Date   

Re: Sergent Couplers (was coupler debate)

Jim Pickett
 

Hmmmm. Why couldn't you replace the ball with a polarized magnet? That way you could hold a wand polarized in the opposite direction UNDER the coupler and it would repel and lift the ball. You could also have an electromagnet under the track also polarized oppositely. The coupler might have to be modified slightly so the ball wouldn't simply turn over. Perhaps replace it with a slightly cylindrical magnet.

Jim Pickett

timboconnor@comcast.net wrote:
Yes, but the electromagnet would have to be OVER the track.

The Sergent coupler has a tiny metal ball inside that acts like
the locking pin on the prototype. It has to move upwards to
unlock the knuckle.


Jim Pickett


Re: Sergent Couplers

Patrick Wider <pwider@...>
 

Hi Dave,

I was thinking of two facing cars, apart some distance, with their knuckles still closed. So,
like the prototype, I'd have to open one of them to allow them to couple as opposed to
uncoupling them. So I have to hold the wand with one hand and hold the dentil pick with
the other while leaning over my layout. All the while not snagging the wires on the scale
telephone poles.

Pat Wider

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tangerine Flyer <tangerine_flyer@s...> wrote:

Hi Pat,

Not quite... Like a prototype coupler, when the
locking mechanism is lifted the knuckle is free to
open when the engineer pulls away. Also like a
prototype coupler, you *may* run into a recalcitrant
knuckle that doesn't want to open freely. So, to
continue our prototype analogy, do what you must to
break the joint and send it to the RIP track for
maintenance.

Best regards,

David E. Jobe, Sr.
St. Ann, Missouri


--- Patrick Wider <pwider@s...> wrote:


---------------------------------
Tom,

If I understand you correctly, after application of
the magnetic wand held above the
coupler or a surplus super-conducting collider magnet
held even higher, one still has to
get access to the Sergent coupler's knuckle with a
Howard Hughes' finger nail, dentil pick,
or bent paper clip to open it? Is this how they work?
Man Oh Man. What a handy workable
design! At least it would eliminate the need for a
"scale clock". Thanks for the engineering
analysis!!!!!

Pat Wider


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas M. Olsen"
<tmolsen@U...> wrote:

List,

In mid-June, I purchased a set of assembled Sargent
Couplers
(#EC87A-125) along with the Magnetic Uncoupling
Wand. The price for the
two items with shipping was $18.00. You get five
assembled Type "E"
couplers. They work very well and are smaller in
size than the Kadee
#58s. Even though I have not had the opportunity
to mount them in a
piece of rolling stock, I was able to test how they
work. These
couplers are all-metal and are a dark reddish-brown
in color which at a
distance make the coupler look as if it were covered
with rust.

In reality, they operate just like the prototype.
They have a spring
located in the shank ahead of the mounting hole like
the MKD-4 Kadee to
absorb the shock when the coupling is made. After
uncoupling, they,
like the prototype do not return to center as the
Kadee and other HO
couplers available do. They do not mate with other
knuckle couplers due
to the size difference between a proto-87 coupler
and the present
couplers available with the exception of the cast
dummy couplers. The
manufacturer advises that with a little filling on
the dummy coupler
knuckle, they will couple. To couple, they, like
their prototype
cousins require the services of a brakeman to align
the coupler and if
necessary to open one of the knuckles if both are
closed. They will
couple if only one is open and both are properly
aligned. The present
information sheet from Sergent advises that the
current offerings are to
retrofit existing equipment. It is possible that
they may offer draft
gear boxes in the future as they said "Stay Tuned!'

This coupler position and open/closed knuckle
situation could be a
problem for anyone who has a fairly large hump,
staging or flat switched
yard or any other location where the benchwork edge
is more than an arms
length or the track centers are close at a distance
with rolling stock
close on adjacent tracks. The distance benchwork
edge to track
situation is going to be the determining factor as
to whether anyone
will want to use these for operations, or just buy
them for display
purposes in shows and contests. You have to be able
to place the
magnetic wand over top of the coupler head to raise
the steel ball out
of it's slot in the locking block in the coupler
shank. This allows the
knuckle to open. When the knuckle closes, the steel
ball drops back
into it's place and locks the knuckle closed. The
prototype couplers
are designed the same way, except there is no steel
ball to raise, just
the locking block which is actuated by the raising
(or lowering,
depending on whether they are over or under-slung)
of the cutting lever
on the car end. In an earlier discussion regarding
the operation of
couplers, it was Larry Jackman who addressed the
operation as to how
couplers lock and what has to occur to allow them to
open. Many thanks
Larry, for making this clear to many who have not
had the on the ground
experience in this area.

The ability to open them when they are mounted on
passenger equipment
with diaphragms is a valid point. As Tim O'Connor
mentioned, the
possible use of anisotropic magnets mounted on a
wand designed for this
use and also mounted on an extended wand for
distances would solve the
problems in both the passenger and freight
situations. In regard to the
comment that the couplers have to be filed down to
fit present draft
gear boxes: there was no mention of this in the
paperwork that
accompanied the set that I received.

I'm sure that we all will be interested in what
Jared Harper's results
as he begins to test these couplers in actual
service. The big bugaboo
will be the ability to reach the cars and accurately
get the wand into
position to uncouple the cars, or to be able to
align couplers with the
cars buried in a yard more than two feet from the
benchwork end. This
will really be a test of skill when humping cars, as
you will only have
seconds to lift ball to uncouple the cars as they go
over the hump or to
uncouple rear-end helpers on the fly. Most fellows
that I know will not
use these couplers as they require the operator to
get more involved in
the actual work of making and breaking up of trains
and in switching
operations. The magnetic couplers in use today
allow us to move along
quickly in an operating session, while use of the
Sergent couplers will
bring us back to reality as nothing moves fast in
actual railroad
switching and in train make-up and break-up
operations. Just like the
Army - "Hurry Up and Wait!

But, for display and contest purposes, they cannot
be beat! Hopefully,
Sergent will offer a scale draft gear box to make
this superbly scaled
coupler. Do not get me wrong, the Quad 58/78 is a
tremendous
improvement over the earlier #5 and I will use them
until the Sargent is
proved to be good in operation and the problems are
solved. Whether
they are depends on what others find when they use
them. Jared, please
keep us up on what you find as it will be greatly
appreciated!

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@u...





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Travel trailer insurance
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Travel medical insurance
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---------------------------------


Re: Sergent Couplers

Tim O'Connor
 

http://www.irritatedvowel.com/Railroad/Details/Couplers/Default.aspx

Pat, from what I understand, the magnet raises the ball and a
pick of some kind moves the knuckle. (Everyone at the club uses
a pick to uncouple Kadees, because the magnets either don't work
or they're not located in the right spot, so I don't see this as much
of a change.)

Once the knuckle is open, it stays open, until another coupler comes
along and closes it, just like the prototype. So except for the diaphragm
issue (which goes away if one only uses Sergents on FREIGHT cars)
I don't see much practical difference compared to Kadees. (And most
layouts don't have hump yards either.)

Sergents are probably what I'll put in the front coupler position of my
brass steam engines, which have no provision for Kadees or any other
working front coupler.

Tim O.

If I understand you correctly, after application of the magnetic wand held above the
coupler or a surplus super-conducting collider magnet held even higher, one still has to
get access to the Sergent coupler's knuckle with a Howard Hughes' finger nail, dentil pick,
or bent paper clip to open it? Is this how they work? Man Oh Man. What a handy workable
design! At least it would eliminate the need for a "scale clock". Thanks for the engineering
analysis!!!!! Pat Wider


Re: Sergent Couplers

David Jobe, Sr.
 

Hi Pat,

Not quite... Like a prototype coupler, when the
locking mechanism is lifted the knuckle is free to
open when the engineer pulls away. Also like a
prototype coupler, you *may* run into a recalcitrant
knuckle that doesn't want to open freely. So, to
continue our prototype analogy, do what you must to
break the joint and send it to the RIP track for
maintenance.

Best regards,

David E. Jobe, Sr.
St. Ann, Missouri


--- Patrick Wider <pwider@sbcglobal.net> wrote:


---------------------------------
Tom,

If I understand you correctly, after application of
the magnetic wand held above the
coupler or a surplus super-conducting collider magnet
held even higher, one still has to
get access to the Sergent coupler's knuckle with a
Howard Hughes' finger nail, dentil pick,
or bent paper clip to open it? Is this how they work?
Man Oh Man. What a handy workable
design! At least it would eliminate the need for a
"scale clock". Thanks for the engineering
analysis!!!!!

Pat Wider


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas M. Olsen"
<tmolsen@U...> wrote:

List,

In mid-June, I purchased a set of assembled Sargent
Couplers
(#EC87A-125) along with the Magnetic Uncoupling
Wand. The price for the
two items with shipping was $18.00. You get five
assembled Type "E"
couplers. They work very well and are smaller in
size than the Kadee
#58s. Even though I have not had the opportunity
to mount them in a
piece of rolling stock, I was able to test how they
work. These
couplers are all-metal and are a dark reddish-brown
in color which at a
distance make the coupler look as if it were covered
with rust.

In reality, they operate just like the prototype.
They have a spring
located in the shank ahead of the mounting hole like
the MKD-4 Kadee to
absorb the shock when the coupling is made. After
uncoupling, they,
like the prototype do not return to center as the
Kadee and other HO
couplers available do. They do not mate with other
knuckle couplers due
to the size difference between a proto-87 coupler
and the present
couplers available with the exception of the cast
dummy couplers. The
manufacturer advises that with a little filling on
the dummy coupler
knuckle, they will couple. To couple, they, like
their prototype
cousins require the services of a brakeman to align
the coupler and if
necessary to open one of the knuckles if both are
closed. They will
couple if only one is open and both are properly
aligned. The present
information sheet from Sergent advises that the
current offerings are to
retrofit existing equipment. It is possible that
they may offer draft
gear boxes in the future as they said "Stay Tuned!'

This coupler position and open/closed knuckle
situation could be a
problem for anyone who has a fairly large hump,
staging or flat switched
yard or any other location where the benchwork edge
is more than an arms
length or the track centers are close at a distance
with rolling stock
close on adjacent tracks. The distance benchwork
edge to track
situation is going to be the determining factor as
to whether anyone
will want to use these for operations, or just buy
them for display
purposes in shows and contests. You have to be able
to place the
magnetic wand over top of the coupler head to raise
the steel ball out
of it's slot in the locking block in the coupler
shank. This allows the
knuckle to open. When the knuckle closes, the steel
ball drops back
into it's place and locks the knuckle closed. The
prototype couplers
are designed the same way, except there is no steel
ball to raise, just
the locking block which is actuated by the raising
(or lowering,
depending on whether they are over or under-slung)
of the cutting lever
on the car end. In an earlier discussion regarding
the operation of
couplers, it was Larry Jackman who addressed the
operation as to how
couplers lock and what has to occur to allow them to
open. Many thanks
Larry, for making this clear to many who have not
had the on the ground
experience in this area.

The ability to open them when they are mounted on
passenger equipment
with diaphragms is a valid point. As Tim O'Connor
mentioned, the
possible use of anisotropic magnets mounted on a
wand designed for this
use and also mounted on an extended wand for
distances would solve the
problems in both the passenger and freight
situations. In regard to the
comment that the couplers have to be filed down to
fit present draft
gear boxes: there was no mention of this in the
paperwork that
accompanied the set that I received.

I'm sure that we all will be interested in what
Jared Harper's results
as he begins to test these couplers in actual
service. The big bugaboo
will be the ability to reach the cars and accurately
get the wand into
position to uncouple the cars, or to be able to
align couplers with the
cars buried in a yard more than two feet from the
benchwork end. This
will really be a test of skill when humping cars, as
you will only have
seconds to lift ball to uncouple the cars as they go
over the hump or to
uncouple rear-end helpers on the fly. Most fellows
that I know will not
use these couplers as they require the operator to
get more involved in
the actual work of making and breaking up of trains
and in switching
operations. The magnetic couplers in use today
allow us to move along
quickly in an operating session, while use of the
Sergent couplers will
bring us back to reality as nothing moves fast in
actual railroad
switching and in train make-up and break-up
operations. Just like the
Army - "Hurry Up and Wait!

But, for display and contest purposes, they cannot
be beat! Hopefully,
Sergent will offer a scale draft gear box to make
this superbly scaled
coupler. Do not get me wrong, the Quad 58/78 is a
tremendous
improvement over the earlier #5 and I will use them
until the Sargent is
proved to be good in operation and the problems are
solved. Whether
they are depends on what others find when they use
them. Jared, please
keep us up on what you find as it will be greatly
appreciated!

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@u...





SPONSORED LINKS

Worldwide travel insurance
Travel trailer insurance
International travel insurance

Travel insurance usa
Travel medical insurance
Csa travel insurance


---------------------------------
YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


Visit your group "STMFC" on the web.

To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
Terms of Service.


---------------------------------


Re: Couplers, Coupler Pockets, and Trucks

Patrick Wider <pwider@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "S. Busch" <SCSBusch@W...> wrote:

When I cut my teeth in model railroading, American Flyer had chrome plated
journal boxes on sheet steel sideframe trucks.
My first experience was with nickel-plated rails - three of them with 27" diameter curves.

The first time I ever saw
real looking truck they were HO sprung Varneys or Athearns or something.
Me too!

I have never quite recovered, and still prefer real springs.
I'd prefer real prototype springs but I don't think they'd fit plus they'd collapse my
benchwork. (-:}

Pat Wider


Re: Were there 10' IH 50' 1937 AAR DD boxcars?

Patrick Wider <pwider@...>
 

I forgot to mention that AF-1's were numbered 11000-11699. FYI: I'm doing an article on
the SAL turtle-back cars for RP CYC Vol. 13.

Pat Wider

AF-2's were numbered 11700-11999 and 22000-22199.

A-1's were numbered 9011-9060.

Pat Wider


Re: Sergent Couplers

Patrick Wider <pwider@...>
 

Tom,

If I understand you correctly, after application of the magnetic wand held above the
coupler or a surplus super-conducting collider magnet held even higher, one still has to
get access to the Sergent coupler's knuckle with a Howard Hughes' finger nail, dentil pick,
or bent paper clip to open it? Is this how they work? Man Oh Man. What a handy workable
design! At least it would eliminate the need for a "scale clock". Thanks for the engineering
analysis!!!!!

Pat Wider

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas M. Olsen" <tmolsen@U...> wrote:

List,

In mid-June, I purchased a set of assembled Sargent Couplers
(#EC87A-125) along with the Magnetic Uncoupling Wand. The price for the
two items with shipping was $18.00. You get five assembled Type "E"
couplers. They work very well and are smaller in size than the Kadee
#58s. Even though I have not had the opportunity to mount them in a
piece of rolling stock, I was able to test how they work. These
couplers are all-metal and are a dark reddish-brown in color which at a
distance make the coupler look as if it were covered with rust.

In reality, they operate just like the prototype. They have a spring
located in the shank ahead of the mounting hole like the MKD-4 Kadee to
absorb the shock when the coupling is made. After uncoupling, they,
like the prototype do not return to center as the Kadee and other HO
couplers available do. They do not mate with other knuckle couplers due
to the size difference between a proto-87 coupler and the present
couplers available with the exception of the cast dummy couplers. The
manufacturer advises that with a little filling on the dummy coupler
knuckle, they will couple. To couple, they, like their prototype
cousins require the services of a brakeman to align the coupler and if
necessary to open one of the knuckles if both are closed. They will
couple if only one is open and both are properly aligned. The present
information sheet from Sergent advises that the current offerings are to
retrofit existing equipment. It is possible that they may offer draft
gear boxes in the future as they said "Stay Tuned!'

This coupler position and open/closed knuckle situation could be a
problem for anyone who has a fairly large hump, staging or flat switched
yard or any other location where the benchwork edge is more than an arms
length or the track centers are close at a distance with rolling stock
close on adjacent tracks. The distance benchwork edge to track
situation is going to be the determining factor as to whether anyone
will want to use these for operations, or just buy them for display
purposes in shows and contests. You have to be able to place the
magnetic wand over top of the coupler head to raise the steel ball out
of it's slot in the locking block in the coupler shank. This allows the
knuckle to open. When the knuckle closes, the steel ball drops back
into it's place and locks the knuckle closed. The prototype couplers
are designed the same way, except there is no steel ball to raise, just
the locking block which is actuated by the raising (or lowering,
depending on whether they are over or under-slung) of the cutting lever
on the car end. In an earlier discussion regarding the operation of
couplers, it was Larry Jackman who addressed the operation as to how
couplers lock and what has to occur to allow them to open. Many thanks
Larry, for making this clear to many who have not had the on the ground
experience in this area.

The ability to open them when they are mounted on passenger equipment
with diaphragms is a valid point. As Tim O'Connor mentioned, the
possible use of anisotropic magnets mounted on a wand designed for this
use and also mounted on an extended wand for distances would solve the
problems in both the passenger and freight situations. In regard to the
comment that the couplers have to be filed down to fit present draft
gear boxes: there was no mention of this in the paperwork that
accompanied the set that I received.

I'm sure that we all will be interested in what Jared Harper's results
as he begins to test these couplers in actual service. The big bugaboo
will be the ability to reach the cars and accurately get the wand into
position to uncouple the cars, or to be able to align couplers with the
cars buried in a yard more than two feet from the benchwork end. This
will really be a test of skill when humping cars, as you will only have
seconds to lift ball to uncouple the cars as they go over the hump or to
uncouple rear-end helpers on the fly. Most fellows that I know will not
use these couplers as they require the operator to get more involved in
the actual work of making and breaking up of trains and in switching
operations. The magnetic couplers in use today allow us to move along
quickly in an operating session, while use of the Sergent couplers will
bring us back to reality as nothing moves fast in actual railroad
switching and in train make-up and break-up operations. Just like the
Army - "Hurry Up and Wait!

But, for display and contest purposes, they cannot be beat! Hopefully,
Sergent will offer a scale draft gear box to make this superbly scaled
coupler. Do not get me wrong, the Quad 58/78 is a tremendous
improvement over the earlier #5 and I will use them until the Sargent is
proved to be good in operation and the problems are solved. Whether
they are depends on what others find when they use them. Jared, please
keep us up on what you find as it will be greatly appreciated!

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@u...


Re: Couplers, Coupler Pockets, and Trucks

Tim O'Connor
 

Pat, I was at Michael's (a craft store) the other day and noticed
they have a wide selection of small gage wire on spools that may
be perfect for making non-functional replacement springs. I got
some for making baled-wire loads for gondolas. They stock it in
the bead jewelry section.

I agree I hate the truck springs and think the Kadees roll badly,
but they're also great looking trucks! I toss the Kadee wheels
and replace with Reboxx, which improves them considerably in
both rolling quality and appearance. Step 2 will be to replace
the springs.

Tim O'Connor


Re: Couplers, Coupler Pockets, and Trucks

Patrick Wider <pwider@...>
 

That's fine - then just make them look like real springs! And thanks for the kind words!

Pat Wider

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "S. Busch" <SCSBusch@W...> wrote:

Pat Wider!

When I cut my teeth in model railroading, American Flyer had chrome plated
journal boxes on sheet steel sideframe trucks. The first time I ever saw
real looking truck they were HO sprung Varneys or Athearns or something.
Heck, even those ugly looking Silver Streak trucks looked good.

So, there you go. I have never quite recovered, and still prefer real
springs.

P.S. - love your research work and articles---

Steve Busch
Duncan, SC


----- Original Message -----
From: "Patrick Wider" <pwider@s...>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, October 07, 2005 12:17 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Couplers, Coupler Pockets, and Trucks


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "S. Busch" <SCSBusch@W...> wrote:

Please Mr. Sam At Kadee,

Yes, I vote for the 78s in bulk, too, as well as :

A USRA STYLE ANDREWS FREIGHT CAR TRUCK

- sprung, of course. Please, please, please ---
Why sprung? The toy cars aren't heavy enough to compress the springs
anyway and they
don't equalize so why bother? They also don't roll as well as they could.
I hate HO
"sprung" trucks. And while I'm at it Mr. Kadee, please replace those
spider-web springs
with something more substantial. I hate looking through the spring groups
and seeing the
daylight (layout lighting?) coming through. It's blinding. Jack Spencer
rolls his own springs
out of heavier wire and they look great! Other people use brass loco
driver springs. In
days of old when knights were bold and Central Valley made trucks with
concentric
wheels, their truck springs looked better as well. Phosphor bronze I
think. Why can't Kadee
make a similar improvement to the appearance of their trucks? Continuous
improvement -
that keeps companies in business.

Sorry but this a sore spot with me.

Pat Wider


Re: Couplers, Coupler Pockets, and Trucks

S. Busch <SCSBusch@...>
 

Pat Wider!

When I cut my teeth in model railroading, American Flyer had chrome plated journal boxes on sheet steel sideframe trucks. The first time I ever saw real looking truck they were HO sprung Varneys or Athearns or something. Heck, even those ugly looking Silver Streak trucks looked good.

So, there you go. I have never quite recovered, and still prefer real springs.

P.S. - love your research work and articles---

Steve Busch
Duncan, SC

----- Original Message -----
From: "Patrick Wider" <pwider@sbcglobal.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, October 07, 2005 12:17 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Couplers, Coupler Pockets, and Trucks


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "S. Busch" <SCSBusch@W...> wrote:

Please Mr. Sam At Kadee,

Yes, I vote for the 78s in bulk, too, as well as :

A USRA STYLE ANDREWS FREIGHT CAR TRUCK

- sprung, of course. Please, please, please ---
Why sprung? The toy cars aren't heavy enough to compress the springs anyway and they
don't equalize so why bother? They also don't roll as well as they could. I hate HO
"sprung" trucks. And while I'm at it Mr. Kadee, please replace those spider-web springs
with something more substantial. I hate looking through the spring groups and seeing the
daylight (layout lighting?) coming through. It's blinding. Jack Spencer rolls his own springs
out of heavier wire and they look great! Other people use brass loco driver springs. In
days of old when knights were bold and Central Valley made trucks with concentric
wheels, their truck springs looked better as well. Phosphor bronze I think. Why can't Kadee
make a similar improvement to the appearance of their trucks? Continuous improvement -
that keeps companies in business.

Sorry but this a sore spot with me.

Pat Wider


Re: Were there 10' IH 50' 1937 AAR DD boxcars?

Patrick Wider <pwider@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@c...> wrote:


22200-22449 were AF-3's. 9100-9149 were A-2's. 10000-10199 were AF's.
Pat Wider

I show 10000-10999 being AF-2's. So you're saying 10000-10199 were not
the same as 10200-10999? I know the latter are AF-2's from photos.

Did you mean to write A-2 (instead of AF-2)? Was there an A-1 class ?

Are you saying chronological order is AF AF-1 AF-2 AF-3 A-2 AF-4 AF-5 ?
There are no typos in my message.

AF-2's were numbered 11700-11999 and 22000-22199.

A-1's were numbered 9011-9060.

Pat Wider


Re: Couplers, Coupler Pockets, and Trucks

Patrick Wider <pwider@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "S. Busch" <SCSBusch@W...> wrote:

Please Mr. Sam At Kadee,

Yes, I vote for the 78s in bulk, too, as well as :

A USRA STYLE ANDREWS FREIGHT CAR TRUCK

- sprung, of course. Please, please, please ---
Why sprung? The toy cars aren't heavy enough to compress the springs anyway and they
don't equalize so why bother? They also don't roll as well as they could. I hate HO
"sprung" trucks. And while I'm at it Mr. Kadee, please replace those spider-web springs
with something more substantial. I hate looking through the spring groups and seeing the
daylight (layout lighting?) coming through. It's blinding. Jack Spencer rolls his own springs
out of heavier wire and they look great! Other people use brass loco driver springs. In
days of old when knights were bold and Central Valley made trucks with concentric
wheels, their truck springs looked better as well. Phosphor bronze I think. Why can't Kadee
make a similar improvement to the appearance of their trucks? Continuous improvement -
that keeps companies in business.

Sorry but this a sore spot with me.

Pat Wider


Re: Couplers, Coupler Pockets, The NMRA, and Scale Size

SamClarke
 

Hello again everyone,

We appreciate your requests for bulk packages of #78 couplers and we'll seriously consider it.

Thanks to those who commented about our #205 coupler height gauge. It does in fact come with both the #5 and #58 couplers, however, since proper coupler height is measured to the center of the coupler you can use either size of coupler to check the other (thank you Andy). It is easier, though, to use the same size of head rather trying to line up the centerline of the couplers. The packaging color is the same as the older ones except it has a black bar code.

We have tested the Sergent couplers quite extensively and to keep this on a professional basis I will not comment on our findings. However, these are very nice couplers and do have their own place in the market. They will work (run) with Kadee couplers but you have to "hand fit them together" but for coupling and uncoupling you'll have to do some trimming and custom work on them.

Sam Clarke
Kadee Quality Products


Re: Couplers, Coupler Pockets, The NMRA, and Scale Size

Andy Sperandeo <asperandeo@...>
 

Rob Manley asked:"As for my request, how about a scale coupler height gauge?"And Ben Hom answered:
"Just take one of the current production Kadee coupler height gauges and replace the #5 with a #58, which drops right in."

In fact, the recent production (at least since earlier this year) of Kadee no. 205 coupler height gauges includes both a no. 5 and a no. 58 coupler in the package. You can take your choice. Since the shanks of these couplers are the same and both have heads centered vertically on the shank, the same gauge works for both couplers.

Alas, I don't remember the package color of the last no. 205 I bought.

So long,

AndyAndy Sperandeo
Executive Editor
Model Railroader magazine
asperandeo@mrmag.com
Phone: 262-796-8776, ex. 461
Fax: 262-796-1142
www.modelrailroader.com


Couplers, Coupler Pockets, and Trucks

S. Busch <SCSBusch@...>
 

Please Mr. Sam At Kadee,

Yes, I vote for the 78s in bulk, too, as well as :

A USRA STYLE ANDREWS FREIGHT CAR TRUCK

- sprung, of course. Please, please, please ---

Thanks!

Steve Busch
Duncan, SC


Re: Couplers, Coupler Pockets, The NMRA, and Scale Size

bierglaeser <bierglaeser@...>
 

Sam at Kadee,
Yes, please. Let's have bulk packs of #78s.
Gene Green


Re: Were there 10' IH 50' 1937 AAR DD boxcars?

Tim O'Connor
 

22200-22449 were AF-3's. 9100-9149 were A-2's. 10000-10199 were AF's.
Pat Wider

I show 10000-10999 being AF-2's. So you're saying 10000-10199 were not
the same as 10200-10999? I know the latter are AF-2's from photos.

Did you mean to write A-2 (instead of AF-2)? Was there an A-1 class ?

Are you saying chronological order is AF AF-1 AF-2 AF-3 A-2 AF-4 AF-5 ?


Re: Were there 10' IH 50' 1937 AAR DD boxcars?

James D Thompson <jaydeet@...>
 

PM series 71000-71249 blt ? ?
PSC 10-30, Climax roof

PM series 71250-71349 blt 1936 S-corner
Ralston, inverse 4-3 Dreadnaught ends, Viking roof

PM series 72000-72099 blt 1940 W-corner Duryea 4/5 ends
Greenville, 5-4 Dreadnaught ends, Viking roof

PM series 72100-72199 blt 1941-1942 W-corner Duryea 5/5 ends
Greenville, 5-4 Dreadnaught ends, Viking roof. 72100-72124 didn't have end doors.

David Thompson, this is all in the PM freight car book...


Re: Sergent/Kadee couplers

Thomas M. Olsen <tmolsen@...>
 

List,
Pardon me in regard to wasting bandwith to correct the last paragraph in my post regarding these couplers. It should have read "Kadee" 58/78---
not Quad. The finger on the button in spell-check is absolutely quicker than the eye!

Tom Olsen
Newark, De. 19711-7479


Sergent Couplers

Thomas M. Olsen <tmolsen@...>
 

List,

In mid-June, I purchased a set of assembled Sargent Couplers (#EC87A-125) along with the Magnetic Uncoupling Wand. The price for the two items with shipping was $18.00. You get five assembled Type "E" couplers. They work very well and are smaller in size than the Kadee #58s. Even though I have not had the opportunity to mount them in a piece of rolling stock, I was able to test how they work. These couplers are all-metal and are a dark reddish-brown in color which at a distance make the coupler look as if it were covered with rust.

In reality, they operate just like the prototype. They have a spring located in the shank ahead of the mounting hole like the MKD-4 Kadee to absorb the shock when the coupling is made. After uncoupling, they, like the prototype do not return to center as the Kadee and other HO couplers available do. They do not mate with other knuckle couplers due to the size difference between a proto-87 coupler and the present couplers available with the exception of the cast dummy couplers. The manufacturer advises that with a little filling on the dummy coupler knuckle, they will couple. To couple, they, like their prototype cousins require the services of a brakeman to align the coupler and if necessary to open one of the knuckles if both are closed. They will couple if only one is open and both are properly aligned. The present information sheet from Sergent advises that the current offerings are to retrofit existing equipment. It is possible that they may offer draft gear boxes in the future as they said "Stay Tuned!'

This coupler position and open/closed knuckle situation could be a problem for anyone who has a fairly large hump, staging or flat switched yard or any other location where the benchwork edge is more than an arms length or the track centers are close at a distance with rolling stock close on adjacent tracks. The distance benchwork edge to track situation is going to be the determining factor as to whether anyone will want to use these for operations, or just buy them for display purposes in shows and contests. You have to be able to place the magnetic wand over top of the coupler head to raise the steel ball out of it's slot in the locking block in the coupler shank. This allows the knuckle to open. When the knuckle closes, the steel ball drops back into it's place and locks the knuckle closed. The prototype couplers are designed the same way, except there is no steel ball to raise, just the locking block which is actuated by the raising (or lowering, depending on whether they are over or under-slung) of the cutting lever on the car end. In an earlier discussion regarding the operation of couplers, it was Larry Jackman who addressed the operation as to how couplers lock and what has to occur to allow them to open. Many thanks Larry, for making this clear to many who have not had the on the ground experience in this area.

The ability to open them when they are mounted on passenger equipment with diaphragms is a valid point. As Tim O'Connor mentioned, the possible use of anisotropic magnets mounted on a wand designed for this use and also mounted on an extended wand for distances would solve the problems in both the passenger and freight situations. In regard to the comment that the couplers have to be filed down to fit present draft gear boxes: there was no mention of this in the paperwork that accompanied the set that I received.

I'm sure that we all will be interested in what Jared Harper's results as he begins to test these couplers in actual service. The big bugaboo will be the ability to reach the cars and accurately get the wand into position to uncouple the cars, or to be able to align couplers with the cars buried in a yard more than two feet from the benchwork end. This will really be a test of skill when humping cars, as you will only have seconds to lift ball to uncouple the cars as they go over the hump or to uncouple rear-end helpers on the fly. Most fellows that I know will not use these couplers as they require the operator to get more involved in the actual work of making and breaking up of trains and in switching operations. The magnetic couplers in use today allow us to move along quickly in an operating session, while use of the Sergent couplers will bring us back to reality as nothing moves fast in actual railroad switching and in train make-up and break-up operations. Just like the Army - "Hurry Up and Wait!

But, for display and contest purposes, they cannot be beat! Hopefully, Sergent will offer a scale draft gear box to make this superbly scaled coupler. Do not get me wrong, the Quad 58/78 is a tremendous improvement over the earlier #5 and I will use them until the Sargent is proved to be good in operation and the problems are solved. Whether they are depends on what others find when they use them. Jared, please keep us up on what you find as it will be greatly appreciated!

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@udel.edu

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