

Elden wrote

Year Total All-Steel SUF "Other"
1954 719,918 81.7% 18.1% 0.2%

I am astounded by the presence of 18.1% steel underframed (and
presumably wooden sheathed) cars in 1954! I would have figured
it to be far less.

Elden,

There were many thousands in service well into the late 1960's.
The GN, NP, C&NW and others bought many modern composite cars in
the late 30's and 1940's (some barely 10 years old in 1954). Also
there were thousands of very viable cars built in the 1920's
that were still around in the 1950's into the 1960's.

For example, NP lists 984 "steel underframe" War Emergency cars
in the 1959 ORER. A quick scan of the NP's 1959 roster shows at
least 5,000 / closer to 6,000 "steel underframe" box cars in
service. That means for every 15 PS-1's on a 1959 era layout
there might have to be 1 NP SUF box car! (Unfortunately there
are not kits for all of the NP classes.) SP also had hundreds
of un-rebuilt SUF box cars in 1959.

I do agree with you Elden that 1950's modelers generally do not
have enough wood sheathed box cars on their layouts. Thankfully
the resin car makers have been working to rectify this!

Tim O'Connor


Re: CGW PS-2

SamClarke
 

Hello Phil Buckwald,

I was waiting for Gene Green to answer this but since we are working on a
continuing line of PS-2s we have a bit of info to pass along, some of it
from Gene.

The CGW PS-2s you are looking at were black with aluminum stenciling. The
black was not paint but actually the same car cement used on ends and roofs
of box cars.

Sam Clarke
Kadee Quality Products

----- Original Message -----
From: "buchwaldfam" <duff@gmavt.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, November 11, 2005 8:52 AM
Subject: [STMFC] CGW PS-2


There's a good builder's photo of a CGW PS-2 in an old RMJ. The car
is a dark color, but the photo is b&w. Were these cars black or some
oxide red color? The car body seems to match the truck color.

Thanks in advance!
Phil Buchwald







Yahoo! Groups Links






Re: Mobil Gas Tank Car Photo

Gregg Mahlkov <mahlkov@...>
 

Tony,

If the method satisfied the WWIB inspector, that is all that was needed. When I first statrted with the AN in 1981, the SWIB inspector used to come by periodically. He was an old hand that had the job since just after WWII. He told me of some "creative" ways of determining weights minus a scale.

Seriously, if the inspector felt that the shipper was not trying to cheat the railroad and overload the cars - the other reason to weigh loads, he would certify "eyeballed" weights for bulk and liquid commodities.

I was also TM for St. Joe Paper, which owned the AN, and St. Joe weighed its pulpboard under an SWA, because we regularly skated with the load limit on 70 ton boxcars.

Gregg Mahlkov

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tony Thompson" <thompsonmarytony@sbcglobal.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, November 11, 2005 2:05 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Mobil Gas Tank Car Photo


Gregg Mahlkov wrote:
Quite evidently the Signal Hill Refinery had a Shippers Weight
Agreement
with the WWIB, which would send an inspector around periodically to
check
the accuracy of their scale or meter, in that case.
The existence of an SWA seems logical. But there was no meter:
the cars were filled by eyeball to be shell full, according to what I
was told. While loading, they kept a list of the cars, and noted the
stenciled gallons capacity as well as car number and reporting mark,
for each car.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history





Yahoo! Groups Links







Re: Mobil Gas Tank Car Photo

Tim O'Connor
 

Tony, I'm sure eyeballing is exactly how many cars were loaded and
continue to be... I think I've told here about watching a truck pumping
cement from a covered hopper. He placed a gauge under the truck at
a preset height, and when the bottom of the truck reached the top of
the gauge, the truck was full (at max allowed weight).

Tim O.

The existence of an SWA seems logical. But there was no meter:
the cars were filled by eyeball to be shell full, according to what I
was told.


Re: Calling a spade a club (part deux)

Tim O'Connor
 

Pat Wider mysteriously wrote

So why not simply call it a "PSCM Corrugated Steel End"?
The big mystery has now been solved for all time.
Ummm, Pat,

Isn't that what Ed suggested yesterday, and which more than one
person here besides me has noted is a completely non-descriptive
description???

You could write "Standard Railway Equipment Corrugated End" as
well, to describe 46 different variations of that design. Of what use
is such a description? Answer: None whatever. That's why nobody
uses such terms -- they use shorthand notations like "IDE-2" or
"R+3/4 Rolling Pin" etc etc. In fact, you and Ed both have devised
and published such model-railroad oriented, made-up descriptions.

Why did you do it Pat? That's the mystery.

Tim O'Connor

134701 - 134720 of 182364